Re-Visions past events

In this series, we invite a speaker to give two presentations on a topic, allowing speaker and audience to engage with an issue in a more extended way than is possible in a single-session event.

 

Perspectives on Taste: Philosophy and Neuroscience

What do we taste when we bite into an apple, or sip a cup of coffee? Are these just sensations on the tongue, or real flavours of the fruit and drink? Do we taste the same things or do we live in different taste worlds? Are their standards of taste? These lectures will explore the philosophy and neuroscience of taste and what it tells us about perception.

Photo of Barry Smith 


Barry Smith|
, Professor of Philosophy, Birkbeck, University of London and Director of the Institute of Philosophy, School of Advanced Study, University of London

 

  

 

The Nature of Tastes and Tasting

Listen to the podcast|

Thursday 1 December 2011, 6.30 – 8pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

Philosophers used to consider taste to be one of the lower, bodily senses. But we now know that tasting depends on taste, touch and smell. These complex experiences provide a key to the workings of our senses and the nature of perceptual experience.

 

The Philosophy of Wine

Thursday 8 December 2011, 6 – 7.30pm
Room ST274/275, Second Floor, Steward House, London WC1
(Senate House, Access via 32 Russell Square)   

What can you taste in a wine? Does it depend on who tastes it or on how it is tasted?
Is the taste in the glass or in the mind? Can we all taste the same thing? Are there facts about which wines are better than others?

 

Experience and Time

Ian Phillips

 

Ian Phillips|, Lecturer in Philosophy, University College
London and Fellow, All Souls College,
University of Oxford

 

  

Experience of Time: Historical Puzzles about Time Perception

Tuesday 21 June 2011, 6.30 – 8pm Room
NAB.1.07, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Experience in Time: Experimental Psychology and the Stream of Consciousness

Tuesday 28 June 2011, 6.30 – 8pm Room
NAB.1.07, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Philosophers have long struggled to explain temporal experience. In these talks Ian Phillips traceed the roots of this puzzlement and showed how a proper response helps us to engage with various surprising psychological results.  

Self and Others

Kristina Musholt

 

 

Kristina Musholt|, LSE Fellow, Department of Philosophy,
Logic and Scientific Method and Deputy Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

 

 

The Problem of Self-Consciousness

Monday 7 March 2011, 6.30 – 8pm
Room NAB.1.15, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Self-Consciousness and Other Minds

Monday 21 March 2011, 6.30 – 8pm Room
NAB.1.15, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

These talks presented new perspectives on the problem of self-consciousness, and examined the relationship between self-awareness and awareness of other minds. The discussion drew on philosophical considerations as well as on insights from the empirical sciences.

The Unity of Consciousness

Tim BayneMonday 8 November 2010, 6.00 - 7.30pm
Room T206, Lakatos Building, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE

Tim Bayne|, University Lecturer in Philosophy of Mind, University of Oxford and Fellow of St. Catherine's College.

Website|

 

This talk considered various conceptions of the unity of consciousness, and examined arguments for and against the claim that consciousness is necessarily unified.

Consciousness, Zombies, and Agency

Monday 22 November 2010, 6.00 - 7.30pm
Room T206, Lakatos Building, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE

Tim Bayne|, University Lecturer in Philosophy of Mind, University of Oxford and Fellow of St. Catherine's College.

Drawing on philosophy, psychology and neuroscience, this talk examined the role that consciousness might play in agency.

The Unconditional University

Martin McQuillanMartin McQuillan|, Professor of Literary Theory and Cultural Analysis and Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Kingston University

Website|

 

Research Manager

Tuesday 11 May 2010, 6 - 7.30pm
Room G108, 20 Kingsway, LSE

The Dean's Office

Tuesday 18 May 2010, 6 - 7.30pm
Room G108, 20 Kingsway, LSE

Martin McQuillan is a Professor of Literary Theory and Cultural Analysis and has written several books on Jacques Derrida and contemporary philosophy. He is also the Dean of the largest Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences in London. In these talks he reflected on the deconstructive critique of the university at a time of unprecedented turmoil for higher education in the UK. What happens when the 'unconditional university' meets £1 billion of cuts, or, when Jacques Derrida meets Peter Mandelson?

