Lectures and Events

March 2014

Department of Economics, STICERD and LSE Asia Research Centre Public Lecture: "Why Abenomics Matters: Abenomics and the Japanese Economy"

Date: Tuesday 25 March 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker: Professor Motoshige Itoh
Chair: Professor Oriana Bandiera|

Japan is highly unusual in having experienced serious deflation in recent years, and Japan's experience may be regarded as providing a good case study for other industrial countries suffering from inadequate capital investment and what has been termed 'secular stagnation'. This lecture explains the nature of the 'Abenomics' introduced by Japan's Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, since taking office in December 2012, discussing in particular the impact of aggressive monetary policy and the implications of its growth strategy. The lecture will also touch on issues on fiscal consolidation and social security reform in Japan, which is the most rapidly ageing society in the world.

photograph of Motoshige ItohProfessor Motoshige Itoh (pictured) is a Professor of the Graduate School of Economics, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo. He is the President of the National Institute for Research Advancement, and a member of the Council on Economic and Fiscal Policy. A graduate of the University of Tokyo, his academic field of specialisation is International Economics. Professor Itoh is closely involved in policy decision-making processes in the Japanese government and writes several columns for newspapers and magazines.

Professor Oriana Bandiera is Director of STICERD and Professor of Economics at LSE.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on  a first come, first served basis. 

For any queries email arc@lse.ac.uk|  or call 020 7955 7615.

If you are planning to attend this event and would like details on how to get here and what time to arrive, please refer to Coming to an event at LSE|.


2014 Economica Phillips Lecture: "Environmental Protection and Rare Disasters"

Date: Thursday 20 March 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker:  Professor Robert J Barro
Chair: Professor Sir Christopher Pissarides|

photograph of Robert J BarroDrawing on work on rare macroeconomic disasters, this lecture will argue that optimal environmental investment can be a significant share of GDP even with standard values for the rate of time preference and the expected rate of return on private capital. 

Drawing on work on rare macroeconomic disasters, this lecture will argue that optimal environmental investment can be a significant share of GDP even with standard values for the rate of time preference and the expected rate of return on private capital.

The Stern Review’s evaluation of environmental protection relies on extremely low discount rates, an assumption criticized by many economists. The Review also stresses that great uncertainty is a critical element for optimal environmental policies. An appropriate model for this policy analysis requires sufficient risk aversion and fat-tailed uncertainty to get into the ballpark of explaining the observed equity premium. A satisfactory framework, based on Epstein-Zin/Weil preferences, also separates the coefficient of relative risk aversion (important for results on environmental investment) from the intertemporal elasticity of substitution for consumption (which matters little). Calibrations based on existing models of rare macroeconomic disasters suggest that optimal environmental investment can be a significant share of GDP even with reasonable values for the rate of time preference and the expected rate of return on private capital. Optimal environmental investment increases with the coefficient of relative risk aversion and the probability and typical size of environmental disasters but decreases with the degree of uncertainty about policy effectiveness.  The key parameters that need to be pinned down are the proportionate effect of environmental investment on the probability of environmental disaster and the baseline probability of environmental disaster.

Robert J Barro (pictured) is Paul M Warburg Professor of Economics at Harvard University and a senior fellow of the Hoover Institution of Stanford University.

The annual Coase-Phillips Lectures| are hosted jointly by the journal Economica and the Department of Economics.  Past speakers include Elhanan Helpman, Chris Pissarides, Ernst Fehr, Thomas Sargent, Jean Tirole and Robert Lucas.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEBarro.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

This event will be webcast live on the LSE website on LSE Live|.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| page.  


In Conversation with Daniel Finkelstein

Date: Thursday 20 March 2014 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: The Venue, Saw Swee Hock Student Centre
Speaker: Daniel Finkelstein

photograph of the Saw See Hock Student Centre|To mark the completion of the Saw Swee Hock Student Centre, the first brand new building on campus for more than 40 years, the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and the LSE Students’ Union| have organised a series of ‘in conversation’| events with some of the School's distinguished alumni. These events will take place in the Saw Swee Hock Student Centre and will be open to LSE students, alumni and staff.   

