OfficesAlumniProfiles

Alumni profiles

We really value and want to keep in touch with LSE Gender Alumni to help build a stronger community. Current students often ask about what Alumni are doing now. With our new Alumni Profiles Project, we have created a space for you to let us know what you’re up to and the chance to share your story with past, present and prospective LSE students.


I now want to make a difference for people, not just myself.

However, my drive to accomplish projects and goals hasn't changed the slightest - only the types of goals I set.

  

It is a life changing course...

  

The study of gender is part of a wider story about social exclusion, social (in)justice and fundamental questions about living.

  

I have built a sound knowledge base for the career path that I want to set out on. I have also built a strong network of people that I know I can go back to for ideation and assistance.

 

MSc Gender

Alexandra Fanghanel, Class of 2006

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What year did you graduate?
2006

What are you doing now?
Senior Lecturer, Criminology, University of Greenwich

Why do you think it is important to study gender?
The study of gender is part of wider story about social exclusion, social (in)justice and fundamental questions about living. Studying for my masters opened my eyes to new ways of thinking about problems and laid the groundwork for what I would go on to do.

In what ways do you think you benefitted from doing your Masters?
It taught be to be critical, to be thoughtful, to be open minded. It taught me to think about things that had never occurred to me before as gender-related problems and it provided me with the tools to go on doing this rigorously.

What advice would you have for people during their studies?
A great teacher of mine at the GI challenged us to be promiscuous with our reading. It is great advice that has enabled me to make discoveries in disciplines as varied as art history, classics, philosophy and literature for my current criminological work.

How has completing your masters affected your employment aspirations and career trajectory?
It was at the GI that I decided I wanted to be a university lecturer. And now I am one.

To what extent have you used what you learnt at the GI and LSE in your current role?
I often use it; I still even have some reading lists which I refer to for my own writing and teaching. The techniques of teaching influence my practice now and the ideas are absolutely current to me now.

Dr Shalini Grover, Class of 1997

What year did you graduate?
1997 (My course was between 1996-7)

What are you doing now?
I am an Associate Professor in Social Anthropology (Institute of Economic Growth, University of Delhi). I am also an Honorary Fellow with the University of Edinburgh. My PhD is from the Department of Anthropology, University of Sussex (2000-5). My BA is from the University of Cambridge and University of Delhi.

Why did you want to study here at the Gender Institute (GI) at LSE?
The Gender Institute attracted me for multiple reasons. Henrietta Moore had designed the main GI course and her work, as well as vision, was important for me. Then there was the wider ambience of the LSE and its impressive research environ. This meant fantastic access to London. More, importantly, I knew I would be with a cohort of international students who would throw in an all-together different and nuanced light on gender relations. Indeed, many of my peers had extensive work experience in gender through praxis.

Why do you think it is important to study gender?
I was only 26, but had come to realize that it was an unequal world. This was not just prompted by me being an ‘Indian woman’ per say, as I have previously lived in Kenya, Norway, and the United Kingdom. I had a feminist consciousness, but it was clearly underdeveloped. I was also influenced by the United Nations Conference for Women in Beijing (1995) for which I had done background work when I was working for UNIFEM, New Delhi.

What did you enjoy the most about studying this subject area?
Gender remains pivotal to my current research in social anthropology; they are intertwined. By studying gender (and choosing the LSE) I learnt the importance of engaging with theory and questioning so many assumptions and stereotypes that pervade our everyday life! I learnt to reflect critically, and I thank the GI for paying immense attention to our writing skills. These are precious skills I took away with me. All I can say is that the conversations at the GI were great and unforgettable!

In what ways do you think you benefitted from doing your Masters?
After my Masters, I did a PhD in Social Anthropology. The Gender Course left a concrete impression and to reiterate (as above) a great set of skills. Once again, I stress the merit given to writing skills and presenting a coherent structure. These are germane to the Doctoral Process.

What advice would you have for people interested in applying?
I think the unique strength of the GI and therefore a reason to apply for this course, is it interdisciplinary character. Through Gender Studies we get to learn anthropology, post-colonial studies, development, sociology etc. All this means that we comprehend gender theory and practice from very different and useful angles. I distinctly remember seminars on ‘that awkward relationship between feminism and anthropology’, and how fascinating all this was! How we went back and forth between these two disciplines! Overall, the courses are flexible and the tutors are always open to different ideas. These are great strengths and make for a strong grounding in scholarship.

What advice would you have for people during their studies?
Oh I don’t know where to begin! It was transformatory for me. I think students will enjoy the passionate debates and discussions!

How has completing your masters affected your employment aspirations and career trajectory?

Well clearly in a very positive light! While my PhD is my main degree qualification as an academic, my Masters from the LSE facilitated my academic trajectory in a major way.

To what extent have you used what you learnt at the GI and LSE in your current role?

I have benefitted from the rich course outlines which have inspired my own teaching and research.

Ella Jay Taylor, Class of 2016

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What programme did you do? 
MSc Gender Studies MSc

What year did you graduate? 
2016

What are you doing now? 
PR & Policy Officer at an accessible housing association, and Co-Editor of an independent multimedia platform.

Why did you want to study here at the Gender Institute (GI) at LSE? 
I took a ‘Gender and Development’ module during undergrad, and ended up integrating gender analysis into every assignment I completed afterwards. I knew from that moment that I wanted to do a Masters in gender studies, but had no idea where to study. In the end, I chose LSE because of the global recognition of their reputation, but also because I had heard such positive things about the GI from former students.

Why do you think it is important to study gender? 
I feel that, as part of a broader intersectional analysis, gender is a key component of comprehension for everyday life, social interactions, oppression and inclusion. People often ask me what it ‘means’ to study gender or comment on how ‘niche’ it is, but I genuinely think it was one of the most useful things to study at Masters level because of the broad range of understandings you develop.

What did you enjoy the most about studying this subject area? 
My colleagues and the faculty were from a range of academic/professional backgrounds and geographical locations, and all had different specialisms and modes of analysis to bring to the table. This complemented the variety of topics we covered every week, and I felt really supported and inspired by this environment.

In what ways do you think you benefitted from doing your Masters? 
Completing a Masters in Gender Studies has positively impacted so many areas of my life, both personally and professionally. I have a lot more confidence in my academic ability than I did previously, and my ability to write or debate persuasively and passionately has greatly improved. I am also really grateful for the connections and friendships I made with my cohort and during my time at the GI.

What advice would you have for people interested in applying? 
Do it! But if you’re not sure it’s for you, attend some of the free events at LSE featuring GI faculty members, and speak to others who have previously studied at the GI.

What advice would you have for people during their studies? 
Make the most of it – engage with every part of the student experience, attend extracurricular lectures, go to as many events as possible and meet people. ‘Networking’ is such a corporate word but it can genuinely have a huge impact on the opportunities you have when you graduate. I wish that I had made more time for volunteering during my studies, as this can be a great way to secure employment for when you finish studying.

How has completing your masters affected your employment aspirations and career trajectory? 
I would not have got my current role in PR and Policy without a Masters degree, and my employer really liked my writing style – which I feel has vastly improved since studying at the GI. Similarly with working as a Co-Editor, I feel that I am qualified for both of these roles thanks to postgraduate study and the steep learning curve involved. I doubt I would be where I am today without this experience.

