Public Lectures Past Events

 

The Infrastructure of Democracy

This event is jointly organised with the Institute of Philosophy, School of Advanced Study, University of London|

Wednesday 29 October 2014, 6.30 – 8pm
Senate Room, first floor, Senate House, London WC1E 7HU   

Philip Pettit|, Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Human Values, Princeton University and Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Australian National University  

Chair: Gabriel Wollner|, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE and Forum for European Philosophy Fellow

Democracy, at its best, requires the demos or people to have kratos or control. Since control involves not just influencing policy but also shaping it, democracy in this sense is a very rich ideal; it requires people to have an equally accessible form of influence that imposes on government policy an equally acceptable shape. Yet there are institutions that can deliver that result. They implement a modern version of the old republican ideal of a mixed constitution and a contestatory citizenry.

 

On Making a Difference and Choosing a Career

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Tuesday 3 June 2014, 6.30-8pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE   

WillMacAskill 

William MacAskill|, Research Associate, Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, University of Oxford and President of 80,000 Hours ethical career advisory service  

Chair: Gabriel Wollner|, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE and Forum for European Philosophy Fellow  

How can an individual do the most good in their lifetime? Should they work for a non-profit organization in Africa? Should they go into politics? Or should they go into the City, and try to earn as much as they can so that they can donate it to good causes? Philosopher and founder of the ethical career advisory service ‘80,000 hours’ William MacAskill discussed questions of effective altruism and how to use one’s life to make the world a better place.

 

Inventing the Individual: The Origins of Western Liberalism

Wednesday 29 January 2014, 6.30-8pm
New Theatre, East Building, LSE   

LarrySiedentop 

 

Larry Siedentop|, Emeritus Fellow, Keble College, University of Oxford

 

  

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Associate Professor of European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy  

Marking the publication of Larry Siedentop’s new book, Inventing the Individual: The Origins of Western Liberalism, this lecture asked us to rethink the evolution of the ideas on which states in the West are built. There are large parts of the world – fundamentalist Islam; quasi-capitalist China – where other belief systems flourish. Faced with these challenges, understanding our own ideas' origins is more than ever an important part of knowing who we are.  

 

The Nature of Existence

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Tuesday 8 October 2013, 6.30-8pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE 

 TimCrane(1) 

 

Tim Crane|, Knightbridge Professor of Philosophy, University of Cambridge  

 

 

 

Chair: Danielle Sands|, Visiting Lecturer, Department of English, Queen Mary University of London and Forum for European Philosophy Fellow  

'The nature of existence' is a phrase that will mean different things to different people. To some it will bring to mind the question of the nature of our own existence. This lecture was not about that important question, but about another one: the nature of existence as such. What is it for anything at all to exist? Tim Crane addressed this question by contrasting existence with non-existence, and contrasting the kinds of properties existing and non-existing things have. He rejects the claim, deriving from Descartes and Malebranche, that nothingness can have no properties, and instead he argued that non-existing things can only have properties of one distinctive kind. This marks a difference with existing things, and tells us something about the nature of existence.

 

Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking

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This event is jointly organised with the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science|  and the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method|

Thursday 23 May 2013, 6.30-8pm
Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE  

DanielDennet


Daniel Dennett|
, University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy, and Co-Director of the Center for Cognitive Studies, Tufts University 

 

Chair: Christian List|, Professor of Political Science and Philosophy, LSE

In this lecture, one of the world’s most original thinkers showed how he designs, uses, and dismantles the thinking tools that have illuminated his theories of meaning, mind, and evolution. The big difference between human minds and the minds of other animals is our equipping ourselves with literally hundreds of thinking tools—cultural software that we install in our brains much the way we download Java applets to our laptops and smart phones. Some of these tools are as simple as labels or metaphors, and others are sophisticated intuition pumps—persuasion-machines that can delude us if we're not careful.

 

Cultural Evolution: from memetic evolution to intelligent design

This event is jointly organised with the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science, LSE |

Wednesday 20 March 2013, 12.30-2pm
Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE    

 DanielDennet

Daniel Dennett|, University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy, and Co-Director of the Center for Cognitive Studies, Tufts University

 

Chair: Kristina Musholt|, LSE Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method and Deputy Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

Homo sapiens is the first species of intelligent designers to evolve by natural selection, a cascade of processes that works without any help from an intelligent designer. How was this possible? Cultural evolution is the key innovation; it began as a purely Darwinian process of natural selection of memes, but has spawned successor processes of invention that are ever less Darwinian, ever more foresighted and purposeful.   