This event will see Daniel Finkelstein in conversation with Jay Stoll. 

Daniel Finkelstein, an alumnus of the Economics Department, is a weekly columnist, leader writer and associate editor of The Times.

Before joining the paper in 2001, he was adviser to both Prime Minister John Major and Conservative leader William Hague. Daniel was named Political Commentator of the Year at the Editorial Intelligence Comment Awards 2010, 2011 and 2013. He graduated from LSE with a BSc in Economics. 

Jay Stoll is the general secretary of the LSE Students' Union, the primary representative of LSE students to the university, the media and the wider world. He graduated from LSE in 2013 with a BSc in International Relations and History.  

After the conversation there will be the opportunity for the audience to put their questions to the speaker in the Q&A session. A free drinks reception will follow the event giving the audience a chance to meet the speaker.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSESawSwee

This event is open to LSE students, staff and alumni however a ticket is required. Tickets will be available to request after 6pm on Wednesday 12 March until at least 12noon on Thursday 13 March.

Further information can be found in the LSE Public Events| pages.


Centre for Macroeconomics and Department of Economics Lecture Series: "Is Everything You Hear About Macroeconomics True?"

Date: Wednesday 19 March 2014 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker:  Professor Wouter Den Haan|  

photograph of Wouter Den HaanThis lecture looks at the real and perceived weaknesses, strengths and challenges of modern macroeconomics.

Wouter Den Haan is Professor of Economics and Co-director of the Centre for Macroeconomics at LSE. 

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEmacro  

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

Further information is available from the LSE Public Events| pages.


Department of Economics Public Discussion: "Tragedy of the European Union: Disintegration or Revival?: How Europe must now choose between economic and political revival or disintegration"

Date: Thursday 13 March 2014
Time: 2:00-3:30pm
Venue: LSE campus, venue tbc to ticketholders
Speaker: George Soros
Discussants: Professor Mary Kaldor, Anatole Kaletsky
Chair: Professor Craig Calhoun

This event marks the publication of George Soros' new book, Tragedy of the European Union: Disintegration or Revival?: How Europe Must Now Choose Between Economic and Political Revival or Disintegration| in which he reveals the roots of Europe's current financial crisis and comprehensively assesses the consequences of that crisis for the global economy and on the political ideals embodied by the European Union. In this concise and illuminating volume, renowned financier George Soros examines both the political and economic fault-lines of the European Union to reveal the roots Europe's current financial crisis. Interwoven with aspects from George Soros' personal life, The Fate of the Union narrates the history of the European Union in order to assess the current crisis and its effects on Europe's role in the global economy. Will the Euro survive? George Soros identifies the true culprits of the Eurozone crisis - among them a misbegotten German austerity programme - and diagnoses what we must do to rescue the ideals of the European project.

photograph of George SorosGeorge Soros (@georgesoros|) is the chairman of Soros Fund Management and the founder the Open Societies Institute, a global network of foundations dedicated to supporting open societies. He is the author of several best-selling books including The New Paradigm for Financial Markets: The Crash of 2008 and What It Means, The Bubble of American Supremacy and The Age of Fallibility. He was born in Budapest and lives in New York City. Soros was born in Budapest in 1930. He survived the Nazi occupation and fled communist Hungary in 1947 for England, where he graduated from the London School of Economics and Political Science. He then settled in the United States, where he accumulated a large fortune through an international investment fund he founded and managed. Mr Soros has been active as a philanthropist since 1979, when he began providing funds to help black students attend Capetown University in apartheid South Africa. He has established a network of philanthropic organisations active in more than 50 countries around the world. These organisations are dedicated to promoting the values of democracy and an open society.

