2012/2013 Lectures and Events

July 2013

LSE IDEAS Public Lecture: "John F Kennedy's Quest for Peace"

Date: Monday 15 July 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Jeffrey D Sachs
Chair: Professor Craig Calhoun

Photograph of Jeffrey Sachs @ Nigel Stead/LSEThe start of John F Kennedy’s presidency was marked by blunders and near-disasters, from the Bay of Pigs invasion to the Cuban Missile Crisis. The Crisis was a turning point – Kennedy retreated from the nuclear precipice with renewed confidence, and with the determination to chart and achieve a pathway to peace. Sachs will discuss the lessons of Kennedy’s 1963 campaign for peace and a nuclear test ban treaty, including the strategies for leadership and problem-solving in complex and dangerous international situations.

Professor Jeffrey D. Sachs (pictured) is a world-renowned professor of economics, leader in sustainable development, senior UN advisor, bestselling author, and syndicated columnist whose monthly newspaper columns appear in more than 80 countries.

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested. Tickets for this event will be available on Monday 8th July.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


June 2013

Department of Economics Public Lecture: "Against the Consensus: Reflections on the Great Recession"

Date: Monday 24 June 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Justin Lin
Chair: Professor Danny Quah|

This event marks the publication of Professor Lin's new book Against the Consensus: Reflections on the Great Recession.

In June 2008, Justin Yifu Lin was appointed Chief Economist of the World Bank, right before the eruption of the worst global financial and economic crisis since the Great Depression. Drawing on experience from his privileged position, Lin offers unique reflections on the cause of the crisis, why it was so serious and widespread, and its likely evolution. Arguing that conventional theories provide inadequate solutions, he proposes new initiatives for achieving global stability and avoiding the recurrence of similar crises in the future. He suggests that the crisis and the global imbalances both originated with the excess liquidity created by US financial deregulation and loose monetary policy, and recommends the creation of a global Marshall Plan and a new supranational global reserve currency. This thought-provoking book will appeal to academics, graduate students, policy makers, and anyone interested in the global economy. Justin’s other recent books include Demystifying the Chinese Economy, Cambridge University Press, 2011.

photograph of Justin LinJustin Lin is professor and honorary dean at the National School of Development at Peking University. He was the senior vice president and chief economist of the World Bank from 2008-2012. Prior to joining the Bank, Professor Lin served for 15 years as founding director and professor of the China Centre for Economic Research (CCER) at Peking University and is the author of 24 books including The Quest for Prosperity: How Developing Economies Can Take Off, New Structural Economics: A Framework for Rethinking Development and Policy, Demystifying the Chinese Economy, Benti and Changwu: Dialogues on Methodology in Economics, and Economic Development and Transition: Thought, Strategy, and Viability.

He is a member of the Standing Committee and vice chairman of the Economic Council, Chinese People’s Political Consultation Conference. He was vice chairman of the All-China Federation of Industry and Commerce. He served on several national and international committees, leading groups, and councils on development policy, technology, and environment including: Eminent Persons Council of the World Bank, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Steering Committee, the UN Millennium Task Force on Hunger; the Eminent Persons Group of the Asian Development Bank; the National Committee on United States-China Relations; the Global Agenda Council on the International Monetary System; Reinventing Bretton Woods Committee; and the Hong Kong-U.S. Business Council. He received honorary doctoral degrees from Universite D’Auvergne, Fordham University, Nottingham University, City University of Hong Kong, London School of Economics, and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and is a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the Academy of Sciences for Developing World.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSErecession

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7955 6043.

The video and the podcast of this lecture are now available at the LSE News and Media| pages.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "When the Money Runs Out: The End of Western Affluence"

Date: Wednesday 19 June 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Stephen King
Chair: Professor Wouter Den Haan|

The Western world has experienced extraordinary economic progress throughout the last six decades, a prosperous period so extended that continuous economic growth has come to seem normal. But such an era of continuously rising living standards is an historical anomaly, economist Stephen D. King warns, and the current stagnation of Western economies threatens to reach crisis proportions in the not-so-distant future. Praised for the 'dose of realism' he provided in his book Losing Control, King follows up in this volume with a plain-spoken assessment of where the West stands today. It's not just the end of an age of affluence, he shows. We have made promises to ourselves that are only achievable through ongoing economic expansion. The future benefits we expect - pensions, healthcare, and social security, for example - may be larger than tomorrow's resources. And if we reach that point, which promises will be broken and who will lose out? The lessons of history offer compelling evidence that political and social upheaval are often born of economic stagnation. King addresses these lessons with a multifaceted plan that involves painful - but necessary - steps toward a stable and just economic future.

