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Kathryn Gjorgjiev

Graduate Intern (Projects, Communications and Events)

k.g.gjorgjiev@lse.ac.uk|

Seeming and Being in Mobile Modernity: Veils in US Vogue, 1915-25

The Gender Institute will host a research seminar led by Dr Ilya Parkins

  • Tuesday 29 April 2014 (Originally posted as Tuesday 18 March 2014)
  • 12.30 - 2pm
  • STC.S221, St Clement's, Clare Market, LSE 
  • Chaired by Dr Sadie Wearing

In the years of the veil’s declining popularity as a fashion accessory, the US edition of Vogue devoted sustained attention to this garment. A series of textual meditations on its significance amounted to a minor philosophical discourse on concealment, revelation and femininity itself. This preliminary investigation of these treatments of veiling considers its positioning vis-à-vis both the white women who were the normative subjects and imagined readers of the magazine, and orientalised women who were only spectrally present in the pages of Vogue. Ilya suggests that veiling presents a significant instance of power-saturated relational encounter, highlighting asymmetrical points of contact between two feminine imaginaries, which hinged on questions of ontology, epistemology, and mobility. 

Dr. Ilya Parkins is a Visiting Fellow in the Gender Institute for Michaelmas, Lent, and Summer Terms, 2013-14. She is an Assistant Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan Campus. Ilya is a specialist in contemporary feminist cultural theories, early twentieth-century Western cultural formations, and fashion studies. She is the author of Poiret, Dior and Schiaparelli: Fashion, Femininity and Modernity, and co-editor, with Lily Sheehan, of Cultures of Femininity in Modern Fashion. Ilya’s research has appeared in such periodicals asAustralian Feminist StudiesTime and SocietyTopiaWomen’s Studies, and Biography

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