Mary Kaldor is professor of Global Governance and director of the Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit at the London School of Economics. She is the author of many books, including The Ultimate Weapon is No Weapon: Human Security and the Changing Rules of War and Peace, New and Old Wars: Organised Violence in a Global Era and Global Civil Society: An Answer to War. Professor Kaldor was a founding member of the European Nuclear Disarmament and of the Helsinki Citizen's Assembly. She is also convenor of the Human Security Study Group, which reported to Javier Solana, and now Cathy Ashton.

Anatole Kaletsky is an award-winning journalist and financial economist who has written since 1976 for The Economist, the Financial Times and The Times of London before joining Reuters. His recent book, Capitalism 4.0, about the reinvention of global capitalism after the 2008 crisis, was nominated for the BBC’s Samuel Johnson Prize, and has been translated into Chinese, Korean, German and Portuguese. Anatole is also chief economist of GaveKal Dragonomics, a Hong Kong-based group that provides investment analysis to 800 investment institutions around the world.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSESoros

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested.

The event will be streamed live on the LSE Live| website.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages. 

The video and audio recordings are now available on the LSE News and Media| pages and on the Department of Economics YouTube channel|.


In Conversation with Bronwyn Curtis

Date: Monday 3 March 2014 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: The Venue, Saw Swee Hock Student Centre
Speaker:  Bronwyn Curtis

photograph of the Saw See Hock Student CentreTo mark the completion of the Saw Swee Hock Student Centre|, the first brand new building on campus for more than 40 years, the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and the LSE Students’ Union| have organised a series of ‘in conversation’| events with some of the School's distinguished alumni. These events will take place in the Saw Swee Hock Student Centre and will be open to LSE students, alumni and staff.

This event will see Bronwyn Curtis in conversation with Professor Danny Quah. 

 Bronwyn Curtis is an economist whose career spans both the financial markets and the media. She is a widely published author and a regular speaker on television and radio. Most recently she was Head of Global Research at HSBC. Previously she was at Bloomberg where she was managing editor and responsible for all European broadcasting activities. Other roles include Global Head of Currency and Fixed Income Strategy at Deutsche Bank and Chief Economist at Nomura International. She has also worked as a consultant for the World Bank and UNCTAD on projects in West Africa, Asia and the Caribbean.

Bronwyn is a non-executive director of JPM Asian Investment Trust PLC, Vice Chairman of the Society of Business Economists, a board member of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, a former member of the Council at the London School of Economics. She is also on the Advisory Board at Imperial College Business School, as well as a member of The Times newspaper’s Shadow Monetary Policy Committee. She has also been a Board member of the Office of Fair Trading. She has a master's degree from the London School of Economics, and is an economics graduate of La Trobe University, Australia. Bronwyn was awarded an OBE for services to business economics in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list in 2008.

Danny Quah| is professor of economics and international development, and Kuwait Professor at LSE. He previously served as LSE’s Head of Department for Economics (2006-2009) and Council Member on Malaysia’s National Economic Advisory Council (2009-2011). He is Tan Chin Tuan Visiting Professor at the National University of Singapore, and lectures regularly at Peking University. He studied at Princeton, Minnesota, and Harvard, and was Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at MIT before joining LSE.

After the conversation there will be the opportunity for the audience to put their questions to the speaker in the Q&A session. A free drinks reception will follow the event giving the audience a chance to meet the speaker.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSESawSwee

This event is open to LSE students, staff and alumni however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested. Tickets will be available to request from 6pm on Monday 24 February until at least 12noon on Tuesday 25 February.

Please visit the LSE Public Events| page for further information.

The podcast of this event is now available via the LSE Public Events| pages.


February 2014

Centre for Macroeconomics and Department of Economics Lecture Series: "Fiscal Policy During Recessions and Recoveries"

Date: Wednesday 26 February 2014 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker:  Dr Ethan Ilzetzki|
Chair: Professor Wouter Den Haan|  

photograph of Ethan IlzetzkiThis talk discusses what is known about the effects of austerity and fiscal stimulus on economic activity.