To what extent have you used what you learnt at the GI and LSE in your current role? 
I use the things I learnt at the GI every day. Working for an accessible housing association means that my awareness of intersectional oppression is highly valuable, and postgraduate study has greatly improved my understanding of inclusion. This helps me write policy which is sensitive to multiple factors, and the skills I developed at the GI have equipped me with the ability to persuade policy makers regarding the value of access and inclusion.

MSc Gender (Research)

Luca Dellepiane, Class of 2014

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What year did you graduate? 
2014

What are you doing now? 
Research and Policy Adviser - Notting Hill Housing Association

Why did you want to study here at the Gender Institute (GI) at LSE?
I did a master in Human Rights in Italy and my dissertation was on the subject of women’s rights and cultural rights. However, in writing the dissertation, I realised that my academic education was missing a feminist perspective. As a white, heterosexual, middle class man that grew up in a heteronormative environment I needed to be challenged. At the same time I wanted to be exposed to a rigorous academic environment. The GI met both my requirements: rigorous focus on research and a challenging gender studies course.

Why do you think it is important to study gender?
I think it is important because we still live in a highly discriminatory and unequal society. Studying gender doesn’t exclusively focus on gender inequalities and allows the student to look at intersections of inequalities. Secondly, it is important because it challenges the status quo. Finally, especially for a person with my characteristics, studying gender opens the mind to a reality that is rarely questioned.

What did you enjoy the most about studying this subject area?
I will be repetitive but studying this subject area allowed me to interpret the world with a different set of tools and question discriminations that I would not have questioned before.

In what ways do you think you benefitted from doing your Masters?
It has been certainly beneficial because it changed the way I behave, the way I speak and how I interpret the society. Secondly, the academic rigor of the LSE enabled me to have a strong research background, which I did not have before.

What advice would you have for people interested in applying?
Apply because it is a life changing course, but do some preliminary readings if you haven’t studied gender theories before! For as much as I loved Spivak and Butler (and I really did) being at least partly prepared gives you an advantage. Secondly, if you are not a native English speaker, some preliminary reading will help you familiarize with what at times can be a challenging vocabulary.

What advice would you have for people during their studies?
Ask questions, do your readings for class/seminars, make sure that you organize your time well and relax when you are not close to deadlines.

How has completing your masters affected your employment aspirations and career trajectory?
When I started the master my career objective  was either to work in social research or to do a PhD. Completing the master allowed me to better understand what I wanted to do and, even though I work in a field that doesn’t appear to be ‘strictly related’ to gender studies, the master has been crucial for my career. Straight after the Master I had the opportunity to further develop my research skills working on a project focused on tackling gender inequalities for a big international organisation.

I then moved on to a different field (housing) and maintained a role in social research. I am now involved on different research projects within my organization and I work closely with the Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Group of my organization.

To what extent have you used what you learnt at the GI and LSE in your current role?
I use what I learnt at the GI and LSE regularly. Doing social research I use research skills learnt at the LSE/GI often. The same can be said in terms of building convincing arguments and using evidence to influence decisions.

Having studied gender studies allows me to challenge decisions that do not take into consideration sex, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual, orientation and age and I help carrying out equality impact assessment analysis for the organisation.  

Finally, studying at the LSE/GI allowed me to understand the importance of keep challenging what is presented to me, something that I regularly do in my current role.

MSc Gender, Media and Culture

Adam Dall, Class of 2015

What year did you graduate? 
2015

What are you doing now? 
Business Development Officer 

Why did you want to study here at the Gender Institute (GI) at LSE? 
I wanted to explore gender as a social construct to understand how it's controlling society at large, and at micro level as well. 

Why do you think it is important to study gender?
Because it is an incredibly strong social institution that comes with unlimited amounts of boundaries and very few freedoms for the individual. Understanding these enables me to better navigate social dynamics as a member of society, friend, partner, employee, manager and worker.

What did you enjoy the most about studying this subject area?
How it contributed to my self-understanding and personal development. All aspect of my studies at LSE was challenging and rewarding. My time studying sexuality was ground-breaking for me as I had never imagined how much heterosexual norms control how society functions. 

In what ways do you think you benefitted from doing your Masters?
On a very personal level I became a better and more whole version of myself.

What advice would you have for people interested in applying?
If you want to understand and challenge social norms, take a look at gender and you will realize this is intertwined with every single aspect of our lives. You don't have to be a gender fanatic to appreciate gender roles, all you have to care about it how society functions. 

What advice would you have for people during their studies?
Take a breath, take a break, adjust your expectations, and enjoy the ride. Use the free therapy sessions and talk to you mentors about your stress.

How has completing your masters affected your employment aspirations and career trajectory?
It changed them completely from being money focused to humanity focus. I have truly realized there is more to life than bonuses and promotions. I now want to make a difference for people, not just myself. However, my drive to accomplish projects and goals hasn't changed the slightest - only the types of goals I set.

To what extent have you used what you learnt at the GI and LSE in your current role?
As I work in Business Development I strategize how to gain more business and retain current ones (charity). Therefore, it is limited how it's directly applied. However, the MSc made me who I am, and I wouldn't have ever gone for a charity job prior to my studies. In that sense, being who I am now means applying what I have learned into my every day at work. I work my dream job; applying my business skills where my heart lies.

Suzannah Rogan, Class of 2016

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What year did you graduate? 
2016

What are you doing now? 
Project Coordinator, Sexual Assault Prevention and Education, Doane University

Why did you want to study here at the Gender Institute (GI) at LSE? 
I worked with middle school and high school students for years in violence prevention before applying. I realized during that time that students were consuming media that shaped their perceptions of relationships, race, sexuality, and gender. I wanted a program that would provide a foundational knowledge to help me work with students to deconstruct the media representations perpetuating negative stereotypes. I felt like I was constantly battling these stereotypes when I teaching students. The Gender, Media and Culture degree was the best choice and seemed tailor-made for what I wanted to do. It also helps that the program was in London so I was able to see as much theatre as possible.

Why do you think it is important to study gender? 
I work in the gender-based violence field. It is important to have a working theoretical knowledge so I can bring as many groups to the table toward ending GBV. I specifically focused on masculinity studies as a way of ensuring I had the ability to engage men in my work. I believe that studying gender also gives tools to approach everyday life. Since obtaining my MSc, I find that I am much more vocal about everyday microaggressions, gaslighting, and inequalities. 

What did you enjoy the most about studying this subject area? 
I feel I gained a broad knowledge of all things gender, whether I really wanted to read it or not (I’m looking at you Freud). Yet at the same time, I was able to focus my work when needed and dive into the concepts and theories that really interested me. The seminars allowed for rich debate and a time to work through ideas in a way that challenged me intellectually.

In what ways do you think you benefitted from doing your Masters? 
I used my masters as a catalyst in a career switch. Prior to my masters, I was mainly in violence prevention as a volunteer. Studying gender allowed me to focus on finding a position that employed gender theory and violence prevention. 

What advice would you have for people interested in applying? 
The Gender Institute is one of the most challenging and rewarding programs. Just make sure you have your study habits in order before you start. You will need them. 