The Neoliberal Subject: on Foucault's 'The Birth of Biopolitics' (1979)

Miguel de Beistegui|, Professor of Philosophy, University of Warwick

Wednesday 3 March 2010, 7.00 - 8.30pm
Room 1.07, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Wednesday 10 March 2010, 7.00 - 8.30pm
Room 1.07, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

The aim of those two lectures, devoted to Foucault's lectures at the Collège de France from 1979 ('The Birth of Biopolitics'), is to re-think the nature of the relation between politics and economics, especially in the context of the current economic and social crisis. Foucault enables us to understand how, and with what consequences, the subject of politics underwent a decisive shift in the 18th century with the emergence of the market and a new type of rationality (political economy). In these talks Miguel de Beistegui  asked if, and how, a phase of re-politicisation can follow the total 'economisation' of contemporary life and if there are alternatives to the neoliberal worldview. 

Rethinking Marxism

Lea YpiLea Ypi, Post-Doctoral Prize Research Fellow, Nuffield College, Oxford

The Philosophy of History

Wednesday 11 November 2009, 6.00 - 7.30pm
Room J116 (Cañada Blanch Room), Cowdray House, European Institute, LSE

Website|

By exploring the analogies between Marx's philosophy of history and the Enlightenment idea of historical progress (in particular the thought of Kant), the first talk aimed to shed light on the Marxist conception of teleology and explored the normative relevance of the idea of class-based historical agency.

The Philosophy of Art

Wednesday 18 November 2009, 6.00 - 7.30pm
Room 1.07, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

After illustrating the transformation of contemporary art in parallel with Marxist critiques of visual art in capitalist societies, this talk explored some features of artistic avant-garde projects and illustrated their enduring vulnerability to economic manipulation and political instrumentalization.

Democracy Beyond Aggregation?

Jonathan WhiteJonathan White, Lecturer in European Politics, European Institute, LSE

The Concept of Public Opinion

Thursday 14 May 2009, 6.00 - 7.30pm
Room J116 (Cañada Blanch Room), Cowdray House, European Institute, LSE

The Concept of the Political Party

Tuesday 19 May 2009, 6.00 - 7.30pm
Room J116 (Cañada Blanch Room), Cowdray House, European Institute, LSE

Website |

These talks explored conceptually two central features of modern democracy: public opinion and the political party. Both are widely conceived in terms of the aggregation of units, be it opinions, preferences, interests, or another. In discussion we examined some of the presuppositions of such accounts, whether there exist alternatives, and whether these alternatives are recommendable.

The Actor and the Audience in the Theatre

Aoife MonksAoife Monks, Lecturer in Theatre Studies, School of English and Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London

Website|

The History of the Actor

CANCELLED - Tuesday 3 February 2009, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Room H102, Connaught House, Aldwych, LSE

The History of the Actor

Tuesday 24 February 2009, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Room H102, Connaught House, Aldwych, LSE

The Actor and Identity

Tuesday 10 March 2009, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Room H102, Connaught House, Aldwych, LSE

These talks considered the question: 'what might an actor be?' and answered this question in three ways by: considering the actor historically, looking at the actor's embodiment of identity, and by thinking about the actor on the 20th Century stage. The discussion considered some case-studies, such as the belief systems underlying approaches to actor training; anti-theatricality; the relationship between the actor and the fashion system; the history of racial representation in the theatre; and the attempts by modernist and avant-garde artists to exclude the actor's body from performance. A consideration of histories and theories of the actor helps us to think about theatre's social function, and the audience's role in the theatre event.

International Distributive Justice, Reciprocity, and the European Union

Andrea SangiovanniAndrea Sangiovanni, Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, King's College London

Website|

 

 

The Role of Facts

Tuesday 21 October 2008, 6.30-8pm
Room G108, 20 Kingsway, LSE

Equality, Reciprocity, and the State

Tuesday 4 November 2008, 6.30-8pm
Room G108, 20 Kingsway, LSE

Solidarity in the European Union

Tuesday 18 November 2008, 6.30-8pm
Room G108, 20 Kingsway, LSE

In response to economic, social, and political pressures originating from both within and outside their borders, European states have progressively re-negotiated the terms in which they exercise legal and political authority over their territories. As a result of this process, the exercise of authority is now carried out increasingly at trans-, inter-, and supra-national levels. This poses a fundamental question for political thought. Do the new circumstances in which states operate require a reassessment of our understanding of distributive justice? In this series of talks, Andrea Sangiovanni| will argue for three interconnected claims.