Stephen King is HSBC’s Group Chief Economist and the Bank’s Global Head of Economics and Asset Allocation research. He is directly responsible for HSBC’s global economic coverage and co-ordinates the research of HSBC economists all over the world. He is currently the top-rated global economist in the annual Extel survey. His new book is When the Money Runs Out: The End of Western Affluence.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEaffluence

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7955 6043.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


May 2013

Department of International Development and STICERD Public Lecture: "The Amartya Sen Lecture at LSE"

Date: Wednesday 29 May 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Sir James Wolfensohn
Discussant: Professor Amartya Sen

James Wolfensohn was the ninth president of the World Bank.

photograph of Amaryta SenAmartya Sen (pictured left) is professor of economics at Harvard University and recipient of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Economics. He is an honorary fellow of LSE.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSESen

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required. One ticket per person can now be requested.

For further information about the event and tickets to attend, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


International Growth Centre Public Lecture: "Banker to the Poor: Lifting Millions Out of Poverty through Social Business"

Date: Monday 20 May 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Peacock Theatre
Speaker: Professor Muhammad Yunus
Chair: Professor Craig Calhoun

The IGC will be hosting Nobel Prize winner, Professor Muhammad Yunus at the London School of Economics for a lecture open to the general public, on Monday 20th May.

photograph of Muhammad Yunus @ Nigel Stead / LSEMuhammad Yunus was born on 28 June 1940 in the village of Bathua, Chittagong, a seaport in Bangladesh. The third of fourteen children, he was educated at Dhaka University and was awarded a Fulbright scholarship to study economics at Vanderbilt University. He then served as chairman of the economics department at Chittagong University before devoting his life to providing financial and social services to the poorest of the poor. He is the founder of Grameen Bank, serving as managing director until May 2011. Yunus is the author of the bestselling Banker to the Poor. In October 2006, Muhammad Yunus was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, along with Grameen Bank, for their efforts to create economic and social development. Muhammad Yunus was awarded an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Science (Economics) by LSE in November 2011. In April 2013 he received the US Congressional Gold Medal.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEYunus

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested.

Members of the public, LSE staff, students and alumni can request one ticket via the online ticket request form which will be live on this listing around 6pm on Monday 13 May until at least 12noon on Tuesday 14 May.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


Department of International Development Public Debate: "Does market-led development have a future?"

Date: Wednesday 15 May 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speakers: Dr Ha-Joon Chang, Professor Danny Quah
Chair: Professor Robert Wade

The debate is organized by the Development Management Programme, and features two world authorities on economic growth and development, Professor Danny Quah of the LSE, and Dr Ha-Joon Chang of Cambridge.

Photograph of Ha-Joon ChangHa-Joon Chang is one of the leading heterodox economists and institutional economists specialising in development economics. Currently Reader in the Political Economy of Development at the University of Cambridge, Chang is the author of several best-selling books, most notably Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategy in Historical Perspective (2002) and 23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism (2010). He has served as a consultant to the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank and the European Investment Bank as well as to Oxfam and various United Nations agencies. He is also a fellow at the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C.

photograph of Danny QuahProfessor Danny Quah| is Kuwait professor of Economics and International Development at LSE, Senior Fellow at LSE IDEAS, Chair of the LSE-PKU Summer School Board, Academic Director of LSE’s Executive Summer School, Director of Public Relations for the Economics Department, and Co-Director of LSE’s Kuwait Research Programme. Quah served on Malaysia’s National Economic Advisory Council 2009-2011; he was the first Head of Department for Economics at LSE 2006-2009.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEmarkets

The podcast of this lecture is now available through the LSE News and Media| pages.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


March 2013

Department of Economics & STICERD Public Discussion in association with the Bank of England: "What should economists and policymakers learn from the financial crisis?"

Date: Monday 25 March 2013
Time: 5.15-7pm
Venue: LSE campus, venue tbc to ticketholders
Speakers: Dr Ben S Bernanke, Olivier Blanchard, Professor Lawrence H. Summers, Axel A. Weber
Chair: Professor Sir Mervyn King

Five years on, the global economy continues to come to terms with the impact of the financial crisis. This event examines the lessons that both economists and policymakers should learn in order to lessen the chance of future crises.

