Lectures and Events

September 2016

Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "The Productivity Puzzle"

Date: Tuesday 27 September 2016
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Andrew G Haldane

photograph of Andrew HaldaneProductivity growth has weakened across a number of economies over recent years, particularly in the UK. Does this reflect a slowing of innovation? Or a slowing in the rate at which this technology is diffused to companies? And, having answered that, what role can public policy play in supporting productivity growth in the period ahead?

Andrew G Haldane is the Chief Economist at the Bank of England and Executive Director, Monetary Analysis and Statistics. He is a member of the Bank’s Monetary Policy Committee. He also has responsibility for research and statistics across the Bank.  In 2014, TIME magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Andrew has written extensively on domestic and international monetary and financial policy issues.  He is co-founder of ‘Pro Bono Economics’, a charity which brokers economists into charitable projects.

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHaldane

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested. 

For further information about the lecture and ticketing please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

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Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "The Wealth of Humans: Work, Power and Status in the Twenty-First Century"

Date: Monday 26 September 2016
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Ryan Avent

photograph of Ryan AventIn his new book, The Wealth of Humans: Work, Power, and Status in the Twenty-First Century, which he will discuss in this talk, Ryan Avent addresses the difficult questions about the increasing abundance of labour and what this means politically, economically and socially for every one of us. The traditional solutions – improved education, wage subsidies, universal basic income – will no longer work as they once did. In order to navigate our way across today’s rapidly transforming economic landscape, Avent argues that we must radically reassess the very idea of how, and why, we work.

Ryan Avent (@ryanavent) is a Senior Editor and Economics Columnist for The Economist, where he has covered the global economy since 2007. His work has appeared in the Guardian, New York Times, the Washington Post, the New Republic and the Atlantic

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEwealth

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

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June 2016

Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "The Hidden Wealth of Nations"

Date: Thursday 30 June 2016
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker: Dr Gabriel Zucman                             

photograph of Gabriel ZucmanThe Hidden Wealth of NationsThis lecture will discuss how big the wealth hidden in offshore tax havens is, what are the consequences for inequality, how tax havens work and are organized, and how we can begin to approach a solution.            

Gabriel Zucman is Assistant Professor of Economics at the Department of Economics at LSE and at UC Berkeley. He's the author of The Hidden Wealth of Nations: The Scourge of Tax Havens.          

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEwealth            

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. 

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

The video and audio recordings of the lecture are available via the LSE News and Media pages and via the Department of Economics YouTube channel. The slides of the lecture are also available.

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May 2016

2016 Economica-Coase Lecture: "Taxes, Targets, and the Social Cost of Carbon"

Date: Thursday 12 May 2016
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker:  Professor Robert Pindyck
Chair: Professor Ian Martin

photograph of Robert PindyckProfessor Pindyck, one of the world’s leading microeconomists, will discuss his recent work, which focuses on economic policies relating to rare disasters.

Robert Pindyck is an American economist, Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi Professor of Economics and Finance at Sloan School of Management at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also a Research Associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received bachelor degrees in Electrical Engineering and Physics from MIT. in 1966, a master's degree in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1967, and a PhD in Economics from MIT in 1971.

Ian Martin is a Professor of Finance at the LSE. He received his PhD in Economics from Harvard University. Before moving to LSE, he was an Associate Professor of Finance at Stanford GSB. His research interests include cross-country contagion in financial markets; the valuation of long-dated assets; catastrophes; derivative pricing; and forecasting in financial markets. Professor Martin is the Programme Director of the
LSE's MSc in Finance and Economics, and is an editor of Economica

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECoase          

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. 

The audio and video recordings of the lecture are now available on the LSE News and Media pages and via the Department of Economics YouTube channel.

You can view the lecture slides: "Taxes, targets, and the social cost of carbon".

See the Image Gallery for photographs of the lecture. 

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

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Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "The Rise and Fall of American Growth"

Date: Wednesday 11 May 2016
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker:  Professor Robert J Gordon
Chair:  Professor Wouter Den Haan

photograph of Robert GordonProfessor Gordon will examine the history of economic growth in the USA, and explore solutions needed to overcome the economic challenges of the future.            

