How to contact us
EPRG
 c/o Simon Hix
 Department of Government
 London School of Economics 
 and Political Science
 Houghton Street
 London WC2A 2AE
 United Kingdom
 (e-mail: s.hix@lse.ac.uk|)

EPRG research projects


How MEP's vote

Simon Hix, Abdul Noury and Gérard Roland

The project analyses the voting behaviour of MEPs between 1979 and 2004. At a theoretical level, the research will develop a model of MEP behaviour that will try to predict the way individual MEPs, national party delegations and EP party groups vote in the day-to-day working of the EP.

The model will seek to answer such questions as: when do MEPs vote with the EP party groups?; when do they vote with their national parties?; and do they respond to local demands or European-wide public opinion?. 

 The project is co-funded by the Economic and Social Research Council of the UK, the Universite Libre de Bruxelles, The Nuffield Foundation, and The Leverhulme Trust.

Outputs from the project:


Electoral reform, parliamentary representation and the British MEP 

David Farrell and Roger Scully

This study comprises an analysis of the constituency service activities of British MEPs, and the impact upon them of the move to a closed-list PR electoral system. The project assesses the relative importance of strategic incentives (generated by the electoral system) and cultural factors (linked to conceptions of representation) in shaping parliamentarians attitudes and behaviour. This study is also linked to a wider, cross-national analysis of constituency representation in the EP that draws on data from the MEP2000 survey.  The project is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council of the UK, Grant: R000239231. 


Are roll-call votes biased?

Clifford Carrubba and Matthew Gabel

[Details to follow shortly] 


Multilingualism at the European Parliament

Virginie Mamadouh

The project analyses multilingualism at the European Parliament. The European Union has presently 11 official and working languages and institutional multilingualism is largely implemented at the European Parliament where documents are translated in all working languages and simultaneous interpretation is available from and into all official languages during formal meetings (plenaries and committee meetings).

The project examines the challenge of multilingualism for a representative institution as the European Parliament. It focuses on individual MEPs and scrutinizes their language skills and their communication potential.

A longitudinal study over the last decade investigates multilingualism in a period of rapid changes due to the growing powers for the EP (and the resulting workload) and successive enlargements, assessing the relative strength of the official languages and more specifically the position of French and English as the linguae francae of the EU institutions.




Outputs from the project

  • Mamadouh, V., 1995: De talen in het Europees Parlement [Languages in the European Parliament], Vol. ASGS 52, Amsterdam: ISG, Universiteit van Amsterdam. 154 pp. 
  • Mamadouh, V., 1999: Le parlement européen comme espace plurilingue, Géographie et Cultures (30): 109-124. 
  • Mamadouh, V., 1999, Institutional Multilingualism in the European institutions, in: European Cultural Foundation, Which languages for Europe? Report of he Conference held in Oegstgeest, The Netherlands, 9-11 October 1998, 119-125. 
  • Mamadouh, V., 1999, Concluding Remarks, in: European Cultural Foundation, Which languages for Europe? Report of he Conference held in Oegstgeest, The Netherlands, 9-11 October 1998, 155-171.
  • Mamadouh, V., 1999:Dealing with multilingualism in the European Union: rationalities and language policies. Paper presented at ECPR 1999 Mannheim. 
  • Mamadouh, V. and Hofman, K., 2001:The language constellation at the European Parliament, Amsterdam: AME / European Cultural Foundation. 80 pp.
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