2010/2011 Lectures and Events

June 2011

The LSE Big Questions Lecture: "East beats West? Is the East taking over the world?"

Danny QuahDate: Thursday 30 June 2011
Time: 1-2.15pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Professor Danny Quah

Professor Danny Quah| will present the LSE Big Questions Lecture on "East beats West? Is the East taking over the world?". A highly interactive lecture for schools, the lecture will explore how the world is changing, with countries such as China and India becoming wealthier and more powerful than ever before.

Further details on this lecture can be found at the LSE Public Events| pages. 


LSE Arts Public Film Screening: "The Flaw"

Date: Monday 6 June 2011
Time: 6.30-8.30pm
Venue: Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building
Panellists: Professor Francesco Caselli, Philip Coggan, David Sington, Professor Robert Wade.

Today, a question haunts America: what exactly caused the world's greatest economy to crash and burn? And why is it so slow to recover? In THE FLAW Sundance award-winning documentary filmmaker David Sington sets out to find the answer.

Talking to some of the world's leading economists, such as the housing expert Robert Shiller, Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz, and economic historian Louis Hyman, as well as Wall Street insiders and victims of the crash such as Ed Andrews, a former economics correspondent of the New York Times who nevertheless found himself facing foreclosure and Andrew Luan, once a bond trader, now a Wall Street tour guide, the film presents a highly original and but compelling account of the forces that almost destroyed the world economy.

Using cartoons, some truly astonishing graphs and a generous dose of black humour, the film shows how the intellectual ascendancy of an idea – that markets are wiser than individuals – led to policies that changed the way the American economy works, creating a vastly profitable financial sector that in turn drove a massive upwards redistribution of US income. This created the conditions for a housing bubble that still threatens to pauperise whole sections of the American middle class. A system that had once raised living standards for the whole population had become a game where 1% win, and 90% lose. The film argues that we won't solve our problems until we recognize that a reasonably equitable division of the spoils of capitalism is essential to its smooth functioning.

THE FLAW tells the untold story of the financial credit bubble which caused the financial crash. With testimony from bankers, borrowers, brokers and some of the best economics brains in the world, the film challenges easy assumptions about this being simply a tale of greedy bankers and poor regulation. With the imaginative use of archive, harrowing personal stories and gripping graphics, the film shows how excessive income inequality in society leads to economic instability.

The film is the definitive account of the roots, in the USA of the biggest economic crisis to hit the world since the 1930s – a crisis which is causing suffering to many millions of people. At a time when economic theory and public policy is being re-examined this film is an important intervention in that debate, with some sobering lessons for the future.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with:

Professor Francesco Caselli| is the Director of Macroeconomics Program in the Centre for Economic Performance and Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics here at LSE.

Philip Coggan is the Buttonwood columnist of The Economist. Previously, he worked for the Financial Times for 20 years, most recently as Investment Editor. In that post, he founded the "Short View" column and wrote the "Long View" and "Last Word" columns. In 2009, he was voted Senior Financial Journalist of the Year in the Wincott awards and best communicator in the business journalist of the year awards. Among his books are The Money Machine, a guide to the city that is still in print after 25 years and The Economist Guide to Hedge Funds.

David Sington, Director of The Flaw, has been making award-winning films for twenty years. He has filmed on every continent on the planet, from the Amazon to the Antarctic. His films have helped to free the innocent, convict the guilty and have changed government policy. He has won numerous awards, including a Grierson Award, two WildScreen Pandas, and Gold and Silver Hugos. His most recent film, In the Shadow of the Moon about the Apollo astronauts, was an Audience Award winner at the Sundance Festival and became one of the best-reviewed cinema releases of 2007, with general releases in the USA, UK, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Germany and France.

