Oxford Forum Past Events

   

Oxford Forum Symposium
Issues in Metaphysics: Modality and Ineffability 

Friday 7 March 2014
Regent’s Park College, Oxford  

Programme:  

3:00 pm Mircea Dumitru|, Professor, Department of Theoretical Philosophy and Logic, University of Bucharest and Rector, University of Bucharest
The Relation of Metaphysics of Modality to Modal Actualism

Chair: Paul Fiddes|, Professor of Systematic Theology, University of Oxford  

4:00pm Brian Leftow|, Nolloth Professor of the Philosophy of the Christian Religion, University of Oxford
Response to Mircea Dumitru  

4:45pm Tea/Coffee  

5:00 pm Roxana Baiasu|, Member of Regent's Park College and Associate Member, Philosophy Faculty, University of Oxford/University of Vienna
Knowing How to Speak About What Cannot be Said: Objectivity and Epistemic Locatedness

5:40pm  Pamela Sue Anderson|,Reader in Philosophy of Religion, University of Oxford and Fellow in Philosophy, Regent’s Park College
Response to Roxana Baiasu  

 

A One-Day Symposium on Ricoeur and Arendt

Thursday 20 June 2013, 10am- 5.40pm
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford   

Programme:  

10-10.15am     Pamela Sue Anderson|, Reader in Philosophy of Religion, University
                           of Oxford and Fellow in Philosophy, Regent’s Park College
                           Opening Remarks

10.15-11am      Dana Mills|, DPhil candidate in Political Theory, Mansfield College
                            and Lecturer in Political Theory, Hertford College, University of Oxford
                            Reading Against the Grain: Reading History as Political Action 

Coffee Break

11.15am-12pm  Morny Joy|, University Professor in the Department of Religious
                             Studies, University of Calgary
                             Paul Ricoeur and Hannah Arendt on Natality and Narrative

12-12.45pm       Michael D'Angeli|, University of Oxford
                             “The Double Privilege of Athens and Jerusalem”: Ricoeur’s Late
                              Reflections on the Convergence between Philosophical Critique 
                              and Religious Conviction

Lunch    

2.15-3.45pm     Alana Vincent|, Lecturer in Jewish Studies, University of Chester and
                            Mark Godin|, Independent Scholar
                            Promises, Promises: Ricoeur Reading Arendt on the Perils and 
                            Possibilities of Human Plurality

Coffee Break 

4-4.45pm           Marije Altorf|, Head of Philosophy, St Mary's University College,
                             Twickenham
                             On Arendt and Imagination

4.45-5.30pm     Eléonore Dispersyn|, Institut Protestant de Théologie de Paris, 
                            Fonds Ricoeur 
                            From Kant’s Radical Evil to Ricoeur’s Hope: A Practical
                           Regeneration?

  5.40pm             Final Roundtable (30 mins)  

  

Dialogue on the Work of Jacques Rancière:

Moving the Boundaries of the Political

Friday 17 May 2013, 2-3.30pm
Seminar Room, Faculty of Philosophy, third floor, Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG, University of Oxford  

Michael Freeden|, Emeritus Professor of Politics, Mansfield College, University of Oxford
Dana Mills|, DPhil candidate in Political Theory, Mansfield College and Lecturer in Political Theory, Hertford College, University of Oxford  

Michael Freeden and Dana Mills critically examined the work of Jacques Rancière, one of the most important thinkers in contemporary philosophy. They discussed central concepts in his work as a way to open a vista into Rancière's thought and its reception in contemporary political theory.

