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Forum For European Philosophy

European Institute 2014/15 Events coming soon.

Summer Term 2014

Thursday 1 May, 6.30-8pm
Hong Kong Theatre, CLM, LSE
On the Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in Science
Speakers: Steven French, Eleanor Knox and Mairi Sakellariadou
Chair: Bryan Roberts

Tuesday 13 May, 6.30-8pm
Wolfson Theatre, NAB, LSE
Ethics Matters in Financial Theory
Speakers: Christian Walter and Jean-Pierre Zigrand
Chair: Alex Voorhoeve

Tuesday 20 May, 6.30-8pm
Wolfson Theatre, NAB, LSE
Safeguards of a Disunified Mind
Speaker: Wlodek Rabinowicz
Chair: Juliana Cardinale

Thursday 22 May, 6.30-8pm
Sheikh Zayed Theatre, NAB, LSE
Poverty, Justice and Development
Speakers: David Hulme and Thomas Pogge
Chair: Gabriel Wollner

Tuesday 27 May, 6.30-8pm
Wolfson Theatre, NAB, LSE
Wise Choices
Speakers: Maria Alvarez, Lisa Bortolotti, Christian List and Magda Osman
Chair: Katie Steele

Monday 2 June, 6.30-8pm
New Theatre, EAS, LSE
On Sexual Difference: Thinking with Catherine Malabou
Speakers: Catherine Malabou, Michael O’Rourke and Danielle Sands
Chair: Simon Glendinning

Tuesday 3 June, 6.30-8pm
Wolfson Theatre, NAB, LSE
On Making a Difference and Choosing a Career
Speaker: William MacAskill
Chair: Gabriel Wollner

Thursday 12 June, 6.30-8pm
Sheikh Zayed Theatre, NAB, LSE
The Evolution of Culture in Monkeys, Apes and Humans
Speakers: Jonathan Birch and Andrew Whitten
Chair: Bryan Roberts

Thursday 26 June, 6.30-8pm
Sheikh Zayed Theatre, NAB, LSE
Philosophy Challenge Hosted by Charlie Saffrey

Tuesday 1 July, 6.30-8pm
Wolfson Theatre, NAB, LSE
Deleuze’s Migrants and Nomads: The European Union in 2014
Speaker: Eva Aldea
Chair: Danielle Sands

Lent Term 2014

Thursday 6 March, 6.30-8pm
Wolfson Theatre, NAB, LSE
Hypotheses on Europe and the Twentieth Century
Speaker: Denis Guénoun
Chair: Simon Glendinning

Saturday 1 March, 11am-12.30pm
Wolfson Theatre, NAB, LSE
LSE Literary Festival: Understanding the World: Religious and Secular Perspectives
Speakers: Arthur Bradley and Kenan Malik
Chair: Danielle Sands

Friday 28 February, 6.30-8pm
Wolfson Theatre, NAB, LSE
LSE Literary Festival: Understanding the Self
Speakers: Mary Midgley, Jonathan Rée and Raymond Tallis
Chair: Danielle Sands

Thursday 20 February, 6.30-8pm
Hong Kong Theatre, CLM, LSE
On Exploitation
Speakers: Hillel Steiner and Nicholas Vrousalis
Chair: Gabriel Wollner

Thursday 13 February, 6.30-8pm
Hong Kong Theatre, CLM, LSE
Ethics Matters in War
Speakers: Cecile Fabre and Jeff McMahan
Chair: Gabriel Wollner

Tuesday 11 February, 6.30-8pm
Wolfson Theatre, NAB, LSE
Plato between the Teeth of the Beast: Animals and Democracy in Tomorrow’s Europe
Speaker: Richard Iveson
Chair: Danielle Sands

Tuesday 4 February, 6.30-8pm
Wolfson Theatre, NAB, LSE
Justice in Finance
Speaker: Gabriel Wollner
Chair: Bryan Roberts

Wednesday 29 January, 6.30-8pm
New Theatre, EAS, LSE
Inventing the Individual: The Origins of Western Liberalism
Speaker: Larry Siedentop
Chair: Simon Glendinning

Monday 27 January, 6.30-8pm
Old Theatre, OLD, LSE
The Ethics of 'Nudge'
Speakers: George Loewenstein, Samuel Nguyen and Drazen Prelec
Chair: Luc Bovens

Monday 20 January, 6.30-8pm
Sheikh Zayed Theatre, NAB, LSE
Consilience: The Ethics of the Cognitive Sciences – What can the brain tell us about the mind?
Speakers: Ray Dolan, Peter Hacker and Nikolas Rose
Chair: Tali Sharot

Wednesday 15 January, 6.30-8pm
Old Theatre, OLD, LSE
Consilience: Measuring Happiness?
Speakers: Paul Dolan, Elaine Fox, Andrew Oswald and Ben Page
Chair: Tali Sharot

Michaelmas Term 2013

Tuesday 8 October, 6.30 – 8pm
The Nature of Existence
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE
Tim Crane, Knightbridge Professor of Philosophy, University of Cambridge
Chair: Danielle Sands, Visiting Lecturer, Department of English, Queen Mary, University of London and Forum for European Philosophy Fellow

"The nature of existence" is a phrase that will mean different things to different people. To some it will bring to mind the question of the nature of our own existence. This lecture will not be about that important question, but about another one: the nature of existence as such. What is it for anything at all to exist? Tim Crane will address this question by contrasting existence with non-existence, and contrasting the kinds of properties existing and non-existing things have. He rejects the claim, deriving from Descartes and Malebranche, that nothingness can have no properties, and instead he will argue that non-existing things can only have properties of one distinctive kind. This marks a difference with existing things, and tells us something about the nature of existence.