 

Why Painting Matters

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Slides|

Thursday 14 March 2013, 6.30-8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE   

 DavidFerris(1)

 

David Ferris|, Professor of Humanities and Comparative Literature, University of Colorado at Boulder  

 

 

Chair: Jonathan Lahey Dronsfield|, Reader in Theory and Philosophy of Art, University of Reading

Ever since the 19th century painting has had to survive in a world whose sense of the visual image has been transformed radically by photography and its digital heirs. In a presentation of paintings and writings from the work of Francis Bacon and Gerhard Richter, this lecture argued that painting, instead of retreating from the transformation announced by photography has now become its most important interpretation.

 

Natural-Born Cyborgs? Reflections on Bodies, Minds, and Human Enhancement

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Monday 25 February 2013, 6.30 – 8pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE   

 AndyClark

Andy Clark|, Professor of Philosophy and Chair in Logic and Metaphysics, University of Edinburgh   

 

Chair: Kristina Musholt|, LSE Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method and Deputy Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

We are entering an age of widespread human enhancement. The technologies range from wearable, implantable, and pervasive computing, to new forms of onboard sensing, thought-controlled equipment, prosthetic legs able to win track races, and on to the humble but transformative iPhone. This gives us a new opportunity to look at ourselves, and to ask the fundamental question: Where does the mind stop, and the rest of the world begin? 

 

How to be Finite Without Being Second-Rate

Tuesday 23 October 2012, 6.30 – 8pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

JosephSchear(1)

 

 

Joseph Schear|, University Lecturer and Tutorial Fellow in Philosophy, Christ Church, University of Oxford  

 

 

  

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

We are, according to tradition, finite beings, with finite intellects, cut to a measure forever beyond our reach. Kant and then Heidegger broke with tradition: our finitude is not a lack or a privation but something positive, something that enables.
 

Singing Neanderthals? The Evolution of Music and Language

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Tuesday 22 May 2012, 6.30-8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

StevenMithen


Steven Mithen|
, Professor of Early Prehistory and Pro-Vice Chancellor, University of Reading. He is the author of The Singing Neanderthals: The Origins of Music, Language, Mind, and Body

 

 

 

Chair: Kristina Musholt|, LSE Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method and Deputy Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

The relationship between music and language has been discussed by philosophers ever since Giambattista Vico in the 17th century, and probably before. Today many disciplines contribute to this debate, notably neuroscience and comparative ethology. This lecture brought a perspective from archaeology, interpreting the artefacts and fossils of our extinct stone-age ancestors and relatives. It found that they may have been singing long before they were speaking.

Re-Thinking Alienation

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Tuesday 13 March 2012, 6.30-8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE 

Rahel Jaeggi




Rahel Jaeggi|
, Professor for Practical Philosophy,Department of Philosophy, Humboldt University of Berlin

 

 

Chair: Kristina Musholt|, LSE Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method and Deputy Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

Does modern society cause us to be alienated from ourselves? This lecture argued that a re-thinking of the recently neglected philosophical concept of alienation can provide us with an important resource for social critique.

 

Religion for Atheists

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Thursday 2 February 2012, 6.30-8.00pm
Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE
Alain de Botton|

 

Alain de Botton|, author of non-fiction essays on themes ranging from love and travel to architecture and philosophy. He founded The School of Life www.theschooloflife.com| and Living Architecture www.living-architecture.co.uk|

 

 

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

Is it possible to remain a committed atheist but nevertheless benefit from the wisdom of religion? Marking the publication of his new book Religion for Atheists, Alain de Botton argued that religion still has some very important things to teach the secular world even if we reject its supernatural claims. He proposed that we look to religions for insights into how we might live in and arrange our societies.

 

Beyond the Eye of the Beholder

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Tuesday 17 January 2012, 6.30-8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE 

Guy Dammann


Guy Dammann
|
, music critic of the Times Literary Supplement, and a critic and commentator for The Guardian. He teaches at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

 

 

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

It is a truism to assert that judgements about art and beauty are subjective. That such judgements are relative, accountable solely to direct personal experience, has long been axiomatic to the philosophy, criticism and practice of art. Guy Dammann argued that we now exaggerate this degree of relativity, and do so at the expense of artistic experience. In particular, we misunderstand the meaning of criticism if we consider it purely as the expression of personal preference rather than as a vehicle for renegotiating the relation between individual sensibility and the values enshrined in culture. Art has the power to change us for the better, but only when we agree to meet it half-way.

