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Charlotte Milne
Executive MSc Programme Manager
Tel: +44 (0)20 7107 5437
 
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Course Guides and Videos

For module dates please download our schedule

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EU452E Key issues in the Political Economy of Europe

This course forms the core course of the Executive MSc Political Economy of Europe. It tries to understand how the relation between state and economy in both Western Europe and Central and Eastern Europe has evolved over the post-war period. Key debates in this regard include the demise of Keynesianism as fiscal intervention by government and of real existing socialism, as well as the crisis of monetarism. We also examine how the operation of the EU as a whole, the Single Market and the monetary union in particular, interact with the political economy of European states inside and in the neighbourhood of the Community. The course aims to provide students with both an analytical understanding of and a systematic treatment of empirical issues related to the evolution of the European political economy.

Topics include: State and economy in European economies; Economic theory and policy in Europe; The political economy of European integration; EU membership as a reform lever in post-communist Europe and in mature Western welfare states; EU enlargement; Monetary union and its crisis; the evolution of the Single Market.

Teaching

18 x 3 hour seminars.

Coursework

One individual essay, one project, plus a trial examination.

Assessment

One 2,000-2,500 word summative essay (50%) and a take-home exam (50%)

 


EU449E Capitalism and Democracy in Central Europe

The course applies concepts of political economy, economics and political science to its investigation of Central and Eastern Europe’s evolution through post-communist transition to highly open, FDI-dependent emerging markets with ‘European’ expectations of welfare. Placing the region in the comparative context of both the EU15 and comparable emerging markets, the course investigates the ongoing challenges of political and institutional consolidation and the developmental consequences of the liberalization and FDI-led growth model of the1990s/2000s. The course examines the emerging strengths and persistent weaknesses of these political economies and considers their implications for the region’s emerging varieties of capitalism, relative international competitiveness and political stability.

Teaching

9 x 3 hour seminars.

Coursework

One essay.

Assessment

One 2,000-2,500 word summative essay (50%) and a take-home exam (50%)

 


EU443E European Capitalism(s) and the Global Economy

The course consists of two parts. In the first part we will discuss the basic arguments and methodological considerations of the Varieties of Capitalism literature and conduct a comparative analysis of the core issue areas in the political economy of contemporary capitalism: how capital, labour and product markets are structured. The second part will build on these thematic treatments to discuss the structure of and dynamics of the main Western, Southern and Central European models of capitalism.

Teaching

9 x 3 hour seminars.

Coursework

One essay.

Assessment

One 2,000-2,500 word summative essay (50%) and a take-home exam (50%)

 


EU425E Interest Groups, Markets and Democracy

The focus of this course is on the representation of interests in Europe, and their role in Economic policy-making. Students will analyse the main theoretical issues and selected empirical questions on how interests are differently organised across countries and at the EU level, on the interplay between interest representation and electoral politics, and on the policy outcome after interest intermediation. The objective is to understand the dynamics of economic policy-making in comparative perspective, with an emphasis on the globalisation period.

Teaching

9 x 3 hour seminars.

Coursework

One essay.

Assessment

One 2,000-2,500 word summative essay (50%) and a take-home exam (50%)


EU497E DISSERTATION

Students in the Executive MSc Political Economy of Europe are required to write a dissertation on a topic within the field of their programme. Preparation for the Dissertation will commence with a week-long seminar (9 x 3hours) on aspects of research, writing, etc., followed by at least two research proposal drafts within two-month intervals, including (virtual) office hours, leading to a final dissertation project outline after 6 months (from December to July). The dissertation deadline is the second Monday in September of the second year.

 


EU446E Economic Governance of the EMU

The purpose of this course is to analyse the process of European monetary integration and its implications for the institutions of economic governance in the EU. There will be a strong emphasis on using the experience of the financial and economic crises since 2008 as a source of evidence to assess both the performance of EMU and the theories about monetary integration. We consider briefly the political and economic rationale for the establishment of EMU and then examine in detail how these rationales played themselves out in practice (e.g. problems of free-riding, political exchange, information asymmetries between policymakers etc). Indicative questions addressed in this course include: how and why did the EU develop the EMU project?; did economic theories prepare us for the Euro area crisis of 2010-11?; what are the challenges for member states in adjusting to the discipline of the 'Euro-zone'?; what issues arise for the EU in managing relations between member states in the Euro-zone and those outside?; how does the Euro affect the ability of member states to adjust to periods of crisis and to external shocks?; is the sovereign debt crisis of 2010 indicative of imbalances within the EU and basic flaws in its institutional design?

Teaching

9 x 3 hour seminars.

Coursework

One essay.

Assessment

One 2,000-2,500 word summative essay (50%) and a take-home exam (50%)

 


EU453E The Political Economy of Welfare State Reform

The aim of the course is to apply concepts of economics and political economy to social policies in European welfare states. The seminars establish the theoretical context, summarise the findings of quantitative comparative case studies and discuss European experience in the context of broader international experience. They then build on these concepts and apply them to qualitative case studies of welfare state arrangements in member states, considering in particular the role of social policy legislation and coordination at the EU level. The course will provide students with the conceptual and empirical background to enable them to answer questions such as: What does economic theory and political economy tell us about the design of welfare states? How do social policies in European welfare states reconcile equity and efficiency? What drives or stalls reform dynamics in member states? What are the proper boundaries of EU social policy? Is the EU gradually developing into a social union, through international mobility and the portability of social entitlements?

Teaching

9 x 3 hour seminars.

Coursework

One essay.

Assessment

One 2,000-2,500 word summative essay (50%) and a take-home exam (50%)

 

   

 

 

 

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