  

Book Launch

Re-visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion: Reason, Love and Epistemic Locatedness

Saturday 9 March 2013, 2.30-4.00 pm
Lecture Room 1, Christ Church, University of Oxford 

Pamela Sue Anderson| (author), Reader in Philosophy of Religion, University of Oxford and Fellow in Philosophy, Regent’s Park College
Beverley Clack|, Professor in Philosophy of Religion, Department of History, Philosophy and Religion, Oxford Brookes University
Patrice Haynes|, Lecturer in Philosophy, Department of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies, Liverpool Hope University
Steven Shakespeare|, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, Department of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies, Liverpool Hope University  

Chair: Adrian W. Moore|, Professor of Philosophy, University of Oxford, Tutorial Fellow of St Hugh's College, Oxford  

This event marked the publication of Pamela Sue Anderson’s most recent book which has just appeared in the new series Intensities: Continental Philosophy of Religion edited by Steven Shakespeare and Patrice Haynes. In the context of post-Kantian European Philosophy the discussion focused on changes in the field of Philosophy of Religion raised by our epistemic locatedness. 

 

Panel Discussion

Biographical Knowledge

Friday 16 November 2012, 2.00-3.30 pm
Lecture Room, Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG, University of Oxford 

Nicholas Bunnin|, Director of the Philosophy Project, the Institute for Chinese Studies, University of Oxford
David Ellis|, Emeritus Professor, School of English, University of Kent
Michael Sheringham|, Marshal Foch Professor of French Literature and Fellow, All Souls College, University of Oxford

This panel will consider themes and puzzles regarding knowledge of one's own life and the lives of others. David Ellis is a biographer of D.H. Lawrence and the author of Literary Lives: Biography and the Search for Understanding. Michael Sheringham is the author of French Autobiography: Devices and Desires Rousseau to Perec. Nicholas Bunnin has written on Confucian 'Conceptions of the Self'. All three have been influenced by discussions of biography and auto-biography with the late Professor Frank Cioffi.  

Provocations

In this series we invite thinkers and scholars – thought provokers in their own right – to introduce a short text that has special significance to them

Husserl's Meditations and the Phenomenology of Religion

Friday 2 November 2012, 2.00-3.30 pm
Lecture Room, Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG, University of Oxford  

Gavin Flood|, Professor of Hindu Studies and Comparative Religion, University of Oxford

 

Provocations

Co-sponsored by the Oxford Forum and the Critical Theory and Spiritual Practice Seminar, University of Oxford

Kant on the Sublime: the Pleasures of Counter-Purposiveness

Thursday 31 May 2012, 5-6.30pm
Collier Room, Regent's Park College, University of Oxford

Katerina Deligiorgi|, Senior Lecturer in Literature and Philosophy, University of Sussex

Merleau-Ponty on Flesh and Painting 

Thursday 17 May 2012, 5-6.30pm
Collier Room, Regent's Park College, University of Oxford

Roxana Baiasu|, Member of Regent’s Park College, Associate Member of the Philosophy Faculty, University of Oxford 

Agacinski on Kierkegaard: Questioning Transcendence

Thursday 4 May 2012, 5-6.30pm
Collier Room, Regent's Park College, University of Oxford

Daphne Hampson|, Professor Emerita, University of St Andrews

 

Derrida – the Frame and the Colossus: Reflections on the Sublime in Kant

Thursday 26 April 2012, 5-6.30pm
Collier Room, Regent’s Park College, University of Oxford

Paul Fiddes|, Professor of Theology, University of Oxford 

 

Public Lecture

After the Beautiful: Hegel and the Philosophy of Pictorial Modernism

Co-sponsored by the Post-Kantian European Philosophy Seminar, the Ruskin School, University of Oxford, and the Oxford Forum

Friday 25 May 2012, 4-5.30 pm
McKenna Room, Christ Church College, University of Oxford

Robert Pippin|, Evelyn Stefansson Nef Distinguished Service Professor of Social Thought, Philosophy, and in the College at the University of Chicago

  

Book Launch

Kant and Sartre: Re-discovering Critical Ethics

Friday 11 May 2012, 2-3.30pm
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

Alan Montefiore|, Emeritus Fellow, Balliol College, University of Oxford and President of the Forum for European Philosophy

Adrian W. Moore|, Professor of Philosophy, the University of Oxford, Tutorial Fellow of St Hugh's College, Oxford

Sorin Baiasu|, Reader in Philosophy, University of Keele

Chair: Pamela Sue Anderson|, Reader in Philosophy of Religion, University of Oxford, Fellow in Philosophy, Regent's Park College, Oxford

Marking the publication of Sorin Baiasu’s new book Kant and Sartre: Re-discovering Critical Ethics, this panel discussion explored the structural similarities between the practical philosophies of these major thinkers, as well as the project of a critical ethics, which is emerging from their virtual dialogue.    