What advice would you have for people during their studies? 
Find a group of folks who are willing to work with you and challenge you (and hopefully have fun with you as well). Work together so you can enhance each other’s knowledge. And find someone who can edit your work. No matter how good a writer, you always need a second set of eyes. Finally, you get out of the program what you put into it. Do the work. 

How has completing your masters affected your employment aspirations and career trajectory? 
I was able to make a career switch and now work full time in the violence prevention field coordinating for a Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women Grant at a university.

To what extent have you used what you learnt at the GI and LSE in your current role? 
I use what I learned a great deal. As I approach programming for the next few years, I am working with students, staff, and faculty to shape media literacy programs, masculinities programs, and primary prevention programs that examine the structures that support rape culture on college campuses in the US. Additionally, our grant requires that programming be research based/evidence informed. The research skills that I gained have helped me as I approach program development. I am working in a conservative state in the US which brings a unique set of challenges when discussing sexuality, gender, and race with students; though these are necessary conversations for my work. Having a masters from the GI has proved incredibly useful when these discussions take place. At times students have no idea why they think the way they do (generally just using the ideas their parents gifted them) and being able to provide reading for them helps shape their intellectual journey and, hopefully, make them someone who will contribute positively to society.

MSc Gender, Development and Globalisation

Georgia Skupinski, Class of 2016

What year did you graduate? 
2016

What are you doing now? 
I am working as a Diversity and Inclusion Administrator at King’s College London

Why did you want to study here at the Gender Institute (GI) at LSE? 
It had always been one of my goals to study at the LSE and following my interest in the study of Gender since my A Levels, it made sense to apply for my Masters at the GI.  It was incredible to be taught by lecturers whose books I had been reading for the past 5 years.  I didn’t know this before I studied there, but it really is the most supportive environment I have ever come across – it was like a family. 

Why do you think it is important to study gender? 
Where do you even start with this question? I think on the surface gender is just whether you are a boy or a girl or possibly your sexuality – or whether you are a feminist or not. I think that is probably what a lot of people think I studied. But gender is central to everything; the words we use, the way society is shaped, the way opportunities are afforded and the way our lives pan out and so much more. 

In what ways do you think you benefitted from doing your Masters? 
Aside from the knowledge and perspectives I gained, I met a lot of amazing people and made some lifelong friends. I developed a lot of resilience over the course of the year and getting a Merit for this course is probably one of my biggest achievements. 

What advice would you have for people during their studies?
Join a gym or make sure that you get regular exercise.  It was the best piece of advice I was given during my Masters and it really helped me in terms of having a break from reading and writing.  It is so easy to say in hindsight, but try and see past your stress and enjoy your experience, because studying at the GI is a once in a life time opportunity and you are surrounded by so many amazing people.

How has completing your masters affected your employment aspirations and career trajectory? 
When I finished my Masters I still didn’t really know what I wanted to do so I went to work for a recruitment company.  However it became apparent very quickly that I couldn’t work for an organisation that did not share my values that had been upheld at the GI, and I found the world of Diversity and Inclusion. I think I cared more about financial gains before, now I just want to make a difference, even if it is small.

To what extent have you used what you learnt at the GI and LSE in your current role? 
I don’t use too much of what I learned about development and globalisation in my job, I keep them as my interests, but everything else that I learned is extremely applicable to Diversity and Inclusion. Thanks to the Equality Act, Diversity and Inclusion is expanding in most industries now and is a great way for organisations to ensure that they provide an inclusive environment and are diverse in their practice.  It’s a really great area to work in.

Rachele Megna, Class of 2015

What year did you graduate? 
2015

What are you doing now?
Researcher and coordinator of UN Women’s Executive Office

Why did you want to study here at the Gender Institute (GI) at LSE? 
What I expected from the course was to gain a lens through which to “see and understand” the world and our experiences in it. I wanted to challenge myself and explore in some depth what it means to live, think and perform gender. I had followed some courses in my undergraduate degree on gender and sexuality and I always found them to be the most fun, challenging and exciting topics, and I decided to pursue that interest further.

Why do you think it is important to study gender? 
To me, studying gender was and is a necessity to live myself and the world in a better and clearer way. Thinking through gender clears my mind and allows me to see things and analyze dynamics (micro as well as structural dynamics) more clearly. It is a tool that enables change at the personal and social level.

What did you enjoy the most about studying this subject area? 
My Master degree was a journey like no other- intellectually as well as personally. The incredible community at the GI was surely the highlight of my time at LSE, and the powerful political commitment of the gender institute as a whole is an inspiration of how a certain type of education can change minds and the world. By education I mean the process of giving and acquiring courage to think, read and love differently- that was the highlight and the most powerful skill I acquired during my time at the GI.

In what ways do you think you benefitted from doing your Masters? 
The benefits went well beyond the title and, as mentioned, included the development of a strong personal, intellectual and professional trajectory into critical theory and gender and development studies. Now working in a UN institution, I use those lens gained at the GI to analyse, navigate and perhaps change this world.

What advice would you have for people interested in applying? 
To do it, and to have the courage to surrender to complexity and difficult thinking.

What advice would you have for people during their studies? 
Again, to have the courage to surrender to the complexity and the depth of gender(ed) relations.

How has completing your masters affected your employment aspirations and career trajectory? 
I would have never thought to work for the UN, and probably I would have never had this opportunity without the title that the master offered, and I would not enjoy my work as much as I do without what the master gave me.

To what extent have you used what you learnt at the GI and LSE in your current role? 
I use what I learned everyday, every minute and every second of my job. I find that gender theory has the power to attach to you- I will not let any person/space make me forget the power of what I learnt.

Salonie Hiriyur, Class of 2016

What year did you graduate? 
2016

What are you doing now? 
Junior Research Officer at the ILO, Geneva
 
Why did you want to study here at the Gender Institute (GI) at LSE?
Having had (some) field experience, I wanted to back it up with a sound theoretical base in gender, feminist theory and development issues.  

Why do you think it is important to study gender?
The world, as I see it, was constructed mainly by men and for men. To achieve any substantial and sustainable progress in any field (labour market, health, environment etc.), it is imperative to bring a gender lens to the field of study.

What did you enjoy the most about studying this subject area?
Apart from the wonderful professors, the brilliant cohort and just being in London, I loved the constant stimulation and the process of making my mind work in a way it hadn’t before.

In what ways do you think you benefitted from doing your Masters?
I have built a sound knowledge base for the career path that I want to set out on. I have also built a strong network of people that I know I can go back to for ideation and assistance

What advice would you have for people interested in applying?
If you want to be at the LSE, it probably doesn’t get better than the Gender Institute.

What advice would you have for people during their studies?
Put in the work - it may seem like a lot of reading and writing and thinking but it’s all just so worth it. Tap into your professors brain, you probably won’t have access to these people in the same way again. Invest in the relationships that come out of this one year.