Tuesday 15 October, 6.30 – 8pm
Virtue Ethics
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE
Brad Hooker, Professor of Philosophy, University of Reading
Constantine Sandis, Professor of Philosophy, Oxford Brookes University
Chair: Gabriel Wollner, Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE and Forum for European Philosophy Fellow

Virtues are of course instrumentally valuable. Are they also non-instrumentally valuable, i.e., valuable as ends and not just as means? A further question is whether virtues play an ineliminable role in determining what is morally required. Does the fact that a virtuous person would characteristically both have a certain set of reactions and do actions of certain kinds make those reactions and actions morally required?

Tuesday 5 November, 6.30 – 8pm
Climate Justice vis-à-vis Global Justice
Tuesday 5 November, 6.30 – 8pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE
Katie Steele, Senior Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE
Chair: Gabriel Wollner, Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE and Forum for European Philosophy Fellow

The key question of climate justice is: Who should accept responsibility for, and bear the costs of, climate change? A further question is whether climate change can be sectioned off as an isolated issue of justice, or whether it is inextricably entangled with broader concerns of global justice. This lecture will discuss two different ways of understanding the isolationist approach to climate justice—one focussed on isolating the consequences of responding to climate change and the other focussed on isolating the resource implicated in climate change (commonly referred to as the ‘global carbon sink’). Does either of these isolationist approaches have theoretical and/or pragmatic merit?

Wednesday 13 November, 6.30 – 8pm
Privacy and Respect for Persons
Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House, LSE
Roger Brownsword, Professor of Law, King’s College London
Sarah Edwards, Senior Lecturer in Research Ethics and Governance, Centre for Philosophy, Justice and Health, University College London
Sarah Richmond, Senior Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, University College London
Chair: Bahador Bahrami, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London

The continuing development of brain imaging technologies is now bringing into reach the correlation of brain activity with psychological states and traits, such as personality traits, mental health vulnerabilities, (unconscious) preferences and desires, or truthfulness. At the same time, different groups, such as employers, advertisers, health insurers and the government, all have strong interests in the knowledge offered by the neurosciences. How concerned should we be about these developments, and how can we ensure the protection of our privacy and dignity?

Tuesday 19 November, 6.30 – 8pm
Children’s Pathologies
Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House, LSE
Rachel Cooper, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion, Lancaster University
Eileen Munro, Professor of Social Policy, LSE Emily Simonoff, Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, King’s College London
Chair: TBC

The classification, identification and treatment of mental illnesses in children raises particular challenges. For example, what are the appropriate criteria for diagnosing children with a mental disorder? How can we avoid the risk of stigmatisation that some children and their families experience? What are the risks of not identifying mental illness in children and how does it impact on their wellbeing, self-esteem, academic attainment and social development? Is it true that there is an increased tendency towards medicalizing certain behaviours that might once have been seen as normal (if challenging)? To what extent is it possible to predict which children will experience deficits in physical, psychological and social development due to problematic parenting, and what are the implications for public policy decision making?

Tuesday 26 November, 6.30 – 8pm 
Metaphor and Crisis in Freud and Derrida
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE
Nina Morgan, Associate Professor of English and Interdisciplinary Studies, Kennesaw State University
Chair: Simon Glendinning, Reader in European Philosophy, European Institute, LSE and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy

In times of crisis, our understanding often makes recourse to metaphorical expressions of our condition. How (if at all) does this metaphoricity work for us? Whether in dreams, poetry, or philosophy, metaphor and symbols play a powerful role in shaping our experience. A comparison of Jacques Derrida (Athens, Still Remains) and Sigmund Freud (A Disturbance of Memory on the Acropolis), as travellers facing the ruins of Athens, will offer insight into the trans-forming work of metaphors.

Tuesday 3 December, 6.30 – 8pm
The Open Society as an Enemy
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE
Jason McKenzie Alexander, Professor of Philosophy, LSE
Chair: Tali Sharot, Faculty Member and Director of the Affective Brain Lab, Department of Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences, UCL

In 1945, Karl Popper published his defence of liberal democracy in The Open Society and Its Enemies. Now, more than seventy years later, we find ourselves living in a time when an unprecedented amount of information about our lives is made public, as well as held by private and governmental organisations. Jason McKenzie Alexander will argue that such openness and transparency, instead of supporting the foundations of liberal democracy, in fact undermines it.

Monday 9 December, 6.30 – 8pm
Zhang Shizhao: A Forgotten Theorist of Social Change
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE
Leigh Jenco, Lecturer in Political Theory, Department of Government, LSE
Chair: Nick Bunnin, Institute for Chinese Studies, University of Oxford

2013 marks the 40th anniversary of the death of Zhang Shizhao, an influential Chinese intellectual most people have never heard of. In this lecture, Leigh Jenco will explain why we should care about Zhang, a political theorist who combined liberal and Confucian ideas to think about how individuals can make a difference. Working at a time of unprecedented change in Chinese society, he confronted a dilemma of global importance: How can we act together when no shared space or identity yet exists?

 

 

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