   

Panel Discussion

Re-appropriating Kant for Feminism

Friday 10 February 2012, 2–3.30pm
Examination Schools, 75-81 High Street, University of Oxford

Christine Battersby|, Reader Emerita in Philosophy, University of Warwick

Rachel Jones|, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Dundee

Stella Sandford|, Reader in Philosophy, University of Kingston, London

Chair: Pamela S. Anderson|, Reader in Philosophy, University of Oxford, Tutorial Fellow in Philosophy, Regent's Park College, Oxford

 

Provocations

In this series we invite thinkers and scholars – thought provokers in their own right – to introduce a short text that has special significance to them.

Ubi Inletabilitas Ibi Virtus. Melancholy, Virtue and Self-Consciousness

Friday 2 March 2012, 2.00-3.30pm
Examination Schools, 75-81 High Street, University of Oxford

Wayne Martin|, Professor of Philosophy, University of Essex

Read the text|

The Lion For Real: On § 327 of the typescript previously known as Part II of the Philosophical Investigations

Friday 4 November 2011, 2.30-4.00 pm
Lecture Room, Philosophy Faculty, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

Constantine Sandis|, Reader in Philosophy, Oxford Brookes University

'Wenn ein Löwe sprechen könnte, wir könnten ihn nicht verstehen'
'If a lion could talk, we could not understand him'

Ethics as Logic in Wittgenstein's Tractatus 

Monday 20 June 2011, 2-3.30 pm
Lecture Room, Philosophy Faculty, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

Chon Tejedor|, Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Oxford

Marking the publication of Chon Tejedor's|'s book Starting with Wittgenstein this talk will explore an intriguing aspect of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, namely the idea that his technical and apparently dry work on logic has an important and surprising ethical dimension.


Wittgenstein on Dogma  

Monday 13 June 2011, 2 – 3.30 pm
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

Katherine Morris|, Fellow in Philosophy, Mansfield College, University of Oxford  

For dogma is expressed in the form of an assertion, and is unshakable, but at the same time any practical opinion can be made to harmonize with it; admittedly more easily in some cases than in others.

It is not a wall setting limits to what can be believed, but more like a brake which, however, practically serves the same purpose; it's almost as though someone were to attach a weight to your foot to restrict your freedom of movement. This is how dogma becomes irrefutable and beyond the reach of attack. (CV 28 [1937])  

Dialogues 

Heidegger and the Phenomenology of Religion

Monday 14 November 2011, 4.00–5.30 pm
Blue Boar Lecture Theatre, Christ Church, Oxford

Mark Wrathall|, Professor of Philosophy, University of California, Riverside

In conversation with

George Pattison|, Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity, University of Oxford

 

Ethics and Psychoanalysis in Debate: Facing the Fragility of Life

Monday 23 May 2011, 2-3.30 pm
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

Pamela Sue Anderson|, Reader in Philosophy of Religion, University of Oxford and Fellow in Philosophy and Ethics, Regent's Park College

 In conversation with

Beverley Clack |, Professor in the Philosophy of Religion, Westminster Institute, Oxford Brookes University

Philosophers Pamela Sue Anderson |and Beverley Clack| will confront life's fragile nature from the standpoint of ethics and from the standpoint of psychoanalysis.