Professor Robert Wade is Professor of Political Economy and Development in the Department of International Development here at LSE.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


March 2011

LSE OECD Seminar: "OECD at 50, Better Policies for Better Lives"

Date: Wednesday 16 March 2011
Time: 10.30am-4.45pm
Speakers: Vince Cable, Jonathan Coppel, Howard Davies, Siddharth George, Joe Grice, Angel Gurria, Dr John Llewellyn, Jim O'Neill, Pier Carlo Padoan, Professor Danny Quah, Gabriela Ramos, David Ramden, Professor Keith Smith

As the OECD starts its next 50 years, the global economic governance system is evolving dramatically. The G20 has become the premier global economic forum and economic dynamism and political influence will continue to shift East and South. What are the likely global economic challenges that tomorrow's economic policy makers will be faced with, how will the OECD support global cooperation and where will the solutions be found?

This seminar is free and open to all LSE staff and students, but a ticket is required. Tickets will be available from Tuesday 8 March from the New Academic Building SU shop, located on the Kingsway side of the building from 10.00am.

For more information about the programme, click at the LSE Public Events| pages.   


Centre for Economic Performance 21st Birthday Lecture Series: "Changes in Labour Market Inequality"

Date: Tuesday 15 March 2011
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Stephen Machin

In this lecture, the third in a series to celebrate 21 years of the CEP|, Stephen Machin surveys significant research findings on wage inequality that have emerged from the Centre over the past three decades.

Stephen Machin is director of research at CEP, and professor of economics at University College London.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.  


LSE SU Economics Society Conference:
"The New Global Economy: Policy and Financial Markets"

Date: Saturday 12 March 2011
Time: 10.30am-6pm
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speakers: Sir Samuel Brittan, Francesco Caselli, Colin Mayer, Richard Moat, Dr Richard Wellings

The conference seeks to explain the current global dilemmas of both the public and private sectors, providing an insight into possible solutions. This project is jointly organised by the LSE SU Economics Society and the LSE SU Finance Society. The speakers are all eminent in their fields and from across the UK, and the rest of the world. They will give their insight and opinions and challenge both the audience and each other to think in a different way on these key topics.

Sir Samuel Brittan, Financial Times columnist. Francesco Caselli|, Professor of Economics at LSE. Colin Mayer, Dean of Oxford's Said Business School and co-founder of the European Corporate Governance Institute. Richard Moat, managing director of T-Mobile UK. Dr Richard Wellings, deputy editorial director of the Institute of Economic Affairs.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


February 2011

2011 Economica Coase Lecture: "The Lure of Authority: Motivation and Incentive Effects of Power"

Date: Thursday 24 February 2011
Time: 6:30-8:00pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Ernst Fehr
Chair: Professor Frank Cowell|

Authority and power permeate political, social, and economic life - yet there is limited empirical knowledge about the motivational origins and consequences of authority. Based on an experimental approach, Ernst Fehr's lecture will explore the psychological consequences of authority for important economic interactions. He will document the human desire to exercise authority, the motivation-enhancing effect of possessing authority and the detrimental motivational effects of a lack of authority.

Ernst Fehr is director of the Department of Economics at the University of Zurich. He has conducted influential research on the role of social preferences in competition, cooperation and incentive provision.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

Further information is available through the LSE Public Events| pages.

The video and audio podcast of this event are available to download from the LSE News and Media| pages and via the Department of Economics YouTube channel|.


LSE SU Economics Society Student Presentations - Scientific Competition: Economics Policy Challenge

Date: Tuesday 22 February 2011
Time: 7.30-9pm
Venue: TWR1.U8, Tower 1

60 applicants from a number of Universities all over the world participated in this competition. Many papers were submitted. Top 3 were chosen to give their presentations on this day. Only 1 will be selected by distinguished judges to be awarded 1,000! Topics of submissions include: Demography. Education. Monetary Economics. Development Economics. Innovation. Behavioral Economics.

The judges include Alistair Darling MP (former UK Chancellor of the Exchequer), Professor Julian Le Grand (Professor of Social Policy, LSE), and Professor Francesco Caselli| (Professor of Economics, LSE).

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages. 


LSE Works - Centre for Economic Performance:
"Where is Future Growth Going to Come From?"

Date: Thursday 17 February 2011
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker: Professor John Van Reenen
Respondent: Professor Jonathan Haskel
Chair: Professor Steve Machin

Where will the sources of new growth come from in the wake of the financial crisis and recession? What is the role of education, labour markets and government policy in supporting this growth?