Robert J Gordon is the Stanley G Harris Professor in the Social Sciences at Northwestern University and author of The Rise and Fall of American Growth: The U.S. Standard of Living since the Civil War. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2014 he was elected as a Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association in recognition of a long career of outstanding contributions to scholarship, teaching, public service, and the economics profession. For more than three decades, he has been a member of the National Bureau of Economic Research's Business Cycle Dating Committee, which determines the start and end dates for recessions in the United States.            

Wouter Den Haan is Professor of Economics at LSE and Co-Director of the Centre for Macroeconomics.            

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEAmerica            

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. 

The audio and video recordings of the lecture are now available via the LSE News and Media pages and via the Department of Economics YouTube channel.

For further information, please visi the LSE Public Events pages.

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April 2016

2016 Economica-Phillips Lecture: "Understanding the Stagnation of Modern Economies" 

Date: Thursday 28 April 2016
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker:  Professor Robert Hall
Chair: Professor Francesco Caselli

The annual Phillips Lecture, jointly sponsored by the journal Economica and the Department of Economics, in which Professor Hall, one of the world's leading macroeconomists will speak on the macroeconomics of persistent slumps.    

photograph of Robert HallRobert Hall is an American economist and a Robert and Carole McNeil Senior Fellow at Hoover Institution and Professor of Economics at Standford University. He is generally considered a macroeconomist, but he describes himself as an "applied economist".

Bob Hall received a BA in Economics at the University of California, Berkeley and a PhD in Economics from MIT for thesis titled Essays on the Theory of Wealth under the supervision of Robert Solow. He is a member of the Hoover Institution, the National Academy of Sciences, a fellow at both American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society, and a member of the NBER, where he is the program director of the business cycle dating committee. Hall served as President of the American Economic Association in 2010.

Francesco Caselli is the Norman Sosnow Chair in Economics at the Department of Economics at LSE.

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPhillips

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. 

The audio and video recordings of the lecture are now available on the LSE News and Media pages and via the Department of Economics YouTube channel

See the Image Gallery for photographs of the lecture. 

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

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March 2016

Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "Clear and Present Challenges to the Chinese Economy"

Date: Wednesday 9 March 2016
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker:  Dr Keyu Jin

photograph of Keyu Jin

Dr Keyu Jin will discuss the impact of China’s financial reforms.          

Keyu Jin (@KeyuJin) is a Lecturer in the Department of Economics and a member of the Centre for Macroeconomics and Centre for Economic Performance.            

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEChina

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. 

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages. 

The audio and video recordings of the lecture are now available via the LSE News and Media pages and via the Department of Economics YouTube channel. The slides of the lecture are also available online.

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Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "The End of Alchemy"

Date: Tuesday 1 March 2016
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: LSE campus, venue TBC to ticketholders
Speaker:  Professor Lord King
Chair: Professor Lord Stern

TheEndOfAlchemyProfessor Lord King will discuss with Professor Lord Stern his new book, The End of Alchemy: Banking, the Global Economy and the Future of Money, which suggests original ways to end the alchemy of our current monetary and banking system and to correct the disequilibrium in the world economy today.            

photograph of Mervyn KingMervyn King was Governor of the Bank of England from 2003 to 2013, and is currently Professor of Economics and Law at New York University and School Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Lord King was made a life peer in 2013, and appointed by the Queen a Knight of the Garter in 2014.            

Nicholas Stern is the IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government and Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. He is President of the British Academy since 2013, and a Fellow of the Royal Society since 2014. He was Second Permanent Secretary to Her Majesty’s Treasury from 2003-2005; and Head of the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change, published in 2006. He has published more than 15 books and 100 articles, his most recent book is Why are We Waiting? The Logic, Urgency and Promise of Tackling Climate Change.

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEKing

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested.            

LSE students and staff are able to collect one ticket per person from the SU shop, located on Lincolns Chambers, 2-4 Portsmouth Street from 10am on Monday 22 February. These tickets are available on a first come, first serve basis.            

