2008/2009 Lectures and Events

September 2009

International Growth Centre Growth Week Public Lecture: "Green Growth"

Date: Thursday 24 September 2009
Time: 12.30-1.30pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speakers: Professor Lord Stern|
Chair: Howard Davies

Over the next few years, we have a real chance to set a path towards a low-carbon future. It is the only realistic future for growth and for overcoming world poverty. The global economic downturn is an opportunity to invest in green technology while costs are lower.

Nicholas SternNick Stern| is IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government at LSE and chairman of LSE's new Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. He also directs the Asia Research Centre and the India Observatory at LSE. He was Chief Economist of the World Bank (2000-2003), then Head of the UK Government Economic Service and led a Review of the Economics of Climate Change which was published in October 2006. In October 2007 he was appointed to the House of Lords as a non-party political peer.

The next public event in Growth Week will be on the evening of Thursday 24 September, and will be a public lecture on Developing Rural Areas| by Professor Esther Duflo.

The International Growth Centre| promotes sustainable growth in developing countries by providing demand-led policy advice based on frontier research. Based at LSE and in partnership with Oxford University, the IGC was initiated by and is funded by DFID.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


International Growth Centre Growth Week Public Lecture: "The Political Economy of Development"

Date: Wednesday 23 September 2009
Time: 7-8.30pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Professor Tim Besley|
Chair: Professor Robin Burgess|

It is widely recognised that the interplay of political and economic forces has a major bearing on the path of development. How do the developments in the recent political economy literature bear on the practical problems that some countries face in achieving sustainable development paths?

Tim BesleyTim Besley| is Professor of Economics and Political Science at the London School of Economics, and served on the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee from September 2006 until August 2009. He is director of the Suntory Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines (STICERD) at LSE. He previously taught at Princeton University, and is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, and the Centre for Economic Policy Research. His work focuses mainly on issues in development economics, public economics and political economy. He has published widely on a variety of topics, mainly with a policy focus. He has been a Co-Editor of the American Economic Review, and Editor of the Economic Journal. He currently serves on the editorial boards of numerous other professional journals. His professional honours include being a Fellow of the British Academy, a Fellow of the Econometric Society and a British Academy Research Reader. In 2005, he won the prestigious biannual Yrjö Jahnsson Award for his research. He was educated at Oxford University (BA in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, 1st, M.Phil and a D.Phil in Economics) where he became a Prize Fellow of All Souls College.

The International Growth Centre| promotes sustainable growth in developing countries by providing demand-led policy advice based on frontier research. Based at LSE and in partnership with Oxford University, the IGC was initiated by and is funded by DFID.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


June 2009

Lionel Robbins Memorial Lectures:
"The Return of Depression Economics Part 3"

The Return of Depression Economics Part 3: The night they reread Minsky

Date: Wednesday 10 June 2009
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Paul Krugman
Chair: Professor Danny Quah|

Paul_KrugmanThe global economic crisis has shaken a lot of what we thought we knew about economics. Over three consecutive evenings, Professor Krugman will cover the causes of the crisis; the deeply vexed question of how and when the world economy can recover; and the implications of the whole mess for economics and economists.

Paul Krugman is centenary professor at LSE and professor of economics and international affairs at Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University. In 2008 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


Lionel Robbins Memorial Lectures:
"The Return of Depression Economics Part 2"

The Return of Depression Economics Part 2: The eschatology of lost decades

Date: Tuesday 9 June 2009
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Paul Krugman
Chair: Professor Lord Richard Layard

Paul_KrugmanThe global economic crisis has shaken a lot of what we thought we knew about economics. Over three consecutive evenings, Professor Krugman will cover the causes of the crisis; the deeply vexed question of how and when the world economy can recover; and the implications of the whole mess for economics and economists.

Paul Krugman is centenary professor at LSE and professor of economics and international affairs at Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University. In 2008 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


Lionel Robbins Memorial Lectures: 
"The Return of Depression Economics Part 1"

The Return of Depression Economics Part 1: The sum of all fears 

Date: Monday 8 June 2009
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Paul Krugman
Chair: Howard Davies

Paul_KrugmanThe global economic crisis has shaken a lot of what we thought we knew about economics. Over three consecutive evenings, Professor Krugman will cover the causes of the crisis; the deeply vexed question of how and when the world economy can recover; and the implications of the whole mess for economics and economists.

Paul Krugman is centenary professor at LSE and professor of economics and international affairs at Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University. In 2008 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


May 2009

LSE IDEAS Roundtable:
"Rising Asia in the World Crisis"

Date: Tuesday 5 May 2009
Time: 6-7.30pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speakers: Professor Athar Hussain, Professor Chen Jian, Professor Danny Quah
Chair: Professor Arne Westad

Asia's rise has brought about profound changes to the international system and the current world crisis presents the continent with both opportunities and challenges. The initiatives and responses by Asian countries, China and India in particular, have the potential to define the world's path of development now and in the future.