To what extent have you used what you learnt at the GI and LSE in your current role?
I have been applying what I have learnt into my work very directly since I work with the gendered dimensions of some of the research that comes out of the ILO. Particularly, this has been in terms of women and the world of work - female labour force participation, critiquing literature for its gender dimensions, female entrepreneurship, unpaid work and ramifications of its exclusion from mainstream economic frameworks, socio-cultural dimensions vis-a-vis women and work

Updates from our alumni

MSc Gender

Jac sm Kee (MSc Gender, 2003-2004)

Jac sm Kee is currently managing the Women's Rights Programme of the Association for Progressive Communications. The Programme looks at internet rights and policy in relation to women's human rights, and aims to strengthen the analysis and activism around how the internet is shaped and imagined through feminist perspectives. Part of the work includes a global campaign called ‘Take Back the Tech!’ that calls for women and girls to take control of the internet to transform power relations and end violence against women, both online and offline. The Programme also publishes an online gender and internet policy resource journal that interrogates emerging issues like access, privacy and surveillance, freedom of expression, transparency in governance and the economy from a gendered lens.

We welcome contributions and participation in both of these key initiatives. For more information: www.takebackthetech.netwww.genderit.org and www.apc.org.

We are quite flexible on the issues so far it is related to gender and internet policy and culture. But if this is too broad as you advice, we also produce thematic/focus editions, every 2nd-3rd months, so the students can either contribute to these or we can think together of particular topics which would resonate with them, for example some hot issues on our radars are currently: mapping of feminist tech efforts, new sustainable development goals, economy and tech (both its neoliberal model as well as emerging alternative economy models) or persisting gender gap in access to the internet.

Caroline Paranandi (MSc Gender, 2011-12)

After almost a decade working as a journalist in London I took a year out to scratch an academic itch at the LSE Gender Institute. Gender was everywhere in the world, and I was curious to understand more about what it is and how it works. The subject was quite different from my undergrad degree in history and international relations from the University of St Andrews and I was constantly challenged by new ideas, concepts and ways of thinking. Since returning to journalism I have carried my LSE experience with me - to good effect, I think! Gender is increasingly discussed in mainstream media and my LSE degree has opened doors professionally and offered me a more nuanced lens through which to view the world.

Kathleen Fincham (MSc Gender, 1998-99)

Since graduation, I have completed my PhD (Education and International Development) at the University of Sussex and taught at IDS, SOAS, UEA and IoE (UCL).  I have also been working as an Education and Development consultant with WUSC, UNICEF, UNGEI, Oxfam Novib, SOFRECO/ Save the Children and UNHCR in Canada, Ghana, Rwanda, Lebanon, oPt, Sudan and Jordan.  I would love to hear what my former classmates have been up to over the years! 

Jacob Breslow (MSc Gender, 2010-11)

After graduating from the University of California Santa Cruz's Feminist Studies and Community Studies programs, I applied to the LSE in hopes of continuing my engagement with feminist and queer theory. The LSE drew me in after I had the opportunity to see Judith Butler speak here; I quickly became aware of the amazing minds and talent that the university, and the Gender Institute specifically, brought in and had as faculty. This MSc program challenged me in extraordinarily productive ways, connecting me to people and epistemologies that have and will proactively shape my thinking and my future career in academia. Jacob is now studying for a PhD at the Gender Institute.

Caroline Paranandi (MSc Gender, 2011-12) After almost a decade working as a journalist in London I took a year out to scratch an academic itch at the LSE Gender Institute. Gender was everywhere in the world, and I was curious to understand more about what it is and how it works. The subject was quite different from my undergrad degree in history and international relations from the University of St Andrews and I was constantly challenged by new ideas, concepts and ways of thinking. Since returning to journalism I have carried my LSE experience with me - to good effect, I think! Gender is increasingly discussed in mainstream media and my LSE degree has opened doors professionally and offered me a more nuanced lens through which to view the world.

hollyRodger_126x120

Holly Rodger (MSc Gender, 2009-10) Studying MSc Gender at the LSE helped me to fill in the gaps in my knowledge that I felt had been left by my BA in Politics, Philosophy and Economics from the University of York. The degree gave me the opportunity to study subjects from a wider range of disciplines than would have been possible at another institution. Both the exceptional teaching staff and the diversity of the students at the Gender Institute created a vibrant atmosphere and close sense of community on the course. My time at the Gender Institute gave me the guidance I needed to build my knowledge as well as the freedom to choose my own direction and make my own mind up.

Zoe Palmer (MSc Gender, 2006-07) is part of the Women's Economic Participation Team in the Government Equalities Office.

Hatty Oliver (MSc Gender, 2005-06) has begun her first year of a PhD at Goldsmiths.

Joanne Kalogeras (MSc Gender, 2004-05) completed her PhD at the Gender Institute.

Liza Taylor (MSc Gender, 2004-05) landed an internship with the UNDP Gender Unit in New York (November 2005).  

Ethel Tungohan (MSc Gender, 2003-04) on 7 September 2006 writes, 'hope you remember me - I was at the LSE from 2003-2004, studying gender. I absolutely loved my time at the department. Soon after graduating, I received a human rights fellowship to work for an NGO in India for a year, and afterwards, worked for a human rights NGO in Geneva and a women's health policy think tank in my hometown of Vancouver. Right now, I am in my first year of the Political Science PhD program at the University of Toronto'.

Jac sm Kee (MSc Gender, 2003-04)  is currently managing the Women's Rights Programme of the Association for Progressive Communications. The Programme looks at internet rights and policy in relation to women's human rights, and aims to strengthen the analysis and activism around how the internet is shaped and imagined through feminist perspectives. Part of the work includes a global campaign called ‘Take Back the Tech!’ that calls for women and girls to take control of the internet to transform power relations and end violence against women, both online and offline. The Programme also publishes an online gender and internet policy resource journal that interrogates emerging issues like access, privacy and surveillance, freedom of expression, transparency in governance and the economy from a gendered lens. 

We welcome contributions and participation in both of these key initiatives. For more information: www.takebackthetech.netwww.genderit.org and www.apc.org

We are quite flexible on the issues so far it is related to gender and internet policy and culture. But if this is too broad as you advice, we also produce thematic/focus editions, every 2nd-3rd months, so the students can either contribute to these or we can think together of particular topics which would resonate with them, for example some hot issues on our radars are currently: mapping of feminist tech efforts, new sustainable development goals, economy and tech (both its neoliberal model as well as emerging alternative economy models) or persisting gender gap in access to the internet.

From Corine Dhondee (MSc Gender, 2003-04) on 21 June 2006 says 'just heard from Hildur, she will be doing a JPO with Unifem in Barbados, and Eirin starts in New York with the UN, Sharifah was offered a position with the UN in Malaysia, and Nanda has a lovely development job in Germany.' 

Manilee Bagheritari (MSc Gender, 2003-04) firstly worked as a research associate at the Gender Equality and Development (GED) section of UNESCO. She did the background research for several publications and the programs at GED; currently she is working  on Culture and HIV/ AIDS programme on/projects dealing with research and training. Here is a co-authored article "Cultures, Conventions, and the Human Rights of Women" published on UNESCO.org about a complex relation between cultural rights and women's. 

Krittika Ghosh (MSc Gender, 2003-04) is currently working as a Community Education and Outreach Coordinator for CONNECT, an organisation working on the prevention of gender based violence and family violence in New York.  She is the coordinator for Queens and a lot of work is providing technical assistance to community based organisations to do work around domestic violence, particularly to immigrant communities and communities of colour. (November 2005)

Tracey Jensen (MSc Gender, 2003-04) is at the Open University, in a PhD with Ros Gill. 

