Forum Annual Lecture Series Past Events

Sovereignty and Identity:

This event was part of the Jean Monnet 'Europe Beyond Governance' Lecture Series

6 - 12 June 2012

Freud on Translation

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|Wednesday 6 June 2012, 6.30 – 8.00pm

Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

RobertJCYoung|


Robert J. C. Young|
, Julius Silver Professor of English and Comparative Literature, New York University






Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

The translations of Freud have been a subject of controversy for many years, but how did Freud himself theorise the role of translation in psychoanalysis? Freud's own extensive use of the concept of translation can help us to rethink not only the practices of psychoanalysis and of cultural translation but also the possibility of translating “Freud”.

 

Republicanism, Representation and Demoi-cracy in the EU

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|Tuesday 12 June 2012, 6.30 – 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

RichardBellamy(1)|


Richard Bellamy|
, Professor of Political Science and Director of the European Institute, University College London






Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

This lecture contrasted liberal and republican models of democracy and representation and applied them to the EU. The inadequacies of EU level democracy are traced to it only being able to sustain a political ontology of singularism suitable for liberal democracy as opposed to the more demanding ontology of civicity required by republican democracy. This limitation results from the EU lacking a demos and consisting instead of multiple national demoi. However, the liberal system of democratic representation cannot legitimize the non-Pareto improvement decisions that are increasingly made at the EU level. The only basis for a European ontology of civicity lies in valorising republican democratic decision-making and representation within the different demoi of the Member States in the EU’s system of governance.

 

Philosophy and European Union

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|
Tuesday 19 June 2012, 6.30 – 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE


SimonGlendinning|


Simon Glendinning|
, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy





Chair: Kristina Musholt|, LSE Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method and Deputy Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

In 1785 Kant predicted that ‘in our continent, where all are so closely linked by trade’ war and threats of war would eventually lead to the formation of ‘a great political body of the future, without precedence in the past’. Nietzsche, some hundred years later, saw something similar coming too. In this lecture Simon Glendinning explored how the views of philosophers prefigured and prepared for the reality of European Union today. 

 

 

Memory between Literature and History:

This event was part of the Jean Monnet 'Europe Beyond Governance' Lecture Series

5 May - 19 May 2011

Memory and literature are constitutive for an understanding of Europe, its past and present: without them, there can be no grasp of what 'Europe' means.In this series, an historian, a novelist and a literary critic will explore the ways in which memory, literature and history interact to shape contemporary Europe. 

Literature and History in European post-Cold War Memory

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Thursday 5 May 2011, 6.30 – 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Dan Stone

 

Dan Stone|, Professor of Modern History, Royal Holloway,
University of London

  

 

Berlin, Seventh of November – History in Non-historical Fiction: A Discussion and Reading

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Tuesday 17 May 2011, 6.30 – 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Douglas Cowie

 

Douglas Cowie|, Novelist and Lecturer, English Department,
Royal Holloway, University of London

 

 

Between: Literature and Memory, Past and Future

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Thursday 19 May 2011, 6.30 – 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Robert Eagleton

 

Robert Eaglestone|, Professor of Contemporary Literature and
Thought, Department of English, Royal Holloway,
University of London and Series Editor, Routledge Critical Thinkers

  

Art and the Limits of the Political:

This event was part of the Jean Monnet 'Europe Beyond Governance' Lecture Series 

24 May - 14 June 2010

A series of three lectures examining the proposition that contemporary art can go beyond transforming our understanding of the political and build new forms of political and social relations.

Monday 24 May 2010, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE
Alexander Düttmann|, Professor of Philosophy and Visual Culture, Goldsmiths, University of London
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Monday 7 June 2010, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE
Herman Rapaport|, Reynolds Professor of English, Wake forest University
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Monday 14 June 2010, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE
Jonathan Lahey Dronsfield|, Reader in Theory and Philosophy of Art, University of Reading
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Turkey: East or West?

26 May - 16 June 2009

This event was jointly organised by The Transatlantic & Caucasus Studies Institute, London and The Forum for European Philosophy    

 

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William Arthurs 2009 ©

The Republic of Turkey, as a secular nation state, was created out of the ashes of the Ottoman Empire at the end of World War I. Since then Turkey has moved steadily westward, being hailed as a model for the Islamic world. Now an established member of NATO, the Council of Europe and the OSCE, though membership of the European Union has proved elusive. But as a nation that straddles two continents (Asia and Europe) it has always had a complex identity. This lecture series looked at the forces that are shaping Turkey from within and the impact and influence Turkey is projecting in the region and beyond; ultimately asking the question: where next for Turkey?