Ethan Ilzetzki is an economics lecturer at LSE. His research focuses on the effects of fiscal policy and the role of politics in shaping fiscal policy.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEmacro

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 6043.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| page.

The video and audio recordings are now available on the LSE News and Media| pages and on the Department of Economics YouTube channel|.


Department of Economics Public Discussion: "Should the Euro Survive? Economics in an Era of Political Extremism"

Date: Thursday 6 February 2014 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speakers: Paul Donovan, George Magnus  

photograph of George MagnusCome along to an economics debate to help you consider what will happen next in Europe.

Paul Donovan is managing director of global economics at UBS.

George Magnus (pictured left) is senior economic advisor at UBS.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEEuro

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| page.

The video and audio recordings are now available on the LSE News and Media| pages and on the Department of Economics YouTube channel|.


January 2014

Centre for Macroeconomics and Department of Economics Lecture Series: "China's Role in the Global Economy: Myths and Realities"

Date: Wednesday 29 January 2014 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker:  Dr Keyu Jin|
Chair:  Professor Wouter Den Haan|

photograph of Keyu JinThe CFM and Department of Economics lecture series focuses on topical macroeconomic questions. Its aim is to give an informative and balanced overview of available knowledge among macroeconomists. This talk considers China’s growing role in the world economy.

Keyu Jin is a lecturer at LSE. Her research has focused on global imbalances and global asset prices, as well as international trade and growth.

Wouter Den Haan is professor of economics and co-director of the Centre for Macroeconomics at LSE.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEmacro

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 6043.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| page.

The video and audio recordings are now available on the LSE News and Media| pages and on the Department of Economics YouTube channel|.


Gender Institute and Department of Economics Public Lecture: "The Reproduction of People by Means of People"

Date: Wednesday 15 January 2014 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker:  Professor Nancy Folbre|
Chair:  Professor Gilat Levy|

Current understandings and analyses of the economy represent a partial picture. To provide a comprehensive understanding of the economy it is crucial to recognize that, firstly, the measurement of living standards should be expanded to include consideration of both the costs and benefits of unpaid work and intra-family transfers. Secondly, macroeconomic theory should acknowledge and measure the value of unpaid work as a dimension of output and expand its definitions of investment and consumption. Thirdly, public finance should focus more explicitly on both private and public intergenerational transfers.

This lecture applies a feminist perspective on the definition of output, income, and living standards to an alternative framework for national income accounting and budget analysis. This framework disaggregates flows of money and time devoted to the care of children, other dependents, the maintenance of adult capabilities, the development of adult capabilities, and luxury consumption over the lifecycle. By so doing it is possible to recognize the significance of all the work, both paid and unpaid, that contributes to national income.

photograph of Nancy FolbreNancy Folbre is emeritus professor of economics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her research explores the interface between political economy and feminist theory, with a particular emphasis on the value of unpaid care work.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEpeople

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 6043.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| page.

The podcast of the lecture is now available from the LSE News and Media| pages.


December 2013

LSE Regius Professorship Inaugural Lecture: "Is Europe Working?"

Date: Thursday 12 December 2013 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker:  Professor Sir Christopher Pissarides|
Chair:  Professor Stuart Corbridge

The government announced earlier this year that LSE will be one of 12 universities to have the prestigious title of Regius Professor bestowed upon it by The Queen to mark the Diamond Jubilee, with the creation of a new Regius Professor in Economics. A Regius Professorship| is a rare privilege, with only two created in the past century; it is regarded as a reflection of the exceptionally high quality of teaching and research at an institution. It is the first Regius Professorship to have been awarded in the field of economics.  

photograph of Chris Pissarides

Christopher Pissarides has been appointed as Regius Professor at LSE. In 2010 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his work with Peter Diamond and Dale Mortensen on the analysis of markets with search frictions.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSERegius

The live webcast of this event will be broadcast at LSE Live|.

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested. Members of the public, LSE staff, students and alumni can request one ticket via the online ticket request form which will be live on this listing from around 6pm on Thursday 5 December until at least 12noon on Friday 6 December.

