Panel Discussions Past Events

 

On Sexual Difference: Thinking with Catherine Malabou

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Monday 2 June 2014, 6.30 – 8pm
New Theatre, East Building, LSE  

 CatherineMalabou

Catherine Malabou|, Professor of Modern European Philosophy, Kingston University

 

Michael_o_Rourke

 

Michael O’Rourke|, Lecturer, School of Arts and Psychotherapy, Independent Colleges, Dublin

 

 

DanielleSands

Danielle Sands|, Visiting Lecturer, Department of English, Queen Mary University of London and Forum for European Philosophy Fellow

 

 

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Associate Professor of European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

What is sexual difference and why does it matter? What is gender? Is there an essence of ‘woman’? In what ways is our understanding of sexual orientation and gender identity informed and challenged by advances in biology? By feminism? By queer theory? Speaking both as a woman and a philosopher, Catherine Malabou guided us through these urgent and perplexing questions.

  

Wise Choices

This event is jointly organised with the LSE Choice Group|

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Tuesday 27 May 2014, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE   

MariaAlvarez 

Maria Alvarez|, Reader in Philosophy, King's College London  

 

 

LisaBortolotti 

 

Lisa Bortolotti|, Professor of Philosophy, University of Birmingham   

 

 

ChristianList 

Christian List|, Professor of Political Science and Philosophy, LSE  

 

 

 MagdaOsman 

 

Magda Osman|, Senior Lecturer in Experimental Cognitive Psychology, Queen Mary University of London

 

 

Chair: Katie Steele|, Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE

Traditional philosophical accounts of decision making assume that conscious rational thinking leads to wise choices. But recent psychological evidence suggests that we should trust our intuitions instead and ‘go with the flow’. Do these views conflict? If so, which one is correct? Or are both rational thinking and intuition ways of choosing for a reason? This panel discussion brought philosophers and psychologists together to discuss these and other questions raised by recent research on decision making.

 

European Questions - Turkish Angles: 

These events were jointly organized with the LSE Chair in Contemporary Turkish Studies

The aim of these events was to take up a theme that goes to the heart of Europe's current or historical self-understanding, and introduce into the discussions input from Turkish scholars or scholars of Turkey's history who might provide a fresh twist to an old story.

Europe's Unemployment

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Tuesday 28 February 2012, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

Luc Bovens|, Professor of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method LSE

Marco Simoni|, Lecturer in European Political Economy, European Institute, LSE

İnsan Tunali|, Associate Professor of Economics, Koç University, Turkey

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy 
 

Europe's Nation States

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Monday 14 November 2011, 6.30 – 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

John Breuilly|, Professor of Nationalism and Ethnicity, Government Department, LSE

Sir Francis Jacobs|, Professor of Law and Jean Monnet Professor, King's College London

Umut Özkirimli|, Visiting Professor, Centre for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy 

Europe's Banking System

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Monday 24 October 2011, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

Philip Goodchild|, Professor of Religion and Philosophy, Department of Theology and Religious Studies, University of Nottingham

Şevket Pamuk|, Professor of Contemporary Turkish Studies, European Institute, LSE

Waltraud Schelkle|, Senior Lecturer in Political Economy, European Institute, LSE and Adjunct Professor, Economics Department, Free University of Berlin

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy  

Europe's Secularity

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Monday 24 January 2011, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

John Madeley, Government Department, London School of Economics and Political Science

Philippe Marliere|, Professor in French and European Politics, University College London

Hakan Yilmaz|, Professor of Political Science, Boğaziçi University, İstanbul;

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

 


 

 

Valuing the Humanities

 

Friday 17 December 2010, 2.30-5pm
Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House, LSE

James Ladyman|, Professor of Philosophy, University of Bristol; co-editor, British Journal for the Philosophy of Science

Martha Nussbaum|, Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics, University of Chicago

Lord Rees of Ludlow|, President of the Royal Society, Astronomer Royal, Master of Trinity College Cambridge

Richard Smith|, Former editor, British Medical Journal; Director, Ovations Institute

Chair: Mark Lawson|, BBC Radio 4, The Guardian

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European Questions - Turkish Angles:
Europe's Citizens

Monday 1 November 2010, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

Richard Bellamy|, Professor of Political Science and Director of the School of Public Policy, UCL
Thomas Diez|, Professor of Political Science and International Relations, University of Tübingen
Maurice Fraser|, Senior Fellow in European Politics, European Institute, LSE

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

Organized jointly with the LSE Chair in Contemporary Turkish Studies, this series of events explores how our understanding of Europe's identity can be enhanced and developed in a new way by taking in a distinctively Turkish perspective

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European Questions - Turkish Angles:
Europe's History

 Monday 25 October 2010, 6.30 - 8.00pm
 Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

Peter Osborne|, Professor of Modern European Philosophy, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Kingston University, London
Şevket Pamuk|, Professor of Contemporary Turkish Studies, European Institute, LSE
 Donald Sassoon|, Professor of Comparative European History, Queen Mary, University of London