First, that facts about political and social institutions should affect not only the implementation of principles of justice but also, and more controversially, their content, scope, and grounds.

Second, that equality as a demand of justice only applies among citizens and residents of a state. This is not because citizens and residents share a collective identity, or because they are subject to the same coercive power, but because they share in the mutual provision of the collective goods necessary for a flourishing life. Equality is therefore best understood as a demand of reciprocity.

Third, this reciprocity-based conception of distributive justice can be extended to the inter-, trans-, and supra-national level. Despite the fact that equality is a demand of justice only among citizens and residents of a state, this does not imply that we have no obligations of distributive justice beyond the state. It only implies that these will be different in both form and content from those we have at the domestic level. The third claim is developed in the institutional context of the European Union.

Marking the death of the great provocateur and re-visionist thinker Richard Rorty we dedicated two parts of our programme to an assessment of his work. Our Provocations series and Re-Visions series were, during the Summer term 2008, on and in honour of his contribution to our philosophical culture

Neil GascoigneThursdays, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Room J116 (Cañada Blanch Room), Cowdray House, European Institute, LSE

Neil Gascoigne, Principal Lecturer in Philosophy, Roehampton University

Website|

No Single Vision: Autobiography, Politics, and Philosophy

Thursday 15 May 2008

Out of Mind

Thursday 29 May 2008

Philosophy and the Idea of America

Thursday 12 June 2008

In these talks, Neil Gascoigne| explores the development and implications of Richard Rorty's neo-pragmatism. The first talk uses Rorty's autobiographical fragment "Trotsky and the Wild Orchids" to introduce his conception of the relationship between philosophy and politics, and what he takes to be the consequent task for the contemporary intellectual.

The second talk turns to Rorty's earliest work in the philosophy of mind and shows how his subsequent 'turn' against materialism leads to his non-Realist views on truth and objectivity, views he regarded as important for the renewal of the enlightenment project.

The final talk looks at how much pragmatism, as a philosophical movement, constitutes a self-conscious break with the 'authority' of the European tradition. The issue this raises is the extent to which it is tied to a specifically American conception of democracy, thus raising the question: 'of what use is pragmatism to we Europeans?'

Room J116 (Cañada Blanch Room), Cowdray House, European Institute, LSE

Michael MackMichael Mack, Theology & Religious Studies Department, University of Nottingham

Website|

 

New Nature (Spinoza)

Thursday 28 February 2008, 6.30 - 8.00pm

New History (Herder)

Thursday 6 March 2008, 6.30 - 8.00pm

New Science (Freud)

Thursday 13 March 2008, 6.30 - 8.00pm

In these talks, Michael Mack|, from the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Nottingham, uncovers visions of European modernity that embrace rather than reject cultural diversity and the plurality of nature. In the first talk he discusses how Spinoza's notion of self-preservation encloses in itself the blueprint for a cooperative conception of society. Spinoza emerges as a thinker who offers an alternative to narrowly rationalist and anti-naturalist Cartesian and Kantian understandings of modernity. The second talk focuses on how the philosopher Herder creatively reconfigured Spinozist thought in his critique of goal oriented perceptions of history as well as in his various controversies with what he thought to be monolithic formations within the eighteenth century enlightenment. The third talk discusses how Freud's development of his new science (psychoanalysis) revalues what the old Cartesian and Kantian science devalues: history's untidy and disorderly development as well as nature's diverse and contingent composition.

Hurricane Katrina: Natural and Social Aspects

John Protevi, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of French Studies, Louisiana State University

In these talks, John Protevi|, from the Department of French Studies at Louisiana State University, discusses the natural and social aspects of Hurricane Katrina, using concepts derived from the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. In the first talk, he shows how in their ontology a hurricane is a paradigm example of the way complex systems organize themselves. In the second talk, he uses their political philosophy to discuss the racialized panic by which government officials stopped the ongoing rescue effort of and by fellow citizens in favour of occupying New Orleans by force in a military operation.

Monday 26 November 2007, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Room D502, Clement House, LSE

Monday 10 December 2007, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Room D502, Clement House, LSE

Share:Facebook|Twitter|LinkedIn|