LSE students and staff are also able to collect one ticket per person from the New Academic Building SU shop, located on the Kingsway side of the building from 10am on 6 December.    

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.

The video and audio recordings are now available on the LSE News and Media| pages and on the Department of Economics YouTube channel|.

Photographs from the event are available in the Department of Economics Image Galleries| page.


November 2013

Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "The Body Economic: Why Austerity Kills"

Date: Wednesday 27 November 2013 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker:  Dr David Stuckler
Chair: Professor Silvana Tenreyro|  

photograph of David StucklerThe Body Economic| puts forward a radical proposition. Austerity, it argues, is seriously bad for your health. We can prevent financial crises from becoming epidemics, but to do so, we must acknowledge what the hard data tells us: that, throughout history, there is a causal link between the strength of a community's health and its social protection systems. Now and for generations to come, our commitment to the building of fairer, more equal societies will determine the health of our body economic.  

David Stuckler is an expert on the economics of global health, and a Senior Research Leader in Sociology at the University of Oxford. He is co-author with Sanjay Basu of The Body Economic

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEausterity 

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 6043. 

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages. 

The video and audio recordings are now available on the LSE News and Media| pages and on the Department of Economics YouTube channel|.


LSESU-UCL Economics Conference

Date: Saturday, 23 November 2013
Time: 9am-5am
Venue: TBC

LSESU-UCL Conference logo

The LSESU-UCL Economics Conference 2013/14 is a special joint project by the LSE Students' Union Economics Society’s Special Projects Division and the UCL Economist's Society with the kind support of the LSE and UCL Economics Departments.

The theme of the Conference is People and Economics, which points to how economics can inform decision-making in many facets of human life that are subtly interlinked with markets. Taking center stage is an open debate about Women and Economics that touches on women in economics and the economics of gender. The Conference is designed to meet the need to address topics of current and significant policy importance not limited to macroeconomics and finance, while drawing attention to women and exposing the human face of economics.

For further information please visit the LSESU-UCL Conference| website.


Department of Economics Public Lecture: "The Chicago Plan Revisited"

Date:  Tuesday 12 November 2013 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker:  Michael Kumhof
Chair: Professor Danny Quah|

photograph of Michael Kumhof|Michael Kumhof will discuss his 2012 paper (which can be downloaded here|) on the Chicago Plan, a radical reform plan for the banking industry that would eliminate banks’ power to create money.

Based on proposals developed by members of the Chicago School in the US in the 1930s, Kumhof’s plan represents the most far-reaching and decisive proposal to eliminate the risks associated with fractional reserve banking. 

Michael Kumhof is deputy division chief of the Modelling Division at the IMF Research Department.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEKumhof

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 6043. 

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages. 

The video and audio recordings are now available on the LSE News and Media| pages and on the Department of Economics YouTube channel|.


October 2013

Department of Economics Public Discussion: "Work as a Value"

Date: Tuesday 29 October 2013 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speakers:  Professor Lord Skidelsky
Discussant:  Lord Glasman
Chair:  Dr Jan-Emmanuel De Neve| 

Why do we work almost as hard as we did 40 years ago, despite being on average twice as rich? Robert Skidelsky suggests an escape from the work and consumption treadmill. This event marks the paperback publication of Robert and Edward Skidelsky's book How Much Is Enough?

Robert Skidelsky is emeritus professor of political economy at the University of Warwick. His three-volume biography of the economist John Maynard Keynes (1983, 1992, 2000) received numerous prizes; he also penned the critically acclaimed Keynes: The Return of the Master. You can read an introduction to his argument here|.

Dr Maurice Glasman is a reader in political theory at London Metropolitan University, author of Unnecessary Suffering and a Labour Peer. His paper, "Politics, Employment and the Young Generation", to which he will refer during the evening, can be downloaded here|.

photograph of Robert Skidelsky           photograph of Maurice Glasman           photograph of Jan-Emmanuel De Neve 
From left to right: Professor Lord Skidelsky, Lord Glasman, Dr Jan-Emmanuel De Neve

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEwork

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested.  