Jitiya Purksametanan (MSc Gender, 2002-03) is now a civil servant, working for the Office of Women's Affairs and Family Relations in the Ministry of Social Development and Human Security in Thailand.

Jane Collier (MSc Gender, 2002-03) is working at the British Dental Association, addressing policies on equality and representation.

Cecilia Roccato (MSc Gender, 2002-03) writes in March 2006, 'Right after leaving LSE I started an internship with the World Food Programme (WFP), a United Nation organization working in emergency situation, based in Rome, Italy. I worked in the WFP Gender Unit, mainly looking for background material for a policy paper on food-assisted training programmes. I knew about the internship thanks to an email you forwarded to us from a former LSE Gender student. After the internship they asked me to stay on and work in a big institutional baseline survey on the implementation of WFP's Gender Policy. For almost 2 years I worked on this project, designing the survey material (questionnaires, training material etc.), training focal points on the survey implementation all around the world, providing support from headquarters and traveling to a number of countries to help them writing reports on the findings of the survey. The work was very interesting and challenging, and I wanted to move further and go to the field. So I applied for a fellowship sponsored by the Italian government and then since January I am in Quito, Ecuador, still working with WFP. I am mainly responsible of an alphabetization project carried out by local government and supported by WFP through food rations given to women to ensure their participation. I am also giving training on Gender and Food Security and Gender and HIV/AIDS. I would love to get in touch with people from my course!! My private email is ceciroccato@hotmail.com'

Gwen Beetham (MSc Gender, 2002-03) is a program associate at the National Council for Research on Women in New York City. She does research and coordinating work for a lot of the programs at NCRW; currently researching for several of their main projects: women leaders in higher education and diversity; economic security of women; government information on/programs dealing with women that have gone missing (in the last couple of years).  Here is a recently published article on salon.com about a report she's been working on regarding the deletion and distortion of information about women from US government websites and publications (read: since the Bush administration!). Gwen joined our PhD programme (October 2007).

Both Carolyn Pedwell (MSc Gender, 2001-02) and Elisabeth Kelan (MSc Gender, 2001-02) have returned to the GI to do PhDs. Elisabeth now is Dr Kelan and is working at London Business School. Carolyn is not only Dr Pedwell but has a postdoc with Sara Ahmed at Goldsmiths (updated in 2006).

Helena Chui (MSc Gender, 2001-02) writes (September 2005), "I'm doing PhD Developmental Psychology, University of Florida. My advisor is Dr. Manfred Diehl and I'm working on studies in older people".

Diana Anders (MSc Gender, 2000-01) is a PhD in the dept of Rhetoric at Berkeley with Judith Butler.

Keiko Noda (MSc Gender, 2000-01) writes in March 02,'I have got into the course I wanted at the university of Tokyo, which is the most prestigious university in Japan. My course starts in April. I will do research on lesbian history in Japan'.

Juliet Mohit-Brown (MSc Gender, 2000-01) will at the end of November be heading back to the Bay Area and getting back involved with girls' education.

Kyra Freestar (MSc Gender, 2000-01) is moving to Seattle in August.

Heidi Schumacher (MSc Gender, 2000-01) is hoped that our alumni from this year will be setting up a network contact list. Should you be from this year and wish to contribute to this listserv, please contact Heidi Schumacher on Heidi_Schumacher@hotmail.com . Heidi Schumacher (1999-01) is three years into her PhD at Minnesota.

Anna Lodge (MSc Gender, 2000-01) is job hunting in the area of politics, political research or women's organisations in London; finally Heidi herself is moving to Minnesota to begin a PhD program in Feminist Studies. Watch this space!

Kristen Stec (MSc Gender, 2000-01) mentioned around this time she was hopefully going to Kosovo for 3 months to work with the Kosovo Women's Initiative on income generating projects.

Attreyee Roy Chowdhury (MSc Gender, 1999-2000) writes (1 June 06) 'I worked in Singapore before taking a Master's degree in Gender Studies at the LSE. A stint as an intern at UNESCO in Paris followed and she is now the Publications In-charge at the Centre de Sciences Humaines (CSH), French Embassy, New Delhi. The CSH is part of the network of research centres of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs.'

Elisabeth Engebretsen (MSc Gender, 1999-2000) was working as an administrative officer at SOAS in the Centre for Asian & African Literatures & is now undertaking a PhD in Anthropology at LSE.

Tameeza Samji (MSc Gender, 1999-2000) writes April 06 'I am (finally) in the last year of my doctoral studies in Psychology in San Francisco. My dissertation is entitled :Bi and in Love; A Phenomenological Inquiry into the Negotiated Committed Couple Relationships of Bisexual Women . I have been awarded a space to present the initial findings of my research at the national annual conferece this summer in New Orleans (APA 2006). I expect to graduate in August of 2007. I will be spending my pre-doctoral internship year working with children and families at a County and Community Health Center north of San Francisco, and plan take an assistantship for my post doctoral work in order to build my private practice. I hope to keep integrating new ways of knowing and understanding into my scholarly and my clinical work.'

Sabine Grenz (MSc Gender, 1999-2000) was recently awarded a PhD.

Josephine Wilson (MSc Gender, 1999-2000) is studied for a PhD at the Gender Institute. 

Krista Orendorff (MSc Gender, 1999-2000) writes 2.7.01: 'I am leaving for Sarajevo in a few days to work as a Junior Professional Consultant (fancy word for intern) with the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). I will be working as part of The Stability Pact Gender Task Force in Bosnia-Herzegovina. I will be spending a few months in Sarajevo with the possibility of moving to Croatia or Slovenia in the fall. Our strategy is to promote women's greater political participation, formulate campaigns for positive action in national electoral legislation to increase women's chances to stand for election and to be elected and strengthen national machinery for gender equality promotion through a variety of concrete programs and positive action measures.

Kathleen Fincham (MSc Gender, 1998-99) writes: "Since graduation, I have completed my PhD (Education and International Development) at the University of Sussex and taught at IDS, SOAS, UEA and IoE (UCL).  I have also been working as an Education and Development consultant with WUSC, UNICEF, UNGEI, Oxfam Novib, SOFRECO/ Save the Children and UNHCR in Canada, Ghana, Rwanda, Lebanon, oPt, Sudan and Jordan.  I would love to hear what my former classmates have been up to over the years!"

Abigail Booth (MSc Gender, 1998-99) is working for an NGO in Sweden.

Justine Sass (MSc Gender, 1998-99) is working at the World Bank.

Dana Malhas (MSc Gender, 1998-99) (dana_khan@unifem.org.jo) writes from Amman (8 January 2004) "I graduated from LSE in 1999 which makes me part of the 1998/1999alumni belonging to the Gender Institute. I just wanted to send some information in hope to get in touch with some of the people I graduated with and hoping to post the information on the web. I have not been in touch with any of the people I have known during my year at the GI, nor have I been back to London to visit LSE which is on my list of things-to-do, hopefully if and when I find the time to do so!