 

The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized

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Wednesday 11 January 2012, 6.30-8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE 

Owen Flanagan



Owen Flanagan
|
, James B. Duke Professor of Philosophy, Duke University 

 

 

 

Chair: Kristina Musholt|, LSE Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method and Deputy Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

Many Westerners with spiritual (but not religious) inclinations are attracted to Buddhism. But Buddhism is hardly naturalistic. Atheistic when it comes to a creator god, Buddhism is otherwise opulently polytheistic, with spirits, protector deities, ghosts, and evil spirits. Its beliefs include karma, rebirth, nirvana, and nonphysical states of mind. Can we subtract these elements from Buddhism and thereby discover a comprehensive philosophy that is compatible with the rest of knowledge and can point us to a path of human flourishing?

  

Extended Selves

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Monday 10 October 2011, 6.30-8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

Photo of Katalin Farkas

 



Katalin Farkas|,
Professor of Philosophy, Central European University, Budapest

 

 

 

 

Chair: Kristina Musholt|, LSE Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method and Deputy Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

Our iphones, diaries, computers or collaborators are extensions of our minds, according to a widely discussed philosophical argument. This lecture investigated the significance of this claim in our understanding of the notion of a self. 

 

The Most Human Human: A Defence of Humanity in the Age of the Computer

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Wednesday 4 May 2011, 6.30-8pm
 Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

Brian Christian


Brian Christian|
, Author and Poet. He holds a dual degree in computer science and philosophy and an MFA in poetry

 

 

Author Brian Christian talked on the subject of his debut book The Most Human Human a superbly engaging re-evaluation of what it means to be human in the light of breathtaking advances in artificial intelligence.

 

Zero Degrees of Empathy: A New Theory of Human Cruelty

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Tuesday 3 May 2011, 6.30-8.00pm
Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

Simon Baron Cohen

Simon Baron-Cohen| is Professor of Developmental Psychopathology at the University of Cambridge and Fellow at Trinity College, Cambridge. He is Director of the Autism Research Centre (ARC) in Cambridge

 

Simon Baron-Cohen, expert in autism and developmental psychopathology, discussed recent discoveries on the importance of empathy for understanding human cruelty. His new book Zero Degrees of Empathy: A New Theory of Human Cruelty presents a new way of understanding what it is that leads individuals to treat others inhumanely, and challenges all of us to consider replacing the idea of evil with the idea of an empathy deficit.

 

Some Mistakes about Preferences

This event is jointly organised with the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE

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Monday 13 December 2010, 6-7.30pm
NAB.1.07, New Academic Building, LSE

Daniel Hausman|, Herbert A. Simon Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Preferences are the central notion in mainstream economic theory, yet economists say little about what preferences are. This talk argued that preferences in mainstream positive economics are comparative evaluations with respect to everything relevant to value or choice, and it argued against three mistaken views of preferences: (1) that they are matters of taste, concerning which rational assessment is inappropriate, (2) that preferences coincide with judgments of expected self-interested benefit, and (3) that preferences can be defined in terms of choices.

The Quest for Meaning

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Monday 18 October 2010, 6.30-8.00pm
LSE campus, venue confirmed on ticket release date

Tariq Ramadan|, Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies, University of Oxford and Senior Research Fellow at Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan.

 

Tariq RamadanTariq Ramadan| is Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies at Oxford University, Oriental Institute, St Antony's College. He is also teaching at the Faculty of Theology at Oxford. He is at the same time Senior Research Fellow at Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan. Through his writings and lectures he has contributed substantially to the debate on the issues of Muslims in the West and Islamic revival in the Muslim world. He is active both at the academic and grassroots levels lecturing extensively throughout the world on social justice and dialogue between civilisations. Professor Tariq Ramadan is currently President of the European think tank: European Muslim Network (EMN) in Brussels.

 

In this public lecture Tariq Ramadan, philosopher and Islamic scholar talked about his new book 'The Quest for Meaning' in which he invites the reader to join him on a journey to the deep ocean of religious, secular, and indigenous spiritual traditions to explore the most pressing contemporary issues. Along the way, Ramadan interrogates the concepts that frame current debates including: faith and reason, emotions and spirituality, tradition and modernity, freedom, equality, universality, and civilization. He acknowledges the greatest flashpoints and attempts to bridge divergent paths to a common ground between these religious and intellectual traditions. He calls urgently for a deep and meaningful dialogue that leads us to go beyond tolerant co-existence to mutual respect and enrichment.