                          Department of Economics and STICERD Public Discussion in association with the Bank of England © Nigel Stead/LSE

Ben S. Bernanke was sworn in on February 1, 2006, as chairman and a member of the board of governors of the Federal Reserve System. Before his appointment as chairman, Dr. Bernanke was chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers, from June 2005 to January 2006.

Olivier Blanchard is economic counsellor and director, Research Department at the International Monetary Fund. After obtaining his Ph.D in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1977, he taught at Harvard University, returning to MIT in 1982, where he has been since where he holds the post of Class of 1941 Professor of Economics.

Lawrence H. Summers is President Emeritus of Harvard University. During the past two decades he has served in a series of senior policy positions, including vice president of development economics and chief economist of the World Bank, undersecretary of the Treasury for International Affairs, director of the National Economic Council for the Obama administration from 2009 to 2011, and secretary of the treasury of the United States, from 1999 to 2001. He is currently the Charles W. Eliot University Professor at Harvard University.

Axel A. Weber is visiting professor of economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, former president of the Deutsche Bundesbank and current chairman of the board of UBS.

Mervyn King 2012Professor Sir Mervyn King is governor of the Bank of England. Before joining the Bank he was professor of economics at the LSE, and a founder of the Financial Markets Group.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #financialcrisis

Further information about ticket information and the returns queue is available in the LSE Public Events| page.

 


LSE Public Lecture: "China's Growth: The Making of an Economic Superpower"

Date: Thursday 21 March 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Dr Linda Yueh
Chair: Professor Danny Quah|

Photograph of Linda YuehWhat drives China's impressive growth and will it continue? Parsing the evidence leads to some surprising conclusions and also points to needed reforms to sustain development in the coming decades.

Linda Yueh is director of the China Growth Centre and fellow in economics at St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford. She is also adjunct professor of economics at the London Business School. Linda's new book is entitled China's Growth: The Making of an Economic Superpower.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEChina

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 6043.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


February 2013

LSE Space for Thought Literary Festival 2013: "Branching Out", 26 February to 2 March

Literary Festival 2013 Branching Out|The programme for LSE's fifth Literary Festival, which will be taking place from Thursday 26 February to Sunday 2 March 2013, has been announced.

In 2013, the Festival will explore the theme Branching Out, in celebration of the fifth anniversary traditionally marked by wood, but also in homage to the 300th anniversary of the birth of Denis Diderot, who developed the figurative system of branches of human knowledge.

Key 'branches' that will be explored include Narratives, Innovation, Changing World and Uniting the Branches of Knowledge. Speakers will include Hans Rosling, P D James, Kate Mosse, Professor Lord Hennessey, Anne Applebaum, Ken Livingstone, John Gray, Jenny Uglow, Will Hutton, Polly Toynbee, Michael Wood, Pat Barker and many more.

PPhotograph of Tim Besleyrofessor Tim Besley| (pictured right), School Professor of Economics and Political Science, will be among the speakers discussing the presentation of scientific topics in the media. The title of the session is: 'Altered States: what happens when we tell stories about science?', taking place on Wednesday 27th February at 7pm. More information about the specific talk at the LSE Public Events| page.

The programme also includes a series of creative writing workshops and fun events for children. Tickets will be available online from Monday 4 February. Full details can be found at LSE Space for Thought Literary Festival 2013|.


2013 Economica Coase Lecture: "Foreign Trade and Investment: Firm-Level Perspectives"

Date: Thursday 21 February 2013
Time: 6:30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Elhanan Helpman, Harvard University
Chair: Professor Tim Besley|, Department of Economics, LSE

photograph of Elhanan HelpmanDuring the last decade the analysis of foreign trade and investment has been re-oriented toward the roles played by firms with different characteristics. This has been enabled by the emergence of rich data sets that provide new stylized facts on trade and investment. In response, new theoretical models have been developed to explain these patterns and to re-examine a host of issues, such as the effects of trade policy on productivity and trade openness on inequality. The lecture will review these developments.

Elhanan Helpman (pictured) is the Galen L. Stone Professor of International Trade at Harvard University and a Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. He holds a BA degree in Economics and Statistics from Tel Aviv University, an MA degree in Economics from the same institution, and a PhD degree in Economics from Harvard University. He was the Archie Sherman Professor of International Economic Relations at Tel Aviv University before moving to Harvard.