 

Provocations

Heidegger on Truth

Monday 2 May 2011, 2-3.30 pm
Lecture Room, Philosophy Faculty, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

Joseph K. Schear|, University Lecturer, University of Oxford, and Tutorial Fellow in Philosophy, Christ Church, Oxford

Animal Thoughts: On Some Recent Reality Effects in Philosophy and Film

Tuesday 15 February 2011, 5-6.30 pm
Lecture Room, Philosophy Faculty, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

John Mullarkey|, Professor of Film and Television Studies, School of Performance and Screen Studies, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Kingston University, London

Read the text  |        Read the text|

 

 

Provocations
Life after Deconstruction

Thursday 3 June 2010, 5-6.30 pm
Regent's Park College, Pusey Street, Oxford OX1 2LB

Ramona Fotiade|, Senior Lecturer, French Section, School of Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Glasgow

Chair: Nick Bunnin|, University of Oxford

Read the text|     Read the text|   Read the text|
Read the text|     Read the text|   Read the text|


Public Lecture
Kant's Geography of Reason

Wednesday 19 May 2010, 7.00 - 8.30 pm
 Lecture Room, Philosophy Faculty, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford.

Jeff Malpas|, Professor of Philosophy and Australian Professorial Fellow at the University of Tasmania, Hobart, and Distinguished Visiting Professor, LaTrobe University, Melbourne.

Chair: George Pattison|, Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity, University of Oxford

Immanuel Kant occupies a unique place as one of the few philosophers to engage seriously with geography. Not only does he occupy a founding role in the development of geography within the modern university, but he also deploys geography and geographical concepts as integral elements in his own philosophical project. In this respect, Kant can be construed as one of the pioneers, perhaps the very first, in the project of a 'philosophical topography' - a project that aims to explore the manner in which space, and also place, figure in human knowledge and experience as both the object of such knowledge and experience, and as part of its very structure.

Yet although it is commonplace to note the geographical orientation of Kant's work in the first Critique, as well as elsewhere in his writing, seldom is any sustained attention given to exactly how that geographical orientation actually plays out in Kant's inquiry, or even to what extent and in what ways it is indeed integrated into it (a notable exception is in Onora O'Neill's work, and the work of those influenced by her). Does recognition of the geographical in Kant's critical project offer any additional insight into the nature of that project? To what extent might a proper appreciation of the Kantian project, both its nature and its possible difficulties, actually depend upon an understanding of the geographical elements within it? In addressing such questions, this lecture will provide an introductory foray into the nature of Kant's geography of reason.

The exploration of the geographical in Kant, and with it, the investigation of Kant as philosophical topographer, can be seen to complement my topological reading of Heidegger's work, although it also represents a corrective to Heidegger's own neglect of the spatial and topographic elements in the Kantian project.


Provocations
Bergson and Freud with a bit of Shakespeare and Bacon

Thursday 13 May 2010, 5-6.30 pm
Regent's Park College, Collier Room, Pusey Street, Oxford OX1 2LB

Michèle Le Doeuff|, Director of Research, CNRS, Paris.

Launch-Seminar of a book dedicated to Michèle Le Doeuff

Thursday 13 May 2010, 8.00 pm (with wine)
Regent's Park College, University of Oxford, Pusey Street, Oxford OX1 2LB

This event is part of a series of interdisciplinary seminars on 'Critical Theory and Spiritual Practice'. New Topics in Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Contestations and Transcendence Incarnate (Springer, 2010) will be introduced by the book's editor, Pamela Sue Anderson|, who is a Reader in Philosophy of Religion at the University of Oxford and a Fellow in Philosophy at Regent's Park College .


Dialogues

The Legacy of John Rawls

Thursday 18 March 2010, 2.30 - 4.00 pm
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

Catherine Audard|, Visiting Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE and Chair of the Forum for European Philosophy; Département de philosophie, École Normale Supérieure, Paris. Author of John Rawls (Acumen Press, 2007).

In conversation with Adam Swift|, CUF Lecturer in Politics, Member of the Centre for the Study of Social Justice, Fellow in Politics and Sociology, Balliol College, University of Oxford.

Beyond recognizing the extraordinary influence of Rawls's work, it is not easy to assess his legacy because his is a dual legacy. Is he primarily a theorist of justice, or a theorist of stability and legitimacy? We discussed whether Rawls should be read as a liberal seeking to justify individual rights and egalitarian distributive principles, as a republican committed to public reason in the political sphere, or as both.