 

Counter-Composition: Conversations on Ethics

This event was jointly organised with LSE Arts

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Wednesday 17 February 2010, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Alex Voorhoeve|, Senior Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE

Steve Pyke|, leading portrait photographer

 

Alex Voorhoeve

Alex Voorhoeve| is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at LSE. He has published on moral psychology and on ideals of equality, responsibility and well-being. Conversations on Ethics (OUP, 2009), which collects dialogues with eleven leading thinkers, is his first book

 

 

 

Steve Pyke

Steve Pyke| is one of the world's leading portrait photographers. His work was selected this year for the Portraiture Now exhibit at the National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C.; he has been staff photographer for the New Yorker since 2004. He has published eight books, including the famous collection Philosophers. Steve supplied the portraits for Conversations on Ethics.

The evening contained two lectures. Alex Voorhoeve assessed and expanded on Plato's arguments for the use of dialogue in ethical enquiry. True to the spirit of these arguments, the lecture engaged the audience in exchanges about a series of moral cases. Our judgments in these cases, Voorhoeve claims, help characterize the moral point of view.

Steve Pyke discussed the idea of his portraiture as 'an investigation into the nature of being'. His lecture explored his investigation into the nature of being a philosopher. Pyke also explained how he approaches his subjects, how he chooses from among his photographs and what his portraits reveal about them.

 

Kant's Two Cosmopolitanisms and Freedom of Speech

Wednesday 2 December 2009, 12.30-2.00pm
Room NAB 1.07, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Peter Niesen|, Professor of Political Theory and History of Ideas, Institute for Politics, Technische Universität Darmstadt

Peter Niesen

Peter Niesen| is Professor of Political Theory and History of Ideas at the Institute for Politics in the Technische Universität Darmstadt. He has worked on political liberty in contemporary debates and in enlightenment thought (Kant, Bentham). He is a member of the Frankfurt-based research cluster on the Formation of Normative Orders.

 

 

Immanuel Kant's work on freedom of speech is not among the best-known parts of his philosophy, but has much to offer today's discussions. Among his various arguments, two seem based on a cosmopolitan conception of free expression. Kant argues that the public use of reason should be free among cosmopolitan citizens, and that people have cosmopolitan rights to make communicative claims on others. Yet it is unclear what the relation between these two arguments is, and how they can contribute to today's debates on the freedom of border-crossing communication.

 

The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work

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Thursday 26 November 2009, 6.30-8.00pm
Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House, LSE

Alain de Botton|, Philosopher, Author and Entrepreneur

 

Alainde BottonAlain de Botton| was born in Zurich, Switzerland in 1969 and now lives in London. He is a writer of essayistic books that have been described as a 'philosophy of everyday life'. He's written on love, travel, architecture and literature. His books have been bestsellers in 30 countries. He also started The School of Life  www.theschooloflife.com|  and Living Architecture www.living-architecture.co.uk|. Alain started writing at a young age. His first book, Essays in Love [titled On Love in the US], was published when he was twenty-three.

 

We spend much of our lives at work - but surprisingly little gets written about what makes work both one of the most exciting and most painful of all our activities. The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work (Hamish Hamilton, 2009) is an exploration of the joys and perils of the modern workplace, evoking what other people get up to all day - and night - to make the frenzied contemporary world function. With a philosophical eye and his characteristic combination of wit and wisdom, Alain leads us on a journey around a deliberately eclectic range of occupations, from rocket science to biscuit manufacture, accountancy to art - in search of what make jobs either fulfilling or soul-destroying. The talk amounts to a celebration and investigation of an activity as central to a good life as love - but which we often find remarkably hard to reflect on properly. As Alain points out, most of us are still working at jobs chosen for us by our sixteen-year-old selves. Here is the perfect guide to the vicious anxieties and enticing hopes thrown up by our journey through the working world.