Helpman is a cofounder of the "new trade theory'' and the "new growth theory,'' which emphasize the roles of economies of scale and imperfect competition. He was Co-Editor of the Journal of International Economics, Editor of the European Economic Review, and is currently an Editor of the Quarterly Journal of Economics. He is a member of the Israeli Academy of Sciences and Humanities, a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy, a member of the European Academy of Sciences and Arts and a Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association. He was President of the Israeli Economic Association and President of the Econometric Society. He received the Mahalanobis Memorial Medal, the Bernhard Harms Prize, the Rothschild Prize, the EMET Prize, the Nemmers Prize, the Onassis Prize and the Israel Prize.

Hosted jointly by Economica and the Department of Economics, the annual Economica Coase-Phillips Lectures were named to reflect the authorship of two of the most famous articles ever published in Economica (the 'Phillips Curve' article was the most heavily-cited macroeconomics title of the 20th century; Ronald Coase won the Nobel Prize for his work on the theory of the firm which began with his Economica article).

Following the inaugural lecture by Oliver Hart in 2007, the Economica Coase-Phillips lectures have played host to Robert Lucas, Jean Tirole, Thomas Sargent, Ernst Fehr and Christopher Pissarides; for more information about the lecture series, please visit the Economica| website.

This event is free and open to all, with no ticket required.


Department of Economics Public Lecture: "Economic Development and Social Technology"

Date: Tuesday 5 February 2013
Time: 6.30-8.00pm
Venue: Vera Anstey Room, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Kang Chul-Kyu, President, Woosuk University
Chair: Professor Danny Quah|, Kuwait Professor of Economics and International Development, LSE

In economic development, intangible social technologies — institutions, organisations, and management capabilities — matter critically, perhaps even more so than hard, physical technologies. Professor Kang’s lecture discusses the empirical evidence on this, and shows how every critical juncture in human history sees the emergence of key defining social technologies, technologies that shape national destiny as profoundly as they do economic development. It is thus social technology that leads economic and historical development. He will also briefly touch on how Chaebol reform in Korea occupies a fascinating nexus in the development of this hypothesis.

photograph of Kang Chul-KyuProfessor Kang Chul-Kyu (pictured) is President of Woosuk University in Wanju, Korea. A graduate of Seoul National University, he earned his PhD in Economics from Northwestern University, majoring in economic theory. His research interests include international organisation and economic development.

Professor Kang served for most of his academic career as Professor of Economics at the University of Seoul. He has been active in both the civic and political arenas, serving as Co-Representative of Civil Coalition of Economic Justice, and recently Chairman of the Nomination Committee for General Elections of the Democratic United Party.

He has worked for previous governments as Co-Chairman with the Prime Minister of the Presidential Regulatory Reform Committee, First Chairman (Senior Minister) of the Independent Commission Against Corruption and Chairman (Senior Minister) of the Fair Trade Commission.

This event is free and open to all, with no ticket required.


January 2013

Investing in Prosperity – Launch of the LSE Growth Commission

Date: Thursday 31 January 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speakers: Professor Tim Besley, Professor Francesco Caselli, Sir Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Professor Lord Stern and Professor John van Reenen
Chair: Professor Craig Calhoun

Having sifted through the evidence throughout 2012, the distinguished group of LSE Growth Commissioners launch the report of their findings on the design of a strategy to support UK growth. 

Tim Besley| is LSE professor of economics and political science; co-chair of the commission. 

Francesco Caselli| is professor of economics at LSE.

Richard Lambert is chancellor, University of Warwick and former director general of the Confederation of British Industry.

Rachel Lomax is non-executive director of HSBC, former deputy governor of the Bank of England and permanent secretary of three government departments. 

Nicholas Stern| is IG Patel chair and director, LSE Asia Research Centre. 

John van Reenen| is director of CEP and professor of economics; co-chair of the commission.

photograph of Tim Besley      photograph of Francesco Caselli      photograph of Nicholas Stern      photograph of John Van Reenen
Prof. Besley                  Prof. Caselli                   Prof. Lord Stern             Prof. Van Reenen

Running order:

• Welcome from Prof Craig Calhoun
• Tim Besley - Introduction & The Economic Story of the UK
• John Van Reenen - Human Capital
• Nick Stern - Infrastructure
• Richard Lambert - Finance & Innovation
• Francesco Caselli - GDP and Beyond
• Rachel Lomax - How do we get where we want to go?
• Questions from the audience

For more information about the Growth Commission and its members please view LSE Growth Commission|

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEgrowth

Ticket Information: This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required. One ticket per person can now be requested via the LSE Public Events| pages.