Dialogues

"Who Are You?" Debating Judith Butler

Thursday 4 March 2010, 6.45 - 8.15 pm
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

Pamela Sue Anderson|, Reader in Philosophy of Religion, University of Oxford and Fellow in Philosophy and Ethics, Regent's Park College, University of Oxford

In conversation with Victor Jeleniewski Seidler|, Professor of Social Theory, Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths College, University of London

In Giving An Account of Oneself, Judith Butler proposes a new ethical practice both responsive to the need for critical autonomy and grounded in the opacity of the human subject. Seidler and Anderson discussed whether 'the relationality that conditions and binds [the] self'- who fails, despite her best efforts, to make herself fully accountable 'to you' - is, as Bulter says, 'an indispensable resource for ethics'.


Provocations

Hegel, Freedom and Trust

Thursday 18 February 2010, 2.30 - 4.00 pm
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

Stephen Houlgate|, Professor of Philosophy, University of Warwick

Read the text |

Read the text |


Provocations

In this series we invite thinkers and scholars - thought provokers in their own right - to introduce a short text that has special significance to them. 

Wednesday 4 November 2009, 5.30-7.00 pm
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

The Tree of Knowledge

John Hyman|, Queen's College, University of Oxford; Professor of Aesthetics and Editor of The British Journal of Aesthetics

Read the Text|


Dialogue

An hour and a half of lively discussion at the Faculty of Philosophy at Oxford, this series offers a unique mix of insights into the ideas and development of great philosophers and our most distinguished thinkers.

Wednesday 14 October 2009, 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

 Philosophical Questions: Theological Answers

Michael Inwood|, Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy, Trinity College, University of Oxford

Stephen Priest|, Senior Research Fellow in Philosophy, Blackfriars Hall, University of Oxford and Member of Wolfson College, University of Oxford and Hughes Hall, University of Cambridge

In Philosophical Questions: Theological Answers Stephen Priest| argues that the fundamental questions of philosophy are not to be dismissed on a priori or scientific grounds and ultimately require theological answers. Why are you you? Could you do otherwise? What lasts from the cradle to the grave? Is there life after death? What is it like to be dead? What is it to be? Why is it now now? Why is there anything? have answers which entail the existence of God and the soul. Michael Inwood| contests Priest's conclusions as he draws them.


Provocations

In this series we invite thinkers and scholars - thought provokers in their own right - to introduce a short text that has special significance to them. 

Tuesday 19 May, 5-6.30pm
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford
Bernard Williams: The Limits of Philosophy
Miranda Fricker|, Reader in Philosophy, Birkbeck College, University of London

Read the Text|

Tuesday 16 June, 5-6.30pm
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford
How to Think About the Mind: Thomas Nagel and "The View from Nowhere"

Anita Avramides|, Reader and Southover Manor Trust Fellow in Philosophy, St. Hilda's College

Read the Text|


Dialogue

An hour and a half of lively discussion at the Faculty of Philosophy at Oxford, this series offers a unique mix of insights into the ideas and development of great philosophers and our most distinguished thinkers.

Tuesday, 28 April, 5-6.30
Lecture Room, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, University of Oxford

Kant, Metaphysical Illusions and the Limits of the Universe

Graham Bird, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy, University of Manchester

Adrian W. Moore|, Professor of Philosophy and Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Oxford, Tutorial Fellow of St Hugh's College, Oxford

Does the world have a beginning in time and a limit in space? Or is the world infinite? Is it ultimately made up of simple, indivisible parts or is it infinitely divisible? Professor Bird and Professor Moore will meet to discuss Kant's treatment of these issues and their relation to his philosophy as a whole.

Dialogue

Wednesday, 1 April, 5.00-6.30 pm
Lecture Room, Philosophy Faculty, 10 Merton Street, Oxford University

The Fleeing Gods

David Farrell Krell|, Professor of Philosophy, DePaul University, U.S., and the University of Freiburg, Germany.

William McNeill|, Professor of Philosophy, DePaul University, U.S.

Readings|

Dialogue

Wednesday, 4 February, 4.00-5.30 pm
Lecture Room, Philosophy Faculty Centre, 10 Merton Street, Oxford University

Wittgenstein and the Question of Being

Stephen Mulhall|, Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy, New College, Oxford.

Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE.

This dialogue marks the opening of the Oxford Forum, an offspring of the well- established Forum for European Philosophy. At first glance it might seem that conjoining Wittgenstein's name with a question primarily associated with Heidegger must involve a simple category mistake; but the matter is, in fact, more controversial than it appears. For whilst Herman Philipse, for example, has argued that one can only think of posing the question of Being if one is captivated by an 'Augustinian picture of language', Rush Rhees claimed that one misunderstands Wittgenstein altogether if one fails to see the pertinence of this question to his central concerns. Two leading scholars with exceptional expertise in both Wittgenstein and Heidegger will meet to debate the issue, with the aim of opening up a broad range of thought-provoking questions and possibilities for further discussion.

Dialogue

Wednesday, 1 April, 5.00-6.30 pm
Lecture Room, Philosophy Faculty, 10 Merton Street, Oxford University

The Fleeing Gods

David Farrell Krell|, Professor of Philosophy, DePaul University, U.S., and the University of Freiburg, Germany.

William McNeill|, Professor of Philosophy, DePaul University, U.S.

Readings|

The context of the dialogue is the currently strong contrast between, on the one hand, a sense of the expansion of secularism and, on the other, a sense of a revival of an engagement with religious concerns. A central question here is whether contemporary secularism does not hide on a deeper level a more subtle manifestation of religiosity, one that might even take the form of a religiosity without God. The dialogue will seek to develop this issue in the context of Nietzsche's proclamation of the death of God, the invocation of the flight of the gods in Hölderlin's poetizing, and the significance of these experiences for Heidegger's thought-a significance inevitably linked to the role of the gods in Greek tragedy.


Public Conference

20-21 March 2009,
Faculty of Philosophy and Regent's Park College, University of Oxford

 Ricoeur: On Memory, Politics and Forgiveness

Organisers: Dr Pamela Sue Anderson (Oxford) and Dr Roxana Baiasu (Oxford)

Speakers: Dr Pamela Sue Anderson| (Oxford), Professor Luc Bovens |(LSE), Professor Morny Joy| (Calgary), Professor David Klemm| (Iowa-Glasgow) and Professor William Schweiker| (Chicago)

Chair: Professor David Jasper| (Glasgow)

Since Ricoeur's death in 2005 there has been a constant stream of interest in his Memory, History, Forgetting (2004), as well as Reflections on The Just (2007); these richly challenging works on some of the most timely and deeply human concerns being debated by philosophers today are ripe for discussion not only by philosophers, but also by theologians, political theorists and all those thinking about life, loss, evil and the need for justice alongside of 'a difficult forgiveness'. This Ricoeur Symposium is related to an Oxford-Glasgow-Chicago interdisciplinary research network and the Critical Theory and Spiritual Practice Group at Regent's Park College.

Conference Programme

Friday 20 March, Faculty of Philosophy

14.00-15.15    Dialogue with Dr Pamela Sue Anderson (Regent's Park College, Oxford)
                          On Confidence, Power and Affirmation

15.15-15.30    Break

15.30-16.45    Dialogue with Professor Luc Bovens (LSE)
                          On Apologies and Forgiveness

16.45-17.15    Coffee/Tea

17.15-18.30    Dialogue with Professor Morny Joy (Calgary)
                          On Solicitude and Gift

Saturday 21 March, Regent's Park College

11.30-12.45    Dialogue with Professor David Klemm (Iowa-Glasgow)
                          On Reading Ricoeur (tbc)

13.00-14.15    Lunch (own arrangements)

14.15-15.30    Dialogue with Professor William Schweiker (Chicago)
                          On Ricoeur and Theological Humanism (tbc)

15.30-16.00    Coffee/Tea

16.00-17.00    Round table
                          Chair: Professor David Jasper (Glasgow)

The event is open to all and there are no registration fees For further information and to book a place contact Roxana Baiasu, Roxana.Baiasu@philosophy.ox.ac.uk| or Juliana Cardinale J.Cardinale@lse.ac.uk|

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