Photograph of John Van ReenenJohn Van Reenen| has been professor of economics at LSE and the director of the Centre for Economic Performance, since October 2003.

Jonathan Haskel is a Professor of Economics at Imperial College Business School based in the Healthcare Management and Innovation and Enterprise Group.

The CEP| is an interdisciplinary research centre at the LSE Research Laboratory. It was established by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) in 1990 and is now one of the leading economic research groups in Europe. The CEP studies the determinants of economic performance at the level of the company, the nation and the global economy by focusing on the major links between globalisation, technology and institutions (above all the educational system and the labour market) and their impact on productivity, inequality, employment, stability and wellbeing.

LSE Works| is a new series of public lectures, sponsored by SAGE publications|, that will showcase some of the latest research by LSE's Research Centres. In each
session, LSE academics will present key research findings, demonstrating where appropriate the implications of their studies for public policy. A list of all the LSE Works| lectures can be viewed online.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


The Nobel Lecture: "Equilibrium in the Labour Market with Search Frictions"

Date: Tuesday 15 February 2011
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Christopher Pissarides
Chair:  Howard Davies
This event was recorded on 15 February 2011 in Old Theatre, Old Building

photograph of Christopher PissaridesProfessor Christopher Pissarides| was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize for Economic Sciences in 2010 (jointly with Peter Diamond and Dale Mortensen) for their work on the economics of unemployment, especially job flows and the effect of being out of work. Christopher Pissarides is professor of economics at LSE and holder of the Norman Sosnow Chair in Economics.

For more information and the podcast go to LSE Podcasts: February 2011|. For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


Department of Management Lecture:
"How Life In The Internet Changes The Practice Of Macroeconomics"

Date: Monday 14 February 2011
Time: 6.30-8.15pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Edward Hugh
Chair: Professor Luis Garicano

A surprising feature of economic analysis of the current crisis has been the pivotal role played by a small number of bloggers, often positioned far from the academic mainstream. This event will feature one of the top bloggers on the Euro Crisis who will discuss the role the bloggers have played in our understanding of the current Euro Crisis, and in what ways having more data in our hard drive than the sum total of all previous economists changes our understanding of macroeconomics.

Edward Hugh is an independent macro economist based in Barcelona. He studied at the LSE, where he obtained his BSc (econ). He then went to Manchester University where he was awarded an MSc in the philosophy and sociology of science. He subsequently pursued doctoral studies there for a thesis which was never completed.
He is a regular contributor to a number of weblogs, including A Fistful of Euros, Roubini Global Economics Monitor, Global Economy Matters and Demography Matters. He also has an active and widely followed Facebook community. For more information on Edward Hugh see the recent profile in the New York Times.

Luis Garicano| is a Professor of Economics and Strategy at the LSE's departments of Management and Economics.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


British Government@LSE Public Debate:
"To cut or not to cut? Debating the comprehensive spending review"

Date: Friday 4 February 2011
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speakers: Professor Timothy Besley, Professor Simon Hix, Dr Jonathan Hopkin, Martin Wolf

A panel of experts debate the political and economic implications of the unprecedented fiscal adjustment undertaken by the Conservative-Lib Dem coalition government.

Tim BesleyTimothy Besley| is director of STICERD, EOPP Associate and Kuwait Professor of Economics and Political Science.
Simon Hix is professor of European and comparative politics at LSE.
Jonathan Hopkin is senior lecturer in British and comparative politics at LSE.
Martin Wolf is associate editor and chief economics commentator at the Financial Times.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages. 


January 2011

Department of Economics Public Lecture:
"Phase Three of the Global Crisis"

Date: Monday 31 January 2011
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Paul Mason

As countries adopt competitive exit strategies from the global crisis Paul Mason surveys the political economy of a flat recovery. He argues that mainstream economics have still refused to draw the lessons of asset price bubbles and situates the divergent recovery, east and west, within a long-wave explanation of the crisis.