Members of the public, LSE alumni, LSE students and LSE staff can request one ticket via the online ticket request form which will be live on this listing from around 6pm on Monday 22 February until at least 12noon on Tuesday 23 February.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

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February 2016

Department of Economics Inaugural Lecture: "Political Economy and Development: a Progress Report"

Date: Wednesday 10 February 2016
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker:  Professor Tim Besley
Chair: Professor Oriana Bandiera

photograph of Tim BesleyA major change in mainstream thinking in economics over the past 25 years has been towards improving our understanding of how the policy process (political and bureaucrat) affects policy outcomes.  Such changes in economic thinking are partly in response to the need to have a persuasive account of the diverse historical development experiences of various countries and regions.  One key debate following this research has been about whether a particular configuration of institutions is needed to promote inclusive economic development.  This lecture will take stock of what has been learned and critically appraise the state of knowledge, drawing some implications for how International Financial Institutions and Aid Practitioners approach their business. 

Professor Tim Besley gives his inaugural lecture as Sir William Arthur Lewis Chair in Development Economics.                   

The William Arthur Lewis Chair, created by LSE to mark the centenary of the Nobel Prize winner’s birth, was formally announced at LSE’s Sir Arthur Lewis Centenary Event on Understanding Economic Development on Monday 22 June.

Tim Besley is Deputy Head for Research of the Department of Economics and an associate member of CEP, IGC and STICERD at LSE.

Oriana Bandiera is Professor of Economics and Director of STICERD at LSE.

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELewis            

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries see LSE Events FAQ or contact us at events@lse.ac.uk or 0207 955 6043.        

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.    

Tim Besley's speech is available online. The video and audio recordings of the lecture is now available via the LSE News and Media pages and via the Department of Economics YouTube channel.

Photographs from the event are available in the Department of Economics Image Galleries page.

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January 2016

Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "Debt, Demographics and the Distribution of Income: New Challenges for Monetary Policy"

Date: Monday 18 January 2016
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Dr Gertjan Vlieghe

photograph of Gertjan Vlieghe

Dr Gertjan Vlieghe (pictured, Bank of England CC-BY-NC-ND-2.0) joined the Monetary Policy Committee of the Bank of England on 1 September 2015.             

Prior to his appointment he had been a partner and senior economist at Brevan Howard Asset Management, researching global macroeconomic trends and their interaction with asset prices. From 2005 to 2007 he was a bond strategist at Deutsche Bank. From 1998 to 2005 he held a number of posts at the Bank of England, including the post of Economic Assistant to Governor Mervyn King. Dr Vlieghe's published research has largely focused on the importance of money, balance sheets and asset prices in the economy. He holds a doctorate from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEVlieghe            

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries see LSE Events FAQ or contact us at events@lse.ac.uk or 0207 955 6043.            

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

Gertjan Vlieghe's speech is available via the Bank of England' s website. The audio recording of the lecture is now available via the LSE News and Media pages.

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Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "Economics of Migration"

Date: Tuesday 12 January 2016
Time:  6.30-8pm
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker: Professor Alan Manning
Chair: Professor Wouter Den Haan 

photograph of Alan ManningImmigration is currently the most common response when asked about the most important issues facing Britain. This lecture will explain why there is a demand for immigration into the UK, and what the effects of it has been.            

Alan Manning is Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science and is Director of the Centre for Economic Performance’s research programme on Community.            

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEecon            

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries see LSE Events FAQ or contact us at events@lse.ac.uk or 0207 955 6043.            

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

The video and audio recordings of the lecture are now available via the LSE News and Media pages and the Department of Economics YouTube channel. The slides of the lecture are also available.

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November 2015

Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "Debt and Austerity: post-crisis lessons from Ireland"

Date: Tuesday 17 November 2015
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue:  Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Patrick Honohan
Chair: Professor Sir Charles Bean

photograph of Patrick HonohanAfter a long run of seeming prosperity, the financial crisis left Ireland’s banks more under water and its public and private balance sheets in greater disarray than in most other Western European countries. Since then, the painful processes of bank restructuring and fiscal adjustment, partly under the protection of an IMF-EU financial support arrangement, have revealed much about the domestic and international political economy of debt and austerity.  

