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The design and development of the 'facts' logo

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Designed by Jon Adams, the "facts" logo is stamped onto most of the publications we produce (even a baby-gro). Like any logo, it is intended to make our work more recognisable, and to confer a unity on publications from the team. The logo has been through several incarnations as the project has moved on. The following shows the evolution and development of the "facts" logo.

A large pdf (2.5MB) of what follows, containing more information and several variant designs, is available here|.

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These early sketches show the development of the arrow motif. Initially, there were many arrows, all moving in different directions. Subsequently, it was realised that three arrows could yield a fourth, "ghost" arrow. By May 2005, a first version of the logo (top centre) was complete. 

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The version shown above left, with a thicker outline, was used until late 2006. Growing facility with Adobe Illustrator enabled the creation of a "tilted" version - to which might be added a shadow (a compressed radial gradient) or a reflection (from an opacity mask).

This version was created for a workshop on the transfer of technical knowledge - hence the exploded diagram. This version serves as a neat means of combining the positive/negative images that were originally employed.

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The design above, and those below, are experimental. The "building blocks" version (above) uses the "cut-out" spaces from the original logo in order to rebuild the design. Note that the text has been removed from the illustration. The two versions below significantly alter the original design, and were intended to provide a simpler, more basic version of what was becoming an increasingly ornate design. The cut-out motif recurs, but now there is an (only partially successful) attempt to form a "?" from the third arrow. These designs are unlikely to be used. 

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This image by Dr Jon Adams stood in as the front cover of the book until the current jacket was created.

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