"Since my graduation I have been working at the UNIFEM Arab States Regional Office in Amman which covers 17 countries in the region. I have been holding the post of National Program Officer for almost three years now and I am mainly responsible for managing the projects/programs portfolio that are being implemented in the region on economic security and rights, governance and peace building and women's human rights. It is a great opportunity, and I am enjoying working for and with a group that I belong to, a group that has much potential and passion for change...Arab women. It's only last year that I have started thinking of resuming my studies and maybe get a PhD and I am currently looking for the time to sit and think of what I want to do academically. Who knows! I might be even back at LSE and the GI...two places that are very close to my heart and always on my mind."

Miranda Levey (MSc Gender, 1998-99) has been appointed to the post of administrative officer in LSE External Study.

Louise Nylin  (MSc Gender, 1998-99) was doing an internship at the UNDP in Copenhagen and was applying for another internship with UNIFEM in New York - she's recently been seen in Washington DC so it must have been successful!

Paula Brancker (MSc Gender, 1998-99) is working on a project for the World Bank for the next few months, and then hopefully work with her government on a project on social policy and women's affairs.

Scott Craig (MSc Gender, 1998-99)  is working freelance (journalism mostly) and has a commission from the Electoral Reform Society to write a book about coalition governments, coming out later this year.

Kathleen Fincham (MSc Gender, 1998-99) was working for UNICEF in Accra on a project on the girl-child. She recently visited the GI and promised to send me an update on what she is doing now.

Manuela Colombini (MSc Gender, 1998-99) is working at the UN in Geneva. She was the Information Officer dealing with NGOs. As of December 01, she writes, 'I would like to inform you that I am still in Geneva, but that I have changed job. I now work as Technical Officer (dealing with women's issues and gender perspectives) at the Department of Reproductive Health and Research of the WHO'.

Uzma Hoque (MSc Gender, 1998-99) began a job with Unicef Regional Headquarters in Nepal on 10 January 2000 and is really excited about it.

Roona Simpson (MSc Gender, 1998-99) was recently awarded a doctorate at the Gender Institute (May 2005).

Yasuko Ibuka  (MSc Gender, 1998-99) is applying for an internship at UNICEF in New York.

Hamida Ali (MSc Gender, 1997-98) is working at the Equality Policy Unit as a research officer, for Portsmouth Council.

Erika Franklin (MSc Gender, 1997-98) writes (31/5/05) "I just wanted to let you know that I left investment banking a number of years ago, and you might want to mention on the alumni page that following my undergraduate in film, I am working back in film again and am co-editor and co-owner of London-based media company, Firecracker Media, specialising in East Asian cinema. In addition to organising film festivals and film sales, we publish a monthly online magazine supported by the UK Film Council at: www.firecracker-media.com. Do take a look - and please feel free to amend my alumni destination! (and, of course, help to publicise our magazine!) ;-)" erika@firecracker-media.com

Ximena Corzo (MSc Gender, 1997-98) is (Feb 04) working for the European Union, Andean Programme of Human Rights and Democracy.

Liz Torpey (MSc Gender, 1997-98) is a programme assistant at the Women's Human Rights Programme at Amnesty in New York.

Farhat Bokhari (MSc Gender, 1997-98) recently got a permanent position as the Asia researcher at the Women's Rights Divison of Human Rights Watch in NY. She writes, "I'll be moving to NY sometime in January. At the moment I'm focused on advocacy on two reports by HRW - on violence against women in Pakistan and Thai women trafficked into debt bondage in Japan. I really had a good time at the Institute, and you all contributed to making it a great place where we got to air a lot of theoretically contentious stuff."

Soraya Hassanali (MSc Gender, 1997-98) has completed a stint as an intern at the UN in Brussels working on trade and is at present back in Canada.  Update: passed through London in October 06, saw Hazel.  Now working in Canada as Senior Cabinet Advisor/Conseillère principale aux affaires du Cabinet.

Sarah Johnstone (MSc Gender, 1997-98) is working at Womankind as a policy officer.

Kyoko Shinozaki (MSc Gender, 1996-97) writes in May 2006 'Ever since I received an alumni newsletter, I have always been wanting to get in touch with the GI to let you know my whereabouts. After my MSc, I returned to Japan and proceeded with my Ph.D. in Gender Studies and Sociology at Ochanomizu University in Tokyo. I completed my Ph.D. in September 2000, with a dissertation "Negotiating Citizenship in Transnational Migration: The Case of Filipina and Filipino Migrant Domestic Workers in Germany". After having briefly worked as a collaborator and fundraiser at the University of Frankfurt am Main in Germany, I began to work as Assistant Professor at the Centre for Gender and Diversity, Maastricht University in 2005 (http://www.genderdiversiteit.unimaas.nl/pages/frameset-uk.htm). Last academic year, I developed, coordinated and taught a BA course, "Crucial Differences". I just finished the first year of my assignment and am preparing for the course for next year. During the past yeas, I have remained in contact with Hazel Reeves in Brighton and some others from other departments.'

Bjorg Paulsen  (MSc Gender, 1996-97) is working for the City of Oslo, mainly dealing with problems in the housing programme.

Shiori Watanabe (MSc Gender, 1996-97) has been working for IBM in Japan for 3 years, and recently changed jobs within the company. She writes, "I would like to let you know that my assignment has been changed.which is effective from 1 Sep.I believe that I will be able to put in practice what you have taught to us at LSE in my new tasks.The job mission is quite tough and very challenging, but I am really exciting and enjoying it. We work for the tasks which to rise minorities (such as women, persons with disability and gays and lesbians) and accelerate diversity. Anyway, I just would like to say thank you to you and let you know that study at Gender Institute LSE gave me unlimited possibility and opportunity to my life. I am participating a working group of MITI and making public comments to the government. Moreover, I will be join training with ministry of transportation. Both of them are connected with accessibility and I made (and will make) comments which is based on knowledge from Geography option "women friendly cities". These knowledge is very useful and applicable in many ways."

Nell Stewart (MSc Gender, 1996-97) is working for the Canadian Foreign Service.

Karen Throsby (MSc Gender, 1996-97), Agota Kisimre MSc Gender, (MSc Gender, 1996-97)Rebecca Edwards (MSc Gender, 1996-97), and Silvia Posocco (MSc Gender, 1996-97) are all undertaking research degrees with us, Deborah Smith (MSc Gender, 1996-97) with Sylvia Chant in Geography. Update: Dr Karen Throsby is at present Lecturer in Sociology at LSE Sociology Department and from 2005/6 will be lecturer in sociology at Warwick.  Dr Silvia Posoccois (MSc Gender, 1996-97) at present one of our Tutorial Fellows at the GI.  See year below for recent news on Laura Feeney (MSc Gender, 1996-97)

Sonali Reddy  (MSc Gender, 1996-97) is still at the International Labour Office in Geneva. 'I am now working with their Bureau for Gender Equality, which is challenging. '

Hazel Reeves (MSc Gender, 1996-97) is the manager of 'BRIDGE' at IDS.

Jennifer Gibbs (MSc Gender, 1996-97) recently popped into the Institute to see Hazel (January 2001). She is now based in Abijan on the Ivory Coast with her own African Art business, Prelude SARL, and last year undertook consultancy work with the African Development Bank in Abijan advising on gender policy. It was lovely to see her, and catch up.