Members of the public, LSE staff, students and alumni can request one ticket via the online ticket request form which will be live on this listing from around 6pm on Tuesday 22 October until at least 12noon on Wednesday 23 October.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.

The podcast is now available on the LSE News and Media| pages and on the Department of Economics YouTube channel|.


LSE Lecture: "The Inextricable Links between Banking and the Economy"

Date: Monday 21 October 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: LSE campus, venue TBC to ticketholders
Speaker:  António Horta‐Osório

Please note that this lecture is open only to LSE staff and students.

photograph of Antonio Horta-OsarioAntónio will set out his views on why the future of the UK economy and the banking industry are inextricably linked. He will explore the mutual interdependency between a healthy economy and a healthy banking industry, and will explain the steps Lloyds Banking Group has taken on its strategic transformation since António joined as Group chief executive in 2011.

António joined the board of Lloyds Banking Group on 17 January 2011 as an executive director and became Group chief executive on 1 March 2011. Previously he was the chief executive of Santander UK plc and executive vice president of Grupo Santander. He was also chairman of Santander Totta until 2011, where he was CEO between 2000‐2006, and prior to that was CEO of Banco Santander Brazil.

António started his career at Citibank Portugal where he was head of Capital Markets. At the same time, he was an assistant professor at Universidade Catolica Portuguesa. He then worked for Goldman Sachs in New York and London. In 1993, he joined Grupo Santander as chief executive of Banco Santander de Negócios Portugal.

A graduate of management and business administration at Universidade Católica Portuguesa, António has a MBA from INSEAD where he was awarded the Henry Ford II prize – and an AMP from Harvard Business School. He was recently awarded Honorary Doctorates from the University of Edinburgh and the University of Bath.

Previously a non executive Director to the Court of the Bank of England, António is currently a non executive of Fundação Champalimaud in Portugal, serves on the CBI President’s Committee and is a governor of the London Business School.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSELloyds

This event is free and open to all LSE staff and students. Valid LSE ID will be required to gain access to the venue.

LSE staff and students can request one ticket via the online ticket request form which will be live on this listing from around 6pm on Monday 14 October until at least 12noon on Tuesday 15 October.

For further information, please visit the LSE Events| pages.


LSE Public Lecture - Oakeshott Memorial Lecture: "Grassroots Innovation and the Spread of Flourishing"

Date: Wednesday 16 October 2013 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker:  Professor Edmund Phelps
Chair:  Professor Craig Calhoun

A handful of nations saw exploding wages, teeming employment and an engaged populace from 1820 to 1940, racing ahead of the others until something put a damper on their dynamism.  What was that something?  And how can these nations get back their mass flourishing?

photograph of Edmund PhelpsEdmund Phelps is the 2006 Nobel Laureate in Economics and the Director of the Center on Capitalism and Society at Columbia University. His career has been devoted to two intertwined aims: to call into question the preconceptions about education, information and knowledge to which mainstream economics has clung, replacing them with the modern notions necessary to describe the successful operations of a modern economy; and to put "people as we know them", with their imperfect knowledge, understanding and expectations, back into economic models. He is the author of several books the most recent of which is Mass Flourishing: how grassroots innovation created jobs, challenge, and change|

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEPhelps

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required. One ticket per person can now be requested. 

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


LSE Health and Social Care Annual Lecture supported by the Department of Social Policy: "The Great Escape: health, wealth, and the origins of inequality"

Date: Tuesday 15 October 2013 
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker:  Professor Angus Deaton
Respondent: Professor Nicholas Stern
Chair:  Professor Alistair McGuire

The world is a better place than it used to be. People are wealthier and healthier, and live longer lives. Yet the escapes from destitution by so many have left gaping inequalities between people and between nations. In this lecture Angus Deaton (one of the foremost experts on economic development and on poverty) tells the remarkable story of how, starting two hundred and fifty years ago, some parts of the world began to experience sustained progress, opening up gaps and setting the stage for today's hugely unequal world. Deaton takes an in-depth look at the historical and ongoing patterns behind the health and wealth of nations, and he addresses what needs to be done to help those left behind.  