Paul Mason is the award-winning economics editor of BBC Newsnight, covering an agenda he describes as 'profit, people and planet' and author of the Idle Scrawl blog , which was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize 2009. His first book, Live Working or Die Fighting: How the Working Class Went Global, was long listed for the Guardian First Book Award.

This event marks the publication of his latest book Meltdown: The End of the Age of Greed|.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


Ralph Miliband Series:
"The Tensions of International Power: Restructuring in a Shifting Global Economy"

Date: Monday 17 January 2011
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Danny Quah
Chair: Professor David Held

Danny QuahDoes economic strength determine global power? How long can under-performing
economies continue to claim world political leadership? Danny Quah presents the arguments and evaluates the evidence.

Danny Quah| is professor of economics at LSE and co-director of LSE Global Governance.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


December 2010

STICERD and The Paul Woolley Centre for the Study of Capital Market Dysfunctionality Public Lecture: "Economic Sciences as Mostly a Procrustean Bed"

Date: Tuesday 7 December 2010
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Nassim Nicholas Taleb
Chair: Professor Dimitri Vayanos

We cover the inapplicability of economic methods statistically, methodologically, empirically, and, mostly, ethically.

Nassim Nicholas Taleb is Distinguished Professor of Risk Engineering, NYU, and author of The Bed of Procrustes: Philosophical and Practical Aphorisms. His previous books Fooled by Randomness and The Black Swan have been published in thirty-one languages.

This event marks the launch of Taleb's new book "The Bed of Procrustes: Philosophical and Practical Aphorisms".

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages. 


November 2010

STICERD Public Lecture: "Zombie Economics: How Dead Ideas Still Walk among Us"

Date: Thursday 25 November 2010
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Professor John Quiggin
Chair: Professor Andrea Prat

The recent financial crisis laid bare many of the assumptions behind market liberalism--the theory that market-based solutions are always best, regardless of the problem. For decades, their advocates dominated mainstream economics, and their influence created a system where an unthinking faith in markets led many to view speculative investments as fundamentally safe. The crisis seemed to have killed off these ideas, but they still live on in the minds of many-- even some of those charged with cleaning up the mess. John Quiggin explains how these dead ideas still walk among us--and why we must find a way to kill them once and for all if we are to avoid an even bigger financial crisis in the future.

John Quiggin is professor of economics at the University of Queensland in Australia.  

Andrea Prat| is Professor of Economics at the Department of Economics at LSE.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


LSE SU Economics Society Lecture:
"The Rise of the Chinese Economy"

Date: Friday 12 November 2010
Time: 4-5.30pm
Venue: CLM.D202, Clement House
Speaker: Dr Linda Yueh

In this event, Linda Yueh will be speaking about her latest book, which is written to serve as a comprehensive text on the economy of China and its future direction. She will examine the main contributors to China's prolific growth, as well as the challenges it might face in the future from her perspective - having had a stellar academic career as one of the leading commentators on this issue.

photograph of Linda YuehLinda Yueh is an economist, broadcaster and author. A fellow in economics at Oxford University, she is an economics correspondent for Bloomberg TV. She directs the China Growth Centre (CGC) at St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford, is an associate of the Globalisation programme of the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) and the IDEAS: International Affairs, Diplomacy & Strategy research centre both at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and is a fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts (FRSA). She has appeared on television on channels such as BBC, CNBC and Bloomberg multiple times in a variety of positions - commentator, host and co-host - of some of the most-watched programmes on business television.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


Department of Economics and STICERD Public Lecture: "Towards a New Financial System"

Date: Tuesday 9 November 2010
Time: 2-3pm
Location: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: José Viñals
Chair: Professor Albert Marcet

José Viñals was appointed to the position of Financial Counsellor and Director of the Monetary and Capital Markets Department of the International Monetary Fund on April 15, 2009. Prior to his appointment, Mr. Viñals was Deputy Governor at the Bank of Spain from July 2006.

After joining the Bank of Spain in 1984, he held a number of senior positions and has served on a range of advisory and policy committees at the central bank and within the European Union, including as Chairman of the European Central Bank's International Relations Committee.