 

The Strange Friendship of Pauli and Jung: When Physics Met Psychology

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Wednesday 7 October 2009, 6.30-8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Arthur I. Miller|, Emeritus Professor of History and Philosophy of Science, University College London

 

Arthur L MillerArthur I. Miller| is Emeritus Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at University College London. He is fascinated by the nature of creative thinking and, in particular, in creativity in art (on the one hand) and science (on the other). What are the similarities, what are the differences? He is the author of Einstein, Picasso, which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and Empire of the Stars, which was short listed for the 2006 Aventis Prize for Science Books. Deciphering the Cosmic Number: The Strange Friendship of Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Jung was published in April 2009

 

At a key time in his scientific development, Pauli was undergoing analysis by Jung. What can we learn about Pauli and his scientific discoveries from Jung's analysis of his dreams? A very different Pauli emerges, one at odds with esteemed colleagues such as Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg.

 

What Makes Heroes?

Monday 29 June 2009, 6.30-8pm
Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House, LSE

Susan Neiman

Susan Neiman| is director of the Einstein Forum. Born in Atlanta, Georgia, Neiman studied philosophy at Harvard and the Freie Universität Berlin, and taught philosophy at Yale and Tel Aviv University. She is the author of Slow Fire: Jewish Notes from Berlin, The Unity of Reason: Rereading Kant, Evil in Modern Thought and Moral Clarity: A Guide for Grown-up Idealists.

 

This event marked the launch of Susan Neiman's latest book, Moral Clarity (2008, New York: Harcourt). Susan Neiman is a moral philosopher and one of the most distinguished scholars writing today. As director of the Einstein Forum she is used to asking big questions and making the tools of her academic discipline relevant to the average, thinking citizen. In Moral Clarity: A Guide for Grown-Up Idealists, Neiman shows how the resources of the eighteenth century Enlightenment (David Hume, Adam Smith, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Immanuel Kant) can help us to reconstruct a progressive politics. In her commitment to reason and the facts of the world, in her brilliant readings of the Western canon, and above all in her fierce commitment to politics as a moral endeavour, Neiman makes it possible to believe that the Enlightenment is not yet exhausted and that we are free to join it if we wish.

 

Religion and the Market: Are they in conflict?

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Monday 1 June 2009, 6.30-8.00pm
Old Theatre, Old building, LSE

John Micklethwait
John Micklethwait|, Editor of The Economist and co-author of God is Back (Penguin, 2009).

Discussant: John Gray|, Emeritus Professor of European Thought at the University of London and author of Gray's Anatomy (Penguin, 2009).

 

The global revival of religion has been predominantly fuelled by the creation of a religious free market defined by entrepreneurship, choice and personal revelation. So can religion and the market sit together? What can economics teach us about religion?

 

The Democratic Trilemma

**** EVENT POSTPONED****

Thursday 7 May 2009, 6.30-8.00pm
Alumni Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Christian List|, Professor of Political Science and Philosophy, LSE

Christian List
Christian List| is Professor of Political Science and Philosophy at the London School of Economics. His works in social choice theory, political philosophy, formal epistemology and the philosophy of social science. A graduate of the University of Oxford, he held research and visiting positions at Oxford, the Australian National University, MIT, Harvard, Princeton and the University of Konstanz. He was awarded a Nuffield Foundation New Career Development Fellowship in 2005, and a Philip Leverhulme Prize in Philosophy in 2007. He is currently one of the editors of Economics and Philosophy. His webpage with links to downloadable papers is available at: http://personal.lse.ac.uk/list/|

Collective decisions arise almost everywhere in contemporary societies. Examples are not only elections and referenda, but also decisions in legislatures, multi-member courts, organizations, clubs, firms, expert panels and monetary policy committees. Can we design an ideal democratic procedure for making such decisions? In this lecture, Christian List showed that, for all but the simplest collective decision problems, no decision procedure can simultaneously meet three intuitively appealing principles of democracy: the demands of 'pluralism', 'majoritarianism' and 'rationality'. However, any two of the three principles can be met at once. Professor List calls this problem the 'democratic trilemma' and argues that different approaches to democratic decision-making can be viewed as different attempts to solve the trilemma. Thus the trilemma suggests a map of the logical space in which different approaches to democracy are located.

 

The Subject of Politics: From Foucault to Political Philosophy

This event is jointly organised with the LSE Law Department Legal Theory Subject Group

Wednesday 6 May 2009, 12.30-2.00pm
Thai Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Martin Saar|, Assistant Professor at the Institute for Political Science, Frankfurt University

As the 25th anniversary of Michel Foucault's death (in June 1984) approaches, now is an appropriate time to assess his intellectual legacy. In this lecture, Martin Saar  considered the impact of Foucault's work on the conceptualization of politics, and in particular whether his conception of political subjectivity and his social ontology enable a distinctive mode of political inquiry.