The Creation of the Secular State of Turkey

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Tuesday 26 May 2009, 6.30-8.00pm
Alumni Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Andrew Mango, Author and biographer of Mustafa Kamal Atatürk
 

Turkey Looking West: Culture, Identity and European Integration

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Tuesday 2 June 2009, 6.30-8.00pm
Alumni Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Hakan Yilmaz|, Professor at the Department of Political Science and International Relations, Boğaziçi University, Istanbul

 

The Rise of Religion in the Public Sphere

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Tuesday 9 June 2009, 6.30-8.00pm
Alumni Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Ilhan Uzgel, Associate Professor at the Faculty of Political Science, Ankara University, Turkey

Turkey's Changing Role in Geopolitics

Tuesday16 June 2009, 6.30-8.00pm
Room G108, 20 Kingsway, LSE

Ziba Norman|, Director, Transatlantic & Caucasus Studies Institute, London

 

TransatlanticInstitute|    Forum for European Philosophy website
reg. charity No 1108682                            reg. charity No 1070105


Secularity and Value  27 May - 17 June 2008

The recent revival of religion around the globe has raised fundamental questions not only about its role in both national and international politics, but also concerning its claim to serve as a principle of identity indispensable to the continuing survival of communities and peoples across the generations. There are many who would argue strenuously that the sense of belonging to a community is seriously weakened in the absence of a shared religious commitment. Others would insist just as strenuously that social and public life should be both conceived and organised in essentially secular terms. Our lecture series, held at the LSE in the summer term 2008, brought together leading thinkers and scholars to encourage discussion and debate on this crucial contemporary theme.

christina LafontTuesday 17 June 2008, 6.30-8.00pm
Room E171, New Theatre, East Building, LSE

Religion and Secularism in the Public Sphere
Cristina Lafont, Professor of Philosophy, Northwestern University

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Tuesday 10 June 2008, 6.30-8.00pm

Cecile LabordeRoom E171, New Theatre, East Building, LSE

A Critical Defense of Secularism

Cécile Laborde, Reader in Political Theory, Department of Political Science, School of Public Policy, University College London.

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Tuesday 3 June 2008, 6.30-8.00pm

richard NormanRoom E171, New Theatre, East Building, LSE

Secularism and Shared Values

Richard Norman, Emeritus Professor of Moral Philosophy, Department of Philosophy, School of European Culture and Languages, University of Kent.

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Tuesday 27 May 2008, 6.30-8.00pm

Mona SidiqquiRoom E171, New Theatre, East Building, LSE

Does Faith Matter for Human Morality?

Mona Siddiqui, Professor of Islamic Studies and Public Understanding and Director of Centre for the Study of Islam, Department of Theology and Religious Studies, University of Glasgow.

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Secularism
20 May - 11 June 2007

The recent revival of religion around the globe has raised fundamental questions not only about its role in both national and international politics, but also concerning its claim to serve as a principle of identity indispensable to the continuing survival of communities and peoples across the generations. There are many who would argue strenuously that the sense of belonging to a community is seriously weakened in the absence of a shared religious commitment. Others would insist just as strenuously that social and public life should be both conceived and organised in essentially secular terms. Our lecture series, held at the LSE in the summer term 2007, brought together leading thinkers and scholars to encourage discussion and debate on this crucial contemporary theme.

Steve BruceMonday 11 June 2007, 6.30-8pm
Room G108, 20 Kingsway, LSE

Secularization and Indifference

Steve Bruce, Professor of Sociology at the University of Aberdeen.

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Wednesday 6 June 2007, 6.30-8pm

Bhikhu ParekhSecularism and Multiculturalism
Room G108, 20 Kingsway, LSE

Bhikhu Parekh, Centennial Professor in the Centre for the Study of Global Governance at the LSE, Emeritus Professor of Political Theory at the University of Hull and Fellow of the British Academy.

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Monday 4 June 2007, 6.30-8pm

Simon BlackburnRoom G108, 20 Kingsway, LSE

Secularism and Reason

Simon Blackburn, Professor of Philosophy at Trinity College, University of Cambridge and Fellow of the British Academy.

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Wednesday 30 May 2007, 6.30-8pm

Roger ScrutonRoom G108, 20 Kingsway, LSE

Morality and Public Space

Roger Scruton, Philosopher, Journalist and Broadcaster. He is currently Research Professor at the Institute for the Psychological Sciences in Arlington, Virginia and Visiting Professor at Princeton University.

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