Book Launches past events

Derrida and (the) English

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Thursday 3 November 2011, 6.30 – 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

 Photo of Rachel Bowlby

  

Rachel Bowlby|, Northcliffe Professor of English,
University College London

 

 


Photo of Robert Eagleston

 

Robert Eaglestone|, Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London and Series Editor, Routledge Critical Thinkers

 

Photo of Sarah Wood

 

 

 

Sarah Wood|, Senior Lecturer, School of English,
University of Kent   

 

 

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

Marking the publication of Simon Glendinning's new book Derrida: A Very Short Introduction, this discussion will explore Derrida's impact on English, both as a university discipline and as a national language. The speakers will discuss how Derrida encourages academics in English departments to feel a bit less tightly disciplined by the discipline they teach, and how he encourages English-speakers in general to feel a bit less tightly 'in' the language they call their own.

 

Bridging Facts and Values?

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Wednesday 18 May 2011, 6.30 – 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Alan Montefiore|, Emeritus Fellow, Balliol College, University of Oxford and President of the Forum for European Philosophy
Stephen Mulhall|, Professor and Fellow in Philosophy, New College, University of Oxford
Sarah Richmond|, Senior Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, University College London 

Chair: Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

Marking the publication of Alan Montefiore|'s new book A Philosophical Retrospective: Facts, Values and Jewish Identity, this panel discussion will explore the idea that in some cultural and conceptual contexts (but not in others) concepts of identity may be understood as constituting a natural bridge between fact and value. 

 

Unfathomable Event

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Tuesday 10 May 2011, 6.30 – 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Simon Glendinning|, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy
Amber Jacobs|, Lecturer, Department of Psychosocial Studies, Birkbeck, University of London
Nicholas Royle|, Professor of English, University of Sussex

Marking the publication of Nicholas Royle|'s new novel Quilt, a novel constantly engaged with the unfathomable, this event will attempt to explore the dimensions and ascertain the depths of the unfathomable in everyday life, in social relations, in politics, philosophy, religion, cinema, literature, and dreams.

 

Spinoza Today

Thursday 10 June 2010, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, Lincoln's Inn Fields, LSE

Michael Mack|, Reader in Medical Humanities and English Literature,
Durham University
Susan James|, Professor of Philosophy, Birkbeck College, University of London
Beth Lord|, Philosophy Department, University of Dundee

Spinoza's importance today turns on the distinctive way in which he argues that the flourishing of the individual relies on the flourishing of human society as a whole. In this discussion, and marking the publication of Michael Mack's book 'Spinoza and the Spectres of Modernity' (Continuum, 2010), leading scholars will examine and assess the recent renaissance of interest in Spinoza.

 

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