Media queries: please contact the Press Office if you would like to reserve a press seat or have a media query about this event, email pressoffice@lse.ac.uk|.

The podcast for this event is now available at the LSE News and Media| pages.


CEP and LSE Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "Eurozone Deadlock – Finding a Path Out of the Crisis "

Eurozone Deadlock – Finding a Path Out of the Crisis

Date: Wednesday 23 January 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Professor Luis Garicano 

photograph of Luis GaricanoIt is still possible to find a way out of the Eurozone crisis if policy-makers address two problems: dealing with the legacy costs of the initially flawed design of the Eurozone, and fixing the design itself.

Luis Garicano| (pictured) is professor and head of the Managerial Economics and Strategy Group in the LSE’s Department of Management.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


Department of Economics Public Discussion: "Masters of the Universe"

Masters of the Universe: Hayek, Friedman, and the Birth of Neoliberal Politics

Date: Wednesday 16 January 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Dr Daniel Stedman Jones
Respondents: Professor Mark Pennington, Professor Lord Skidelsky
Chair: Professor Stuart Corbridge

poster for the lecture: Masters of the UniverseHow did American and British policymakers become so enamoured with free markets, deregulation, and limited government? Based on archival research and interviews with leading participants in the movement, Daniel Stedman Jones has traced the ascendancy of neoliberalism from the academy of interwar Europe to supremacy under Reagan and Thatcher and in the decades since. He contends that there was nothing inevitable about the victory of free-market politics. Far from being the story of the simple triumph of right-wing ideas, the neoliberal breakthrough was contingent on the economic crises of the 1970s and the acceptance of the need for new policies by the political left. In his lecture he will describe neoliberalism's road to power, beginning in interwar Europe, then shifting its centre of gravity after 1945 to the United States, especially to Chicago and Virginia, where it was developed into an uncompromising political message, communicated through a transatlantic network of think tanks, businessmen, politicians, and journalists held together by Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman. A discussion for anyone who wants to understand the history behind the Anglo-American love affair with the free market, as well as the origins of the current economic crisis.

Daniel Stedman Jones is a barrister in London. He was educated at the University of Oxford and at the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned a PhD in history. He has worked as a policy adviser for the New Opportunities Fund and as a researcher for Demos. His latest book is Masters of the Universe: Hayek, Friedman, and the Birth of Neoliberal Politics.

Mark Pennington is Professor of Public Policy and Political Economy, King's College, University of London, prior to which he spent eleven years at Queen Mary, University of London. He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics. Mark's work lies at the intersection of politics, philosophy and economics with a particular emphasis on the classical liberal tradition. His latest book, Robust Political Economy (2011: Cheltenham, Edward Elgar) examines challenges to classical liberalism derived from neo-classical economics, communitarian political theory and egalitarian ethics. From January 2013 Mark will be the European Editor of the Review of Austrian Economics.

Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Warwick. His three-volume biography of the economist John Maynard Keynes (1983, 1992, 2000) received numerous prizes, and he recently published Keynes: The Return of the Master.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.

The podcast of the discussion can be found at the LSE News and Media pages: Masters of the Universe: Hayek, Friedman, and the Birth of Neoliberal Politics|.

 

December 2012

CIBL and Department of Economics Public Lecture: "Demystifying the Chinese Economy"

Date: Tuesday 18 December 2012
Time: 6.45-8.15pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Justin Lin
Chair: Professor Danny Quah|

As a result of the miraculous growth since the market-oriented reform in 1979, China’s status in the global economy has dramatically changed. This speech will reflect on China’s unprecedented growth in the past 32 years, examine the reasons of that growth, and discuss prospects and challenges for China to maintain an eight-percent annual growth rate in the coming decades.

Justin Yifu Lin is the former World Bank chief economist and senior vice president, development economics. Lin is the founder and first director of the China Center for Economic Research and a former professor of economics at Peking University and at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Justin Lin is to receive an Honorary Degree from LSE – Doctor of Science (Economics).  