Patrick Honohan (pictured left: ECB Forum on Central Banking CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) was appointed Governor of the Central Bank of Ireland in 2009. Prior to this, he worked at the World Bank and the IMF, and was economics advisor to the Irish government. He is an alumnus of LSE and the Department of Economics - he completed an MSc in Econometrics and Mathematical Economics and a PhD in Economics here. His PhD thesis was 'Uncertainty, Portfolio Choice and Economic Fluctuations', supervised by Michio Morishima.

Sir Charles Bean is Professor of Economics at the Department of Economics at LSE, and member of the Centre for Macroeconomics. He was Deputy Governor for Monetary Policy at the Bank of England from 2008-14, and Chief Economist at the Bank of England from 2000 to 2008. 

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEecon

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries see LSE Events FAQ or contact us at events@lse.ac.uk or 0207 955 6043.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

Patrick Honohan's speech and lecture slides are available via the Central Bank of Ireland's website. The audio and video recordings as well as the the transcript are available via the LSE News and Media pages. The video is also available via the Department of Economics YouTube channel.

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Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "GDP: a brief but affectionate history"

Date: Monday 16 November 2015
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker:  Professor Diane Coyle
Chair: Professor Francesco Caselli

photograph of Diane Coyle Why did the size of the U.S. economy increase by 3 percent on one day in mid-2013 - or Ghana’s balloon by 60 percent overnight in 2010? Why did the U.K. financial industry show its fastest expansion ever at the end of 2008 - just as the world’s financial system went into meltdown? And why was Greece’s chief statistician charged with treason in 2013 for apparently doing nothing more than trying to accurately report the size of his country’s economy? The answers to all these questions lie in the way we define and measure national economies around the world: gross domestic product.

GDPDiane Coyle (pictured left, copyright: Jason Wen CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) (@diane1859) is professor of economics at the University of Manchester. She runs the consultancy Enlightenment Economics, and as well as a regular blog, she is the author of numerous books, including The Economics of Enough and The Soulful Science: What Economists Really Do and Why It Matters. Her latest book is GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History.

Professor Francesco Caselli is Norman Sosnow Professor of Economics at the Department of Economics and Programme Leader at the Centre for Macroeconomics.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEGDP

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries see LSE Events FAQ or contact us at events@lse.ac.uk or 0207 955 6043.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

The video and audio recordings of the lecture are now available via the LSE News and Media pages and the Department of Economics YouTube channel.

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Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "Phising for Phools: the economics of manipulation and deception"

Date: Wednesday 11 November  2015
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue:  Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Robert J. Shiller 
Chair: Professor Wouter Den Haan

photograph of Robert J ShillerEver since Adam Smith, the central teaching of economics has been that free markets provide us with material well-being, as if by an invisible hand.  Robert Shiller delivers a fundamental challenge to this insight, arguing that markets harm as well as help us. As long as there is profit to be made, sellers will systematically exploit our psychological weaknesses and our ignorance through manipulation and deception. Rather than being essentially benign and always creating the greater good, markets are inherently filled with tricks and traps and will “phish” us as “phools.” 

This represents a radically new direction in economics, based on the intuitive idea that markets both give and take away. We spend our money up to the limit, and then worry about how to pay the next month’s bills. The financial system soars, then crashes. We are attracted, more than we know, by advertising. Our political system is distorted by money. We pay too much for gym memberships, cars, houses, and credit cards. Drug companies ingeniously market pharmaceuticals that do us little good, and sometimes are downright dangerous. Phishing for Phools explores the central role of manipulation and deception in each of these areas and many more. It thereby explains a paradox: why, at a time when we are better off than ever before in history, all too many of us are leading lives of quiet desperation.

Robert J Shiller (@RobertJShiller), the recipient of the 2013 Nobel Prize in economics, is a best-selling author, a regular contributor to the Economic View column of the New York Times, and a professor of economics at Yale University. His books include Finance and the Good Society, Animal Spirits (co-written with George A. Akerlof), The Subprime SolutionThe New Financial Order and Irrational Exuberance. 

Wouter Den Haan is Professor of Economics at LSE and Co-Director of the Centre for Macroeconomics.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEecon

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested.

LSE students and staff are able to collect one ticket per person from the SU shop, located on Lincolns Chambers, 2-4 Portsmouth Street from 10am on Wednesday 4 November. These tickets are available on a first come, first serve basis.