Martin Saar| is assistant professor at the Institute for Political Science at Frankfurt University, where his areas of specialisation include contemporary political theory and philosophy, the history of political thought and Critical Theory. In 2006 he was a Theodor Heuss lecturer/visiting assistant professor at the New School for Social Research, New York. He is the author of Genealogie als Kritik: Geschichte und Theorie des Subjekts nach Nietzsche und Foucault [Genealogy as Critique: History and Theory of the Subject after Nietzsche and Foucault] (Campus Verlag 2007), and has edited several selections of Michel Foucault's works in German, as well as volumes on collective memory and aesthetics.

 

Reflections on the Revolution in Europe:
Can Europe be the same with different people in it?

FT Business - LSE European Institute The Future of Europe Lecture series in association with the Forum for European Philosophy

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Tuesday 5 May 2009, 6.30-8.00pm
Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House, LSE

Christopher Caldwell 



Christopher Caldwell|, senior editor at The Weekly Standard, regular contributor to The Financial Times and author of Reflections on the Revolution in Europe: Islam, Immigration and the West (Doubleday, 2009)

 

 

After a half-century of mass immigration, has Europe overestimated the need for immigrant labour and underestimated the culture-shaping potential of religion?

 

The Incompatibility of Science and Religion

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Wednesday 21 January 2009, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Room U8, Tower One, LSE

John Worrall

 

John Worrall|, Professor of Philosophy of Science, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE

 

 

Galileo was put under house arrest by the Inquisition for defending Copernicus. If religious fundamentalists had their way, Darwinian theory would (at best) be taught as one theory among many with no greater claim to rational assent than the theory that God created the universe essentially as it now is in roughly 4004BC. More sophisticated thinkers hold that such direct clashes between science and religion are quite unnecessary: that one can be a religious believer without coming into the slightest conflict with science. John Worrall examined various ways in which this compatibility view has been defended. This examination showed that while religion and science can indeed avoid direct conflict, there is ineliminable conflict between religion and the general scientific approach - an approach based on the axiom that it is reasonable to believe only what evidence gives you reason to believe. 

 

Philosophy and Literary Theory:

'Where Ignorance is Bliss': Folly and Family Secrets

Thursday 15 May 2008, 6.00-7.30pm 

University of York

Rachel Bowlby 



Rachel Bowlby|, Professor of Modern English Literature, University College London

 

 

 

 

 

Lecture Series:

Law, Reason, Violence

LSE Law Department and Forum for European Philosophy

Law, Reason and Ideology

Sean CoyleMonday 10 March 2008, 6.00-7.30
Room D702, Clement House, LSE

Sean Coyle|, Reader in Jurisprudence at the Faculty of Laws, University College London.

His latest book is entitled From Positivism to Idealism (Ashgate, 2007).

 

Law and Violence

Maeve CookeMonday 25 February 2008, 6.00-7.30
Room D702, Clement House, LSE

Maeve Cooke|, Professor at University College Dublin, School of Philosophy

Her works include: Re-Presenting the Good Society (MIT Press, 2006) and Language and Reason: A Study of Habermas's Pragmatics (MIT Press, 1994). 

 

Military Neo-Liberalism, Neo-Leninism and Neo-Anarchism

Simon CritchleyMonday 11 February 2008, 6.00-7.30
Room D602, Clement House, LSE

Simon Critchley|, Professor at the New School for Social Research, New York.

His books include Infinitely Demanding: Ethics of Commitment, Politics of Resistance (Verso, 2007) and The Ethics of Deconstruction: Derrida and Levinas (Blackwell, 1992).

 

 

Another European Tradition: Traceability of the Social and the Vindication of Gabriel Tarde

Bruno LatourLSE European Institute, Sciences Po Paris, Forum for European Philosophy, French Embassy:   2008 Franco - British Europe dialogue series

Monday 4 February 2008, 6:30-8:00pm
Old Theatre, LSE

Professor Bruno Latour
Chair: Professor Nikolas Rose

A rival of Durkheim, Gabriel Tarde was right to argue that the subject-matter of sociology is not society but connections. The understanding of the social cannot be separated from the study of other associations like biological organisms or even atoms.

Bruno Latour| is a philosopher and a sociologist, currently Vice - President for Research of Sciences Po

 

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