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


November 2012

Department of Economics Public Lecture: "More Relatively-Poor People in a Less Absolutely-Poor World"

Date: Thursday 22 November 2012
Time: 5-6pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Martin Ravallion
Chair: Professor Craig Calhoun

photograph of Martin RavallionRelative deprivation, shame and social exclusion matter to the welfare of people everywhere, but this fact is ignored by standard measures of economic performance, including poverty. The lecture will argue that such social effects on welfare call for a reconsideration of how we assess global poverty, but they do not support widely used measures of relative poverty. It is argued instead that a new class of measures is called for, and new estimates of global poverty are presented. The lecture will discuss the implications for thinking about development policy, including setting global development goals.

Martin Ravallion is Director of the World Bank’s Research Department and (from 2013) holds the Edmond D. Villani Chair of Economics at Georgetown University. He served as acting Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, Development Economics at the World Bank succeeding Justin Yifu Lin, and holding the post until Kaushik Basu took up the post. His main research interests over the last 25 years have concerned poverty and policies for fighting it. He has advised numerous governments and international agencies on this topic, and he has written extensively on this and other subjects in economics, including three books and 200 papers in scholarly journals and edited volumes. In 2012 he was awarded the John Kenneth Galbraith Prize. Prior to joining the Bank, Martin was on the faculty of the Australian National University (ANU). He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and has taught economics at LSE, Oxford University, the Australian National University, Princeton University and the Paris School of Economics.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 6043.

For further information, please visit the LSE Events| pages.

The video for this event is now online on the LSE News and Media| pages.


Department of Economics and LSE Kuwait Programme Public Lecture: "Economic Transition in the Arab World"

Economic Transition in the Arab world: Challenges and Opportunities

Date: Tuesday 13 November 2012
Time: 3-4pm
Venue: LSE campus, venue tbc to ticketholders
Speaker: David Lipton
Chair: Professor Danny Quah|

photograph of David LiptonAlmost two years after the start of the so-called "Arab Spring", the countries concerned are facing significant economic challenges, against the backdrop of a difficult global environment. While much attention is rightly being paid to near term economic stabilization, there is an historic opportunity for structural changes that would liberate economic forces, and allow these economies to generate the growth needed for increasing income and employment opportunities. Notwithstanding their own difficulties, advanced economies must help.

David Lipton (pictured, © International Monetary Fund) was appointed First Deputy Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund on September 1, 2011. Before joining the Fund, he was Special Assistant to the President, and Senior Director for International Economic Affairs. National Economic Council and National Security Council at the White House. He was a Managing Director at Citi, and also worked at Moore Capital Management and at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Mr Lipton served in the Clinton Administration at the Treasury Department, and as Assistant Secretary and Under Secretary of the Treasury for International Affairs. Before that, he was a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center of Scholars. From 1989 to 1992, he worked as Economic Advisor to the governments of Russia, Poland and Slovenia. Mr. Lipton began his career with eight years on the IMF staff. He has a Ph.D. and M.A. from Harvard University and a B.A. from Wesleyan University.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.

The podcast and video for this event is now online. Plese visit the Video and Audio| pages.


October 2012

LSE Kuwait Programme and Department of Economics Public Discussion: "The Gulf and the Global Economy"

The Gulf and the Global Economy: the state of the world

Date: Thursday 25 October 2012
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speakers: Arnab Das, Professor Iain Begg, Dr Gerard Lyons, Rachel Ziemba
Chair: Professor Danny Quah| (pictured)

photograph of Danny Quah at LSEAs US and European economies teeter on the verge of ever-greater slowdown, what prospects remain for growth elsewhere in the world?

Arnab Das is managing director of research, Roubini Global Economics.

Iain Begg is Professor at the European Institute, LSE.

Gerard Lyons is chief economist and group head, Global Research, Standard Chartered Bank.

Rachel Ziemba is director of Central and Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa (CEEMEA) and global macroeconomics at Roubini Global Economics.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.

The podcast for the discussion is available through the LSE News and Media podcast channel: The Gulf and the Global Economy: the state of the world|.


Department of Economics Public Lecture: "Adapt"

Adapt: Problem Solving in a Complex World

Date: Monday 15 October 2012
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Tim Harford
Chair: Dr. Francesco Nava| 

Photograph of Tim HarfordTim Harford combines biology, statistical physics, psychology and of course economics to explore how complex problems are solved, and the crucial role of learning from our apparently endless ability to screw up.