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

Organized jointly with the LSE Chair in Contemporary Turkish Studies, this series of events explores how our understanding of Europe's identity can be enhanced and developed in a new way by taking in a distinctively Turkish perspective    

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Crisis in the Body and in the Body Politic

This event is jointly organised with Big Ideas

Wednesday 5 May 2010, 7.30 - 9pm
The Counting House, 50 Cornhill, London, EC3V 3PD

Amber Jacobs|, Psychosocial theorist

Mareike Kleine|, Political Scientist

Andy Wilson|, Director of L-Shift

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

While having its roots in political contexts of decision or decisive judgement in Greek antiquity, up until the seventeenth century the term "crisis" was primarily used in a medical diagnosis, referring to a traumatic condition of the human body. Subsequently its use widened to include once more phenomena in politics, but also in economics, psychology and religion. Crisis today has meaning in almost every aspect of life. Is this a co-incidence or are these phenomena related in some fundamental way? It is hard to imagine a social crisis without psychological expression. But it is equally hard to imagine a psychological crisis without social roots. Is every social crisis a psycho-social one? And is every psychological crisis a psycho-social crisis too? To put it in a way which draws on its long use in medicine, is every crisis of the body a crisis of the body politic? In this event we explored the realities and relations of the crises in our lives.


Dance, Text, and Translation: Creating a Dialogue

This event is jointly supported by the LSE Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method and the Forum for European Philosophy

LSE Space for Thought Literary Festival: Off the Edge|

Friday 12 February 2010, 12.30-2pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Jasmin Vardimon|, Artistic Director of the Jasmin Vardimon Dance Company

Helen Thomas|, Professor and Research Director at the London College of Fashion

Chair: Luc Bovens|, Professor of Philosophy, LSE

Organisers: Luc Bovens| (Professor of Philosophy, LSE), Dana Mills| (University of Oxford) and Dr. Jennifer Tarr (Methodology)

Dance is generally concerned with non-verbal bodily communication, while literature is text-based and disembodied. However, the long relationship between dance and text has been explored both through textual interfaces by collapsing the boundaries between different art forms such as physical theatre, dance and literature and within the world of text, these boundaries are negotiated through the body of literature written about dance.

The exploration of the interactions between dance and literature opens up possibilities for exploring social and political, philosophical, and methodological problems concerning time and space as the constitutive elements of dance, the possibility to 'write' dance, and the social, cultural and political issues which dance expresses. This session aimed to create a dialogue between dance practitioners and dance authors; between those who practice dance and think of texts on the one hand and those who write texts and think of dance on the other hand.

Jasmin Vardimon is Artistic Director of the Jasmin Vardimon Dance Company|, which uses theatre, text and technologies to produce innovative and award-winning choreographies.

Helen Thomas is Professor and Research Director at the London College of Fashion. Her work focuses on the sociology of dance and culture. She is the author of several books including Dance, Modernity and Culture| (1995) and The Body, Dance and Cultural| Theory| (2004) and has directed research projects on dance and social inclusion, pain and injury in dancers, and social dance amongst older people.


Literature and the Academic
Literature as a resource for other disciplines

LSE Space for Thought Literary Festival: Off the Edge|

Friday 12 February 2010, 6.00 - 7.30pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Literature and Economics
Richard Bronk|, Visiting Fellow, European Institute, LSE. Author of The Romantic Economist - Imagination in Economics (CUP 2009)

Literature and History
Margot Finn|, Professor of History, University of Warwick. Author of The Character of Credit: Personal Debt in English Culture (CUP 2003)

Literature and Medicine
Neil Vickers|, Senior Lecturer in Literature and Medicine, Kings College, London. Author of Coleridge and the Doctors (OUP 2004)

Chair: Simon Blackburn|, Professor of Philosophy, University of Cambridge. His publications include Think (OUP, 1999), Being Good (OUP, 2001), and Lust (OUP, 2004)

The session examined how the reading of literature can expand the analytical imagination, provide alternative metaphors and supply vital empirical evidence. Three academics from very different disciplines discussed ways in which literature can be invaluable to the broader research community.


Managing Risk and Behaviour in Financial Markets

This event is organised with the LSE Law and Financial Markets Project, the LSE Centre for the Analysis of Risk and Regulation, the LSE Financial Markets Group, and the Paul Woolley Centre for the Study of Capital Market Dysfunctionality, FMG, LSE  

Wednesday 25 November 2009 6.30-8.00pm
 Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE

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Julia Black|, Professor of Law, LSE, and Research Associate at the ESRC Centre for the Analysis of Risk and Regulation, LSE

Charles Goodhart|, LSE Professor Emeritus of Banking and Finance and a member of the Financial Markets Group at the LSE having previously been its Deputy Director (1987-2005).