A former faculty member in the Economics Department at Stanford University, he holds a master's degree in economics from the London School of Economics and a PhD in economics from Harvard University. Mr. Viñals has published widely on macroeconomics, monetary policy, and financial issues, and is a research fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research. Mr. Viñals is a citizen of Spain, and is married with four children.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


Department of Economics and CEP 21st Birthday Public Lecture: "The State of the World Economy"

Date: Thursday 4 November 2010
Time: 6.30-8pm
Location: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Olivier Blanchard

A strong and sustained world recovery requires two rebalancing acts. Internal, with a shift, in advanced countries, from fiscal support to private demand. External, with an increase in net exports in deficit countries, notably the US, and a decrease in net exports in surplus countries, notably China. Policy should be aimed at increasing their pace.

This lecture is one in a series of lectures to celebrate 21 years of the Centre for Economic Performance|.

Olivier Blanchard is Economic Counsellor and Director of the Research Department at the IMF and has worked closely with the CEP over the last 25 years.

A citizen of France, Olivier Blanchard has spent his professional life in Cambridge, U.S. After obtaining his Ph.D in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1977, he taught at Harvard University, returning to MIT in 1982, where he has been since then. He is the Class of 1941 Professor of Economics, and past Chair of the Economics Department. He is currently on leave from MIT, as Economic Counsellor and Director of the Research Department of the International Monetary Fund.

He is a macroeconomist, who has worked on a wide set of issues, from the role of monetary policy, to the nature of speculative bubbles, to the nature of the labor market and the determinants of unemployment, to transition in former communist countries. In the process, he has worked with numerous countries and international organizations. He is the author of many books and articles, including two textbooks in macroeconomics, one at the graduate level with Stanley Fischer, one at the undergraduate level.

He is a fellow and Council member of the Econometric Society, a past vice president of the American Economic Association, and a member of the American Academy of Sciences.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.  


Department of Economics Public Lecture:
"Phase Three of the Global Crisis"

Date: Monday 1 November 2010
Time: 6.30-8pm
Location: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Paul Mason
Chair: Professor Alan Manning|

As countries adopt competitive exit strategies from the global crisis Paul Mason surveys the political economy of a flat recovery. He argues that mainstream economics have still refused to draw the lessons of asset price bubbles and situates the divergent recovery, east and west, within a long-wave explanation of the crisis.

Paul Mason is the award-winning economics editor of BBC Newsnight, covering an agenda he describes as 'profit, people and planet' and author of the Idle Scrawl blog, which was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize 2009. His latest book is Meltdown: The End of the Age of Greed.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 6043.


October 2010

Department of Economics Public Discussion:
"The Economist as Philosopher"

Date: Wednesday 6 October 2010
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speakers: Nicholas Phillipson, Professor Lord Skidelsky
Chair: Dr Ethan Ilzetzki|

The Economist as Philosopher: Adam Smith and John Maynard Keynes on human nature, social progress and economic change

Robert Skidelsky and Nicholas Phillipson discuss how the philosophies of Keynes and Smith helped shape their influential economic ideas and examine how each has influenced social and political change.

Nicholas Phillipson is Honorary Research Fellow in History at Edinburgh, where he has taught since 1965. He has held visiting appointments at Princeton, Yale, Tulsa, the Folger Library, Washington DC and the Ludwigs-Maximilian Universitat, Munich. He is co-director of a three-year Leverhulme-funded project on the Science of Man in Scotland. He was an associate editor of the New Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, a founder editor of the journal Modern Intellectual History, published by the Cambridge University Press, and is a past president of the Eighteenth Century Scottish Studies Society. His new book is Adam Smith: An Enlightened Life|.

Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Warwick. His three-volume biography of the economist John Maynard Keynes (1983, 1992, 2000) received numerous prizes, including the Lionel Gelber Prize for International Relations and the Council on Foreign Relations Prize for International Relations. He is the author of The World After Communism (1995) (American edition called The Road from Serfdom). He was made a life peer in 1991, and was elected Fellow of the British Academy in 1994. His latest book is Keynes: The Return of the Master|.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


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