Chen Jian holds the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs at LSE IDEAS for 2008-09 and is the Michael J Zak Chair of the History of US China Relations at Cornell University. Danny Quah| is head of department and professor of economics at LSE. Athar Hussain is director of the Asia Research Centre, LSE.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


March 2009

LSE SU Economics Society Public Lecture: "The Credit Crunch - What happened and where next?"

Date: Monday 16 March 2009
Time: 6.30pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Rachel Lomax

Rachel Lomax will reflect on the global economic crisis and give her view on what has happened and where the economy may be heading next.

Rachel Lomax is a British economist and government official who served as Deputy Governor of the Bank of England from 2003 until June. Before joining the Bank, between 1999 and 2002 she was Permanent Secretary at the Department for Transport. She was a Vice President and Chief of Staff to the President of the World Bank in 1995-6 and Head of the Economic and Domestic Secretariat at the Cabinet Office in 1994. In 2008 she was appointed as a non-executive director of HSBC. The National Council for Voluntary Organisations recently launched a commission to investigate future charity funding, headed by Rachel Lomax.

Rachel Lomax graduated from Girton College, Cambridge with an MA, and obtained an MSc in Economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her earlier career was spent at HM Treasury, which she joined in 1968 and where she worked on a wide range of macroeconomic, monetary, and financial issues. She was Principal Private Secretary to the Chancellor of the Exchequer in the mid 1980s, and Deputy Chief Economic Adviser in the early 1990s gaining responsibility for financial regulation and city affairs in 1992. She is a non executive director of The Scottish American Investment Company and is on the Board of the Royal National Theatre and of De Montfort University.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


"Thinking Like a Social Scientist": a lecture by Professor Gilat Levy

Date: Wednesday 11 March 2009
Time: 1.05-2pm
Venue: U8, Tower 1
Speaker: Professor Gilat Levy| 

photograph of Gilat LevyIn this lunchtime series lectures, a selection of LSE's academics from across the spectrum of the social sciences explain the latest thinking on how social scientists work to address the critical problems of the day. They survey the leading ideas and contributions made by their discipline, explain the types of problems that are addressed and the tools that are used, and explore the kinds of solutions proposed.

Gilat Levy| is professor of economics at LSE.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


February 2009

2009 Economica-Coase Lecture:
"Individual and Corporate Social Responsibility"

Date: Thursday 19 February 2009
Time: 6:30-8:00pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Jean Tirole
Chair: Professor Chris Pissarides|

The Department of Economics is delighted to announce that the third annual Coase-Phillips lecture, hosted jointly by Economica and the Department of Economics, will be given by Professor Jean Tirole.

Professor Jean Tirole is one of the world's most eminent economists working in the fields of industrial organisation, game theory, banking and finance, and economics and psychology. He is director of the Fondation Jean-Jacques Laffont-Toulouse School of Economics, scientific director of the Institute d'Economie Industrielle in Toulouse and a visiting professor at MIT. Professor Tirole will speak on "Individual and Corporate Social Responsibility".

Further details on the lecture can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events|. pages. Download| the poster for the lecture.

The audio podcast of this event is available from the LSE News and Media| pages.


"Thinking Like a Social Scientist: public economics and pub economics"

Date: Wednesday 18 February 2009
Time: 1.05-2pm
Venue: U8, Tower 1
Speaker: Professor Nicholas Barr 

photograph of Nicholas BarrIn this lunchtime series lectures, a selection of LSE's academics from across the spectrum of the social sciences explain the latest thinking on how social scientists work to address the critical problems of the day. They survey the leading ideas and contributions made by their discipline, explain the types of problems that are addressed and the tools that are used, and explore the kinds of solutions proposed.

Nicholas Barr| is professor of public economics at LSE and the author of numerous books and articles on the economics of the welfare state and the finance of higher education. 

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


Department of Economics Panel Discussion: "The Global Economic Crisis - Meeting the Challenge"

Date: Tuesday 17 February 2009
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speakers: Professor Tim Besley, Professor Francesco Caselli, Professor Chris Pissarides, Professor Danny Quah
Chair: Professor Lord Richard Layard

A panel discussion on the current global economic crisis: its origins, transmission, and possible impact and resolution. Christopher_PissaridesDanny Quah

Francesco CaselliTim BesleyTim Besley|, Francesco Caselli|, Chris Pissarides| and Danny Quah| are all economics professors at LSE.

Further details on the panel discussion can be found at the LSE Public Events| pages.


Joint LSE/Cornell University Conference on Inequality: New Directions

Further details available from Inequality: New Directions Call for Papers|.


Hellenic Observatory Panel Debate:
"Fears, Risks and Opportunities: Greece and the Global Economic Crisis"

Date: Monday 9 February 2009
Time: 7-8.30pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speakers: Professor Nicos Christodoulakis, Stefanos Manos
Chair: Professor Christopher Pissarides|

What is the actual threat to the Greek economy from the global recession and which are the political and reform initiatives that could minimise its impact on growth and employment? The panel will debate on these pressing questions and discuss how Greece can respond to the challenge without putting social cohesion and Eurozone participation at risk.