Tim Harford is the author of Adapt and The Undercover Economist. He is a senior columnist at the Financial Times, presenter of Radio 4's More or Less, and a visiting fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 6043.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.

The podcast for the lecture is available through the LSE Public Lectures and Events podcast channel: Adapt: Problem Solving in a New Complex World|.


LSE Public Lecture: "What I Learned by Doing Capitalism"

Date: Thursday 11 October 2012
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Dr William H Janeway
Discussant: Professor Dimitri Vayanos
Chair: Professor Craig Calhoun

Photograph of William JanewayIn this talk William Janeway will discuss his new book, Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy: Markets, Speculation and the State. The Innovation Economy begins with discovery and culminates in speculation. Over some 250 years, economic growth has been driven by successive processes of trial and error: upstream exercises in research and invention, and downstream experiments in exploiting the new economic space opened by innovation. Drawing on his professional experiences, William H. Janeway provides an accessible pathway for readers to appreciate the dynamics of the Innovation Economy. He combines personal reflections, from a career spanning forty years in venture capital, with the development of an original theory of the role of asset bubbles in financing technological innovation and of the role of the state in playing an enabling role in the innovation process. Today, with the state frozen as an economic actor and access to the public equity markets only open to a minority, the Innovation Economy is stalled; learning the lessons from this book will contribute to its renewal.

William H. Janeway has lived a double life of "theorist-practitioner," according to the legendary economist Hyman Minsky who first applied that term to him twenty-five years ago. In his role as "practitioner," Bill Janeway has built and led the Warburg Pincus Technology Investment team that provided financial backing to a series of companies making critical contributions to the internet economy, including BEA Systems, Veritas Software and Nuance Communications, the speech recognition company. He remains actively engaged as a Senior Advisor and Managing Director at Warburg Pincus.

As a "theorist," Janeway received a Ph.D in Economics from Cambridge University where he was a Marshall Scholar. His doctoral study on the formulation of economic policy following the Great Crash of 1929 was supervised by Keynes' leading student, Richard Kahn. Janeway went on to found the Cambridge Endowment for Research in Finance. Currently he serves as a Teaching Visitor at the Princeton University Economics Department and Visiting Scholar in the Economics Faculty of Cambridge University.

Janeway is a director of Magnet Systems, Nuance Communications, O'Reilly Media and a member of the Board of Managers of Roubini Global Economics. He is a member of the board of directors of the Social Science Research Council, and a co-founder and member of the Governing Board of the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET).

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| page. 

For a podcast of the lecture, please visit the LSE Public Lectures and Events podcast channel: What I Learned By Doing Capitalism|.


The Stamp Memorial Lecture: "Twenty Years of Inflation Targeting"

Date: Tuesday 9 October 2012
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: LSE campus, venue tbc to ticketholders
Speaker: Professor Sir Mervyn King
Chair: Professor Craig Calhoun 

Mervyn King 2012Since 2008, we have experienced the worst financial crisis and recession since the 1930’s. What challenges does this pose to the intellectual foundations of monetary policy? Do we need a new approach?

Mervyn King is the Governor of the Bank of England. Before joining the Bank he was Professor of Economics at the LSE, and a founder of the Financial Markets Group.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| page.

A podcast of this lecture is available through the LSE Public Lectures and Events podcasts channel: Twenty Years of Inflation Targeting|.


LSE Lecture: "Rebuilding Banking"

Date: Monday 1 October 2012
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: LSE campus, venue to be announced to ticket holders
Speaker: Stephen Hester
Chair: Professor Craig Calhoun

Lecture for LSE staff and students only.

Photograph of Stephen HesterStephen Hester took over as Royal Bank of Scotland CEO after the UK Government was forced to rescue the bank from the brink of collapse during the financial crisis. Three and a half years after launching its recovery plan, the bank is in much stronger health. But like the rest of the banking industry, RBS continues to confront serious reputational damage as past mistakes slowly come into full view of regulators, media, and the wider public. Hester will explain how a key linking factor behind the scandals currently affecting the industry has been its approach to customers. And he will argue that improving that approach is the key to fixing both the culture and performance of the banks we all rely on.

For further information, please visit the LSE Events page| (restricted access).

A podcast of this lecture is available through the LSE Public Lectures and Events podcasts and videos channel: Rebuilding Banking|.


Lectures and Events Archive

Click on the Lectures and Events Archive| to find out about the lectures and events that took place in previous years.

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