Shalini Grover (MSc Gender, 1996-97) is undertaking a PhD at the Center for the Comparative Study of Culture, Development and the Environment at Sussex, focusing on intimate relations in poor communities in North India, after working as a research consultant for the UNED-UK in London, researching on gender and sustainable consumption.

Sita Aripurnami (MSc Gender, 1996-97) [aripurnami@hotmail.com ] writes, 'I am now working as consultant for an institutions call Partnership for Governance Reform. An institutions form by the CGI countries, incl, Great Britain and all manage by the UNDP. So, now I am working on more macro policy issues, than gender issues. But, I will use gender as perspective to enrich my analysis'.

Marina Laudazi (MSc Gender, 1996-97) is working with the UN in Geneva, in the environmental sustainability section, in the gender unit as a consultant.

Briana Barocas (MSc Gender, 1996-97) is assistant director at the Institute of Women and Work at Cornell. She designs, plans and conducts research studies on women's employment and changing workplace issues, as well as write research papers for publication and progress reports, issuing briefs, fact sheets and other reports for dissemination to other organisation and agencies.

Vanessa Arsenault (MSc Gender, 1995-96) is at Law School in Canada.

Laura Feeney (MSc Gender, 1995-96) has recently returned with the family to Silver Springs, Maryland, and hopes to resume her PhD studies in the US next year.

Nazneen Damji (MSc Gender, 1994-95) writes in June 2001: I am working with UNIFEM (UN Development Fund for Women) on their global Gender and HIV/AIDS programme. I used to be with the Economic Empowerment section, then the Asia-Pacific regional section, and am now with gender and HIV/AIDS. We are also working on the issue of gender and HIV/AIDS within the context of conflict. It is obviously a key issue area - which seems to have not been getting as much attention as one would think, given that its gender and unequal power relations that fuel the epidemic. And, so we are looking to make some linkages to researchers in this area.

Kimie Kaneko (MSc Gender, 1994-95) is just about to begin a research project at the University of Tokyo.

Fehmin Shafi (MSc Gender, 1994-95) (nee Farashuddin) recently emailed Hazel (September 07): I wonder if you'll still remember me. I just visited the Gender Institute homepage and realised that I last updated my profile back in 1999! So here's what I've been doing since then: After living in Melbourne for 3 years, I moved to Sydney in January 2002. My first job here was at the Community Services Commission (now part of the Office of the Ombudsman), an independent government watchdog for consumers of community services in New South Wales.

Following an 18 month break after my son Arman's birth, I joined the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales. I was involved in an evaluation of a pilot project which delivered integrated early intervention and prevention programs for mothers from selected culturally diverse communities. I have been at my current role since November 2006. The Office for Women is the key advisor to the New South Wales State Government on policies that impact directly on women. As Senior Project Officer, I manage three major leadership and mentoring programs for young women in the hospitality, public and private sectors. In addition to my work at the Office for Women, I also work as a freelance consultant for Aidcom, an independent regional and non-profit organisation based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Accredited to the United Nations, Aidcom promotes the role of the mass media in strengthening development and participatory democratic processes in developing countries.

Sue Jarman (MSc Gender, 1994-95) qualified as a secondary school teacher and is based at Bishop Reindo School in Guildford.

Cathy Brownjohn, nee Shaw, (MSc Gender, 1993-94) subsequently worked in international student recruitment / press and marketing at SOAS, Cordwainers College and Queen Mary U of L and most recent Communications officer for Thomas Coram research unit, Inst. Of Education. Written articles for various child and health focused journals and now freelance. Recently wrote a joint report for the World Health Organization on HIV/AIDS. Published an article in the Daily Telegraph on Mothering and Education. Married with 2 children, Oliver 2 years and Hannah 6 months.

Liz Rycott (MSc Gender, 1993-94) is still working in horticulture. Our first ever graduate.

MSc Gender (Research)

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Emma Spruce, MSc Gender (Research), Best Overall MSc Result Prize-winner (2009-10) I came to the GI having studied a BA in French and Politics. I suppose what drew me to LSE was the reputation - no matter who I talked to they had heard of the university and I felt that was especially important because Gender Studies wasn't so well known. The best thing about my year there was the people - it felt like an amazing community to be part of and the fact the students were from all over the world really enriched the academic discussions. Emma is now studying for a PhD at the Gender Institute.

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Jacob Breslow, MSc Gender (Research) (2010-11) writes: "After graduating from the University of California Santa Cruz's Feminist Studies and Community Studies programs, I applied to the LSE in hopes of continuing my engagement with feminist and queer theory. The LSE drew me in after I had the opportunity to see Judith Butler speak here; I quickly became aware of the amazing minds and talent that the university, and the Gender Institute specifically, brought in and had as faculty. This MSc program challenged me in extraordinarily productive ways, connecting me to people and epistemologies that have and will proactively shape my thinking and my future career in academia. Jacob is now studying for a PhD at the Gender Institute."

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Alasia Nuti, MSc in Gender (Research), Best Overall MSc Result Prize-winner (2011-12) I came to the GI to study for an MSc in Gender (Research) with a background in philosophy. The year at the GI was challenging but fundamental in my education and personal growth. After having graduated, I started a PhD in political theory at the University of Cambridge, which I am about to complete. I will spend the next year (2015/2016) as a Postdoctoral fellow at the Goethe University in Frankfurt and then I will start a Lectureship in Political Theory at the University of York. I cannot be more grateful to the GI and its staff for all the support they gave me. It was an amazing year in which I learnt so many things and had the opportunity to meet and discuss with students from around the world.

Jennifer Schulte, MSc Gender (Research) (2004-05) is working as Protection Program Intern - Livelihoods with Women's Commission for Refugee Women and Children in New York.

MSc Gender, Policy and Inequalities

Beth Walker, MSc Gender, Policy and Inequalities (2012-13)

Prior to my undergraduate studies I was a full-time elected officer in the student movement. It was this environment which ignited my passion for campaigning for gender equality. After graduating from the University of Manchester with a degree in religion and theology, I was very lucky to be offered a scholarship to study my MSc in gender, poverty and inequalities at the Gender Institute, LSE. The course provided me with the opportunity to study social policy, planning and practice through a critical gendered lens; something which would allow me to fulfil my aspiration to have a career working in gender policy. After graduating I took a position within the UK Civil Service, where I work in the Government Equalities Office on the gender pay gap.

Masreka Khan, MSc Gender, Policy and Inequalities (2011-12)

Following my study at LSE, I have worked with CARE in Bangladesh as Technical Manager of Research and M& E. My work was focused on Food security, Gender issues and Rural development in Bangladesh and Early child marriage in South Asia. My role engaged different ranges of works including conducting research, contributing to project design, impact measurement of current projects, publishing, supervising the team and on top coordinating and ensuring quality of external consultant's works. Currently I work at Erciyes University in Turkey as a Lecturer in Economics department, where I am also engaged as a researcher at African Social and Economic Research centre. Through my research I explore the dynamics of Economic participation, International Development, Migration and Citizenship discourse particularly in light of gender and racial equality.

Lee Chalmers, MSc Gender, Policy and Inequalities part-time (2012-14)

Alongside my degree I worked more or less full time, running a Leadership Development company, which included working on Executive Education Faculty at London Business School and the University Of Chicago Booth School Of Business as well as with my own corporate and personal clients.