Professor Nicos Christodoulakis is NBG Senior Research Fellow, Athens University of Economics and Business and former Hellenic Minister of Economy and Finance (2002-2004); Stefanos Manos is former Hellenic Minister of Economy and Finance (1992-1993); Professor Christopher Pissarides| is Norman Sosnow Chair in Economics, LSE.


LSESU Economics Society Public Lecture:
"Are the BRIC economies taking over the world?"

Date: Thursday 5 February 2009
Time: 6pm
Venue: New Theatre, East Building
Speaker: Dr Jim O'Neill
Chair: Professor Danny Quah|

In the lecture, Jim will be highlighting the following issues:

A) The Current Global Recession.
B) Relative trends in global recession
C) Can China Decouple from the US?
D) If so, can the world recouple to China instead of the US?
E) The Policy response to make China more sustainable
F) What BRIC can and needs to do.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


January 2009

Asia Research Centre series China - 30 Years of Reform and Future Prospects

The Shifting Distribution of World Economic Activity: China and global imbalance

Date: Tuesday 27 January 2009
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Professor Danny Quah|
Chair: Professor Athar Hussain

Danny QuahChina has, single-handedly, brought more people out of poverty than the rest of the world combined, and faster than anywhere else has been able to achieve. How can this continue?

Danny Quah| is professor of economics and head of the Department of Economics at LSE.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


December 2008

The Impact of the Global Economic Downturn on the World's Poorest Countries and The Launch of the International Growth Centre

Date: Wednesday 10 December 2008
Time: 5.30-6.30pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speakers: Douglas Alexander, Professor Robin Burgess, Professor Paul Collier, Gobind Nankani
Chair: Howard Davies

The UK's Secretary of State for International Development, Rt Hon Douglas Alexander MP, will speak on the impact of the global economic downturn on the world's poorest countries. He will outline what the credit crunch, and rising food and fuel prices means for the global efforts to tackle poverty. He will also launch the International Growth Centre, a new UK initiative to support long-term growth in poor countries and improve their ability to cope with economic shocks. The Centre will bring together policy-makers in developing countries with a range of partners from academia, the private sector and civil society from around the world.

Professor Paul Collier, Oxford University, will be speaking about the latest academic thinking on promoting growth in the world's poorest countries. Professor Robin Burgess, LSE, will present on how the International Growth Centre will support economic growth in developing countries.

Douglas Alexander was appointed Secretary of State for International Development on 28 June 2007 as part of Gordon Brown's first cabinet. Previously, he was Secretary of State for Transport and Secretary of State for Scotland (May 2006 to June 2007), Minister of State for Europe (May 2005 to May 2006), Minister for Trade, Investment and Foreign Affairs (September 2004 to April 2005) and Minister for e-Commerce and Competitiveness at the Department for Trade and Industry (June 2001). In May 2002 he moved to the Cabinet Office, becoming Minister for the Cabinet Office in June 2003 where, among other things, he led on the Government's better regulation agenda, public and civil service reform and e-government.

photograph of Robin BurgessRobin Burgess| is Professor of Economics at LSE and Co-Director of the International Growth Centre. He is also Programme Director of the Development Economics Program at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), a member of the Board of Directors of the Bureau for Research in the Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD), a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau for Economic Research (NBER), and a Fellow of the European Development Research Development Network (EUDN). His areas of research interest include development economics, public economics, political economy, labour economics and environmental economics. He has published on a variety of topics - natural disasters, mass media, rural banks, land reform, labour regulation, industrial policy, taxation, poverty and growth.

Paul Collier is Professor of Economics at Oxford University and Co-Director of the International Growth Centre. He is also Director of the Oxford Centre for the Study of African Economies, a Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and has acted as the senior advisor to Tony Blair's Commission on Africa, and was Director of the Development Research group at the World Bank for five years. His areas of research interest include the causes and consequences of civil war; the effects of aid; external shocks, exchange rate and trade policies; economic growth in Africa; and the problems of democracy in low-income and natural-resource-rich societies.

Gobind Nankani, a Ghanaian native, was recently appointed President of the Global Development Network (GDN) in 2007. He is a development economist and had a distinguished 30 year career at the World Bank, holding management positions in various regions and sectors across the Bank. Prior to joining GDN he served as the Vice President for the Africa region between 2004 and 2006. In this position, he was responsible for the overall strategy and management of the Bank's program of financial knowledge and client relationships with all 47 Sub-Saharan African countries. He was also responsible for the overall design and implementation of the World Bank's Africa Action Plan.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


October 2008

LSE Public Lecture: "China and Financial Reform"

Date: Wednesday 15 October 2008
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Howard Davies
Chair: Professor Danny Quah|

photograph of Howard DaviesThis event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

For further information please go to LSE Public Lecture| pages.


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