Michael Power|, Professor of Accounting, LSE, and Research Theme Director of the ESRC Centre for the Analysis of Risk and Regulation, LSE

Paul Woolley|, Senior Fellow and Chairman of the Advisory Board at the Paul Woolley Centre for the Study of Capital Market Dysfunctionality, FMG, LSE

Chair: Roger McCormick|, Visiting Professor, Law Department, LSE and Project Director of the LSE Law and Financial Markets Project

The consequences of banks' risk taking behaviour will be felt by the public finances of many countries for at least another generation. Policy makers are trying to devise strategies for containing risk taking by the markets, but the financial sector is showing every sign of rebounding and its capacity for innovation seems inexhaustible. So despite the catastrophic consequences of the market in collateralised debt obligations, for example, there are now reports of banks developing new, 'smart' strategies of securitisation which will again enable them to reduce the amount of capital they have to retain to set against their risks. Coming from different disciplines, this Panel discussed how risk taking behaviour, the lifeblood of financial markets, can and should be managed.

julia-blackJulia Black| joined the Law Department in 1994. She completed her first degree in Jurisprudence and her DPhil at Oxford University. Her primary research interest is regulation. In 2001-2 she received a British Academy / Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship to develop her work in this area, and in 2007-8 was a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. She has written extensively in the area of regulation, and also advised policy makers, consumer bodies and regulators on issues of institutional design and regulatory policy. She is also a research associate of the ESRC Centre for the Analysis of Risk and Regulation| (CARR), based at LSE

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CharlesGoodhartCharles Goodhart|, CBE, FBA is a member of the Financial Markets Group| at the London School of Economics, having previously, 1987-2005, been its Deputy Director. Until his retirement in 2002, he had been the Norman Sosnow Professor of Banking and Finance at LSE since 1985. Before then, he had worked at the Bank of England for seventeen years as a monetary adviser, becoming a Chief Adviser in 1980. In 1997 he was appointed one of the outside independent members of the Bank of England's new Monetary Policy Committee until May 2000. Earlier he had taught at Cambridge and LSE. Besides numerous articles, he has written a couple of books on monetary history; a graduate monetary textbook, Money, Information and Uncertainty (2nd Ed. 1989); two collections of papers on monetary policy, Monetary Theory and Practice (1984) and The Central Bank and The Financial System (1995); and a number of books and articles on Financial Stability, on which subject he was Adviser to the Governor of the Bank of England, 2002-2004, and numerous other studies relating to financial markets and to monetary policy and history. In his spare time he is a sheep farmer (loss-making)

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MichaelPowerMichael Power| is Professor of Accounting and Research Theme Director of the ESRC Centre for the Analysis of Risk and Regulation| (CARR) at the London School of Economics, where he has worked since 1987. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) and an Associate member of the UK Chartered Institute of Taxation. He is a member of the risk management committee of the London School of Economics and, since May 2005, is a non-executive Director of St James's Place plc where he is chair of the Risk Committee and Deputy Chair of the Audit Committee. His research and teaching focuses on regulation, accounting, auditing, internal control and risk management. Among his publications are The Audit Society: Rituals of Verification (Oxford University Press, 1999), which has been translated into Italian, Japanese and French, and Organized Uncertainty: Designing a World of Risk Management (Oxford University Press, 2007.

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PaulWoolleyPaul Woolley's| career has spanned the private sector, academia and policy-oriented institutions. He gained his BA and D Phil in Economics from the University of York (UK) and was a lecturer there in the early 1970's. He then had a long spell at the International Monetary Fund in Washington, latterly heading the division managing the Fund's investment and borrowing. He returned to the UK as a director of merchant bank, Baring Brothers. For the next twenty years he founded and ran the European arm of GMO, the global fund management business based in Boston, US. He returned to academic life in 2007, funding  The Paul Woolley Centres for the Study of Capital Market Dysfunctionality| at the London School of Economics, where he is a full-time member of the research team, also at UTS Sydney and the University of Toulouse. He is a Senior Fellow at the LSE and Hon. Professor of York University.

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The Individual and Society: does the West have the balance right?

Wednesday 22 October 2008, 6.30-8pm
Hong Kong Theatre, LSE

Panel: David Willetts|, MP; John Cottingham|, Professor of Philosophy, University of Reading

Chair: Daniel Johnson, Editor, Standpoint magazine|

To many people, the contemporary emphasis on the individual in politics is responsible for loosening the web of duties and relationships that is crucial to civil life and flourishing communities. Of course, the emphasis is typically intended as an ontological as much as a moral one. The reference to the individual aims to give politics a secure foundation in reality, and, so the argument goes, the real foundations of human forms of life are individuals and their families, not societies. 

In the forms of life characteristic of the West today have we got the balance between the individual and society right? Why do we find it so hard to agree the boundaries of personal freedom and collective responsibility? And is the West indeed guilty of privileging the individual at the expense of society?

In this panel discussion the Forum for European Philosophy collaborated with the new culture and politics magazine Standpoint to explore a fundamental question about the Western image of the individual and its implications for our lives with others.

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