Members of the public, LSE alumni, LSE students and LSE staff can request one ticket via the online ticket request form which will be live on this listing from around 6pm on Wednesday 4 November until at least 12noon on Thursday 5 November.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

The video and audio recordings of the lecture are now available via the LSE News and Media pages and the Department of Economics YouTube channel.

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October 2015

Department of Economics and LSE US Centre Public Conversation: "A Conversation with Ben Bernanke"

Date: Wednesday 28 October  2015
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: LSE campus, venue tbc to ticketholders
Speaker: Dr Ben S. Bernanke
Chair: Professor Erik Bergof

photograph of Ben BernankeBen Bernanke will discuss his new book, The Courage to Act: A Memoir of a Crisis and its Aftermath, and his time as chair of the US Federal Reserve.

Ben S. Bernanke (@benbernanke) is a Distinguished Fellow in Residence with the Economic Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. From February 2006 through January 2014, he was Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Dr. Bernanke also served as Chairman of the Federal Open Market Committee, the System's principal monetary policymaking body.

Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is Director of the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) at LSE.        

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEBernanke 

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested.

LSE students and staff are able to collect one ticket per person from the SU shop, located on Lincolns Chambers, 2-4 Portsmouth Street from 10am on Wednesday 21 October. These tickets are available on a first come, first serve basis.

Members of the public, LSE alumni, LSE students and LSE staff can request one ticket via the online ticket request form which will be live on this listing from around 6pm on Wednesday 21 October until at least 12noon on Thursday 22 October.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

For an overview of the conversation, please visit the LSE US Centre's Storify page.

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Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "Other People's Money"

Date: Tuesday 20 October 2015
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue:  Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor John Kay
Chair: Professor Wouter Den Haan 

Modern economies need finance, to enable us to make payments, transfer wealth across our lifetimes and between generations, allocate capital and maintain the corporate and physical infrastructure, and to help us manage the risks of everyday life.  Instead, we have created a financial world that talks to itself, trades with itself, and is increasingly divorced from the activities of the real economy. John Kay explains how this came about – and what can be done to recreate a financial sector responsive to economic and social needs.

photograph of John KayJohn Kay (@JohnKayFT) is an economist whose career has spanned the academic world, business and public affairs. Currently, he is a visiting Professor of Economics at LSE and a Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. He is a director of several public companies and contributes a weekly column to the Financial Times. He recently chaired the Review of UK Equity Markets and Long-Term Decision-Making which reported to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills in July 2012. He is the author of many books, including The Truth about Markets (2003), The Long and the Short of It: finance and investment for normally intelligent people who are not in the industry (2009) and Obliquity (2010). His latest book is Other People’s Money.

Wouter Den Haan is Professor of Economics and Co-Director of the Centre for Macroeconomics.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEecon

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries see LSE Events FAQ or contact us at events@lse.ac.uk or 0207 955 6043.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events page.

The video and audio recordings of the lecture are now available via the LSE News and Media pages and the Department of Economics YouTube channel.

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Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "Economics Rules: the rights and wrongs of the dismal science"

Date: Wednesday 7 October 2015
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue:  Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Dani Rodrik
Chair: Professor Wouter Den Haan 

BEconomics Rulesased on his new book, Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science, Professor Rodrik will give an accessible introduction to the strengths of the discipline of economics and why it is so often misunderstood, not least by its practitioners.

photograph of Dani RodrikDani Rodrik (@rodrikdani) is Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy at the John F Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University and Centennial Professor at the LSE European Institute and Department of Economics. He has published widely in international economics and globalization, economic growth and development, and political economy. He is the author of The Globalization Paradox (Norton, 2011) and One Economics, Many Recipes (Princeton, 2007). 

Wouter Den Haan is Professor of Economics and Co-Director of the Centre for Macroeconomics.  

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEecon

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries see LSE Events FAQ or contact us at events@lse.ac.uk or 0207 955 6043.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events pages.

The video and audio recordings of the lecture are now available via the LSE News and Media pages and the Department of Economics YouTube channel.

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Lectures and Events Archive

Click on the Lectures and Events Archive to find out about the lectures and events that took place in previous years.

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