Angus Deaton is the Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of Economics and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Economics Department at Princeton University. His many books include The Analysis of Household Surveys| and Economics and Consumer Behavior|. He is a past president of the American Economic Association.

Nicholas Stern is IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, the first holder of this position, at the Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines (STICERD), and chair of the Grantham Research Institute for Climate Change and the Environment at LSE.Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEDeaton

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 6043.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email or call 020 7955 6043.

For further information please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.


Department of Economics Public Lecture: "Why Growth Theory Requires a Theory of the State Beyond Market Failures"

Date: Tuesday 8 October 2013
Time: 6.30-8pm 
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Speaker:  Professor Mariana Mazzucato
Chair:  Professor Danny Quah|

photograph of Mariana MazzucatoGovernment spending has a higher multiplier when that spending is 'directed' towards large missions. Whether this was putting 'a man on the moon' in the past, or tackling 'climate change' in the future, such missions require a strong intervention by government, beyond the usual justification tied to 'public goods' and 'externalities' (fixing market failures). The talk will consider the implications of mission oriented investments for understanding the role of the state in the economy, how to develop symbiotic (not parasitic) public-private partnerships, and how to judge the performance of state intervention beyond the crowding out-crowding framework.

Mariana Mazzucato| (pictured) is an economist, and holds the RM Phillips Chair in Science and Technology Policy at the University of Sussex (SPRU). Her work focuses on the relationship between financial markets, innovation and economic growth, and is currently funded by the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET), the Ford Foundation and the European Commission. Her book The Entrepreneurial State: debunking private vs. public sector myths| has been called 'heretical' by Forbes.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEMazzucato

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email events@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 6043.

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages.

The podcast is now available on the LSE News and Media| pages and on the Department of Economics YouTube channel|.


Department of Economics and Centre for Macroeconomics Public Lecture: "The Undercover Economist Strikes Back"

Date: Tuesday 1 October 2013 
Time: 7-8.30pm 
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Tim Harford
Chair:  Professor Silvana Tenreyro|
    

Photograph of Tim HarfordA million readers bought The Undercover Economist to get the lowdown on how economics works on a small scale, in our everyday lives. Since then, economics has become big news. Crises, austerity, riots, bonuses – all are in the headlines all the time. But how does this large-scale economic world really work? What would happen if we cancelled everyone’s debt? How do you create a job? Will the BRIC countries take over the world?

Asking - among many other things - what the future holds for the Euro, why the banks are still paying record bonuses and where government borrowing will take us, in The Undercover Economist Strikes Back|, Tim Harford (pictured) returns with his trademark clarity and wit to explain what’s really going on - and what it means for us all.

Tim Harford is a senior columnist for the Financial Times and the presenter of Radio 4’s More or Less and Pop-Up Economics With Tim Harford. He was the winner of the Bastiat Prize for economic journalism in 2006, and More or Less was commended for excellence in journalism by the Royal Statistical Society in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Harford lives in Oxford with his wife and three children, and is a visiting fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford. His other books include The Undercover Economist, The Logic of Life and Adapt.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEHarford

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required, only one ticket per person can be requested via the online ticket request form which will be live on this listing from around 6pm on Monday 23 September until at least 12noon on Tuesday 24 September.

LSE students and staff are also able to collect one ticket per person from the New Academic Building SU shop, located on the Kingsway side of the building from 10.00am on 24 September. These tickets are available on a first come, first serve basis.  

For further information, please visit the LSE Public Events| pages. 

The podcast is now available on the LSE News and Media| pages and on the Department of Economics YouTube channel|.


Lectures and Events Archive

Click on the Lectures and Events Archive| to find out about the lectures and events that took place in previous years.

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