I’ve always been interested in gender and feminism and after turning 40 decided to pursue this interest through formal study, which is why I applied to the GI. I’d like to pursue an academic career alongside my work in my 50’s and 60’s and my MSc study was incredibly eye opening and rewarding.

As well as working and studying during my time at the GI I was Vice-Chair of the feminist organization The Fawcett Society. I found my degree useful in thinking through the guidance of this organisation.  Since graduating I have moved to Edinburgh to do a PhD in Sociology at the University there, examining the connection between misogynistic online trolling and women’s participation in public life. I have also set up an organisation called The Parliament Project which trains women to run for political office. 

I have written a book chapter titled 'Implications of Citizenship Discourse on Female Labour Force Participation: a Case Study of Bangladeshi Women in the UK' to be published in the upcoming book Discourse Analysis as a Tool for Understanding Gender Identity, Representation, and Equality by IGI publications USA.

Also I am attending the twentieth anniversary celebration of Women and Gender studies department of the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey in October to present a paper on ‘Women entrepreneurs in selected Muslim countries: a comparative analysis’ from my ongoing research project.

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Amy Mollett, MSc Gender and Social Policy (2009-10)

I came to the GI with a degree in English Language and Gender Studies, and some experience of volunteering in the women's sector, which set me up for studying the interactions of gender and social policy. My dissertation focused on the limited voices of sex workers in policy making and policy consultation exercises. One of the best things about the GI is meeting other students; people from all parts of the world, who I'll be in touch with for a long time, I'm sure. After graduating I started working as a research assistant at the LSE Public Policy Group, an independent consultancy and research organisation.

 

MSc Gender, Media and Culture

Zerrin Cengiz, MSc Gender, Media and Culture (2012-13)

I came to the GI with a BA degree in Political Science and International Relations from Bogazici University, Istanbul. The excellent quality and interdisciplinarity of the education as well as the diversity of the students provided a unique learning opportunity both inside and outside of the classroom which was fun and challenging at the same time. My dissertation focused on the potential to conceptualize the representation of actual spaces as homes and in what ways this representation visually and discursively utilizes gendered connotations with regard to the notion of “home” in transnational cinema. After graduating, I started working as a researcher at the Turkish Economic and Social Studies Foundation (TESEV) in Istanbul, an independent non-governmental think-tank conducting policy-oriented social, political and economic research. At TESEV, I have been mainly working on the subject of Turkish Foreign Policy, especially EU-Turkey relations.

Asiya Islam, MSc Gender, Media and Culture (2009-10)

When I came to London last year to join a one year programme of MSc in Gender, Media and Culture, I had pretty high expectations. And, I am glad to say, the Gender Institute not only fulfilled but went above and beyond those expectations. The reason I decided to study at the LSE Gender Institute was the impressive array of course choices offered by it - I almost felt like the course in Gender, Media and Culture was tailor-made for me! Now that I reflect back on the whole year gone by, I can say with conviction that the decision to attend the LSE Gender Institute was absolutely right. It's hard to say what I enjoyed the most though I think the best part of being at LSE and at the GI was the vibrant academic atmosphere; it was also wonderful to meet fellow gender-academics-in-the-making from all over the world! I ended up writing on the performative nature of stereotypes of Third World women in the UK media, the topic might seem obvious but was actually quite difficult to arrive at. The reason I decided to finalise this for my dissertation was because it gave me scope to explore all the three dimensions of my year long study - gender, media and culture. Having completed my studies, I now work for the LSE Equality and Diversity division. I aspire to go in for journalism in the near future and also plan to embark on a Ph D in a couple of years!

MSc Gender, Development and Globalisation

Taylor Riley, MSc in Gender, Development and Globalisation (2011-12)

Since my degree I completed an internship at a women’s human rights organisation in New Delhi (PWESCR) and did a postgraduate diploma in social science research methods at University of Sussex. I am currently working on my PhD in Media Studies at Bayreuth International Graduate School for African Studies (BIGSAS) in Bayreuth, Germany.  My research focuses on the production of knowledge about women who love other women in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.  At the moment I’m nearing the end of seven months of ethnographic fieldwork in South Africa and will complete my PhD in 2017.   

Minkyu Lee, MSc Gender, Development and Globalisation (2012-13)

Hello, I’m Minkyu Lee, who graduated from the GI on 18th of December, 2013, having successfully completed MSc Gender, Development and Globalisation under the smart teaching and supervision of brilliant GI professors with wonderful friends and colleagues of diversity. After this amazing and valuable one year journey, I started my own exploration to think over how to apply what I have learned from the time being in the GI and how to act upon it. So, I decided to stay at home in Busan, my hometown, for about 6 months, doing domestic work and going on occasional internet activism to understand what it is like to be at home actually. Then, I decide to do a little bit of work outside home by teaching languages to little kids in a local private language institute, which made me go back to where I was before I actually started this journey, where I used to dream about becoming many different figures, jobs and social roles.

With a wake-up call from one friend of mine from those dreamy days, I started to navigate further what I could do with my postgraduate study in Seoul, soul of Asia, and found a women’s non-profit organization called Asia Women bridge DoRunDoRun, where I participated in a beautiful fundraising event night for Nepalese Women as a volunteer, translated documents from its Gender Café in Cambodia and studied together with various women from diverse backgrounds in Korea talking about transnational solidarity in many different lectures organized by it. After that short but quality time and experience, I started looking for an opportunity to experience working in an international organization which has been my dream career destination since my bachelor’s years but not yet realized. With a few failed attempts, my vigorous trying resulted in a finance and administration internship position in the Seoul office of World Food Programme, where I could ponder upon the relations between gender and poverty. I now have finished the internship with so much memory with lovely and trustworthy people I have met there and am looking forward to another journey to come. Whatever the next stage will be, I do know that I can be and do anything if I remember what I have learned and shared with my friends in the GI, and I am happy and proud that I have been and am a part of GI.

Jeanne Firth, MSc Gender, Development and Globalisation (2009-10)

I came to the GI with a Bachelor of Specialised Studies in Peace and Conflict Studies. What I enjoyed most about being at the GI was getting to know the incredible students, staff and faculty. The casual discussions and debates with other students outside of class were just as important as the learning going on inside the classroom. My dissertation focused on the 'obesity epidemic' by examining Michelle Obama's 'Let's Move' childhood obesity prevention campaign. I'm now eager to explore food systems in global context through activism and further academic work.

Nazneen Damni, MSc Gender and Development (1995)

After graduating, Nazneen worked as a researcher for the United Nations Environment Programme in Nairobi, Kenya from 1996-97, assisting in the development of UNEP's strategy on gender equality and the environment. From 1997-98, she was a Programme Officer in the Women's Rights Programme of the INternational Cnetre for Human Rights and Democratic Develpoment in Montreal, Canada, focusing on women's rights in the context of conflict.  This work included monitoring the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.  In 1998, Nazneen started working with the United Nations Development Fund for Women in New York on women's economic secuirty and rights.  She continued working in UNIFEM as a Programme Associate in New York, providing programming support in the area of women's economic security and rights for the Asia-Pacific and Arab States regional programmes.