Margot Salomon

Email: m.e.salomon@lse.ac.uk
Administrative support: Sarah Lee
Room: TW2.11.01F  (Tower 2)
Tel. 020-7955-6922

Margot Salomon is an Associate Professor in the Law Department and the Centre for the Study of Human Rights. She directs the new Laboratory for Advanced Research on the Global Economy, which launched in September 2013. Her research focuses on global economic justice, in particular the legal dimensions of world poverty and duties to distant strangers; development and international law; and human rights and economic orthodoxy. Her work explores the contribution and limits of international (human rights) law, concepts and mechanisms under conditions of globalisation, and engages with the normative paradigms of other disciplines operating in the realm of economic justice.

Dr Salomon was Guest Editor of the Global Policy Journal Special Section on International Law, Human Rights and the Global Economy: Innovations and Expectations for the 21st Century (2012); she is one of the authors of the legal 'Commentary to the Maastricht Principles on Extraterritorial Obligations of States in the area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights' (Human Rights Quarterly, 2012), and; lead author of the World Bank study on 'Human Rights and Economics: Tensions, Synergies and Ways Forward' (2012). Dr Salomon has been a consultant to the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on extreme poverty and human rights (2009), Advisor to the UN High-level Task Force on the Right to Development (2004-9), and a Member of the International Law Association's Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2008-2012). She currently sits as Vice Chair on the Executive Committee of the Association of Human Rights Institutes. In 2012 Dr Salomon was a Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow at the European University Institute.

At the LSE Dr Salomon sits on the Advisory Board of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights; coordinates a cross-departmental discussion group on Globalisation, Poverty and Responsibility, and is an Associate of the LSE's Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy. She is a Member of LSE's Scholars at Risk Steering Committee and its Ethics Policy Committee. Prior to joining the LSE in 2004, Dr Salomon was representative to the United Nations and to the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights of Minority Rights Group International.

Dr Salomon supervises PhD candidates in areas such as socio-economic rights, development and international law, and environmental rights, including as part of cross-disciplinary supervisory teams. Dr Salomon convenes the LLM courses World Poverty and Human Rights and Foundations of International Human Rights Law, and co-convenes the MSc Human Rights course Approaches to Human Rights. She holds a PhD in International Law from the LSE, an LLM in International Human Rights Law from University College London and an MA in Comparative European Social Studies from the University of Amsterdam. Her BA was received from Concordia University in Montreal.

Research Interests

Research interests: legal dimensions of world poverty and the nature and scope of international cooperation; the contribution and limits of international human rights law and concepts to issues of global economic justice; human rights and the global economy; human rights and economic development.

Other expertise: the rights of indigenous peoples; socio-economic rights; climate change; the role and responsibilities of international organisations (United Nations, World Bank etc).

 
External Activities
  • Guest Editor, Global Policy Journal. Special Section on International Law, Human Rights, and the Global Economy: Innovations and Expectations for the 21st Century (2012).

  • Lead author, World Bank Study on the Integration of Human Rights in Development Policies and Programs and its Economic Impact and Implications (Part 1: Human Rights and Economics: Tensions, Synergies and Ways Forward) (2012).

  • Vice-Chair, Association of Human Rights Institutes (2009-present).

  • Advisory Board, Centre for Law and Cosmopolitan Values, University of Antwerp (2009-present).

  • Expert Consultant, UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights:

    • Background Paper on the views of States and other Stakeholders/Conference Rapporteur/Final Report (Technical Review), Draft Guiding Principles on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights, (2009).  (P5) [click here for full text]

    • UN Social Forum, Human Rights and the Global Economy (2009).

    • UN High-Level Task Force on the Right to Development (2004-2009).

  • Editorial Board, European Yearbook of Human Rights (2009-present).

  • Associate, Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy, LSE (2008-present).

  • Senior Consultant, Ford Foundation, Darfur Initiative Evaluation (2008).

  • Association of Human Rights Institutes:

    • Member, Working Group on the UN Human Rights Monitoring Machinery. Research Project on the Role of the EU in UN Human Rights Reform (2008-2012).  

    • Member, Working Group on Human Rights and Development. Research Project on Human Rights, Peace and Security in EU Foreign Policy (2005-2008). 

  • Member, Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, International Law Association (2008-2012).

  • Visiting Lecturer, UN University, Tokyo (2005-2006).

 
Books  

Global Responsibility for Human Rights : World Poverty and the Development of International Law (Oxford University Press, 2007)

Challenges to the exercise of the basic socio-economic rights of half the global population give rise to some of the most pressing issues today. This timely book focuses on world poverty, providing a systematic exposition of the evolving legal responsibility of the international community of states to cooperate in addressing the structural obstacles that contribute to this injustice. This book analyzes the approach, contribution, and current limitations of the international law of human rights to the manifestations of world poverty, inviting the reader to rethink human rights, and, in particular, the framing of responsibilities that are essential to their contemporary protection

Reviews:

The Cambridge Law Journal 2008 Vol. 67 (3) pp 656-658

European Journal of International Law 2009 20 (3) 922-923

Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 2009 29 (4) 827-847

Public Law 2009 (Oct) 866-869  [LSE LOGIN]

‘Margot E. Salomon, Arne Tostensen and Wouter Vandenhole (eds), Casting the Net Wider: Human Rights, Development and New Duty-Bearers (Intersentia, 2007).

This edited volume brings together scholars and practitioners to address the question as to whether, in our globalised world, the protection of economic, social and cultural rights in the South has or should become the duty of actors beyond the state. It explores the role of actors such as transnational business, international financial institutions, supranational organisations and influential states that are involved in or impact on human rights in developing countries. In adopting a ‘responsibilities approach’, it seeks to clarify the nature, content and scope of their contemporary duties.

 
Selected articles
and chapters in books
 

‘How to Keep Promises: Making Sense of the Duty Among Multiple States to Fulfil Socio-Economic Rights in the World’, SHARES Research Paper 53 (2014) [forthcoming in: André Nollkaemper and Dov Jacobs (eds.), Distribution of Responsibilities in International Law (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015)]

(with Colin Arnott) 'Better Development Decision-making Applying International Human Rights Law to Neoclassical Ecnomics' Nordic Journal of Human Rights (2014) 32 (1) pp.44-74

This paper aims to demonstrate that a human rights-compliant normative approach offers solutions to some of the specific areas of concern for economic decision-making in the context of development, as well as for meeting the requirements of human rights. The authors, an international lawyer and economist respectively, draw on the doctrines that inform international human rights law in the area of socio-economic rights and by providing a careful construction that meets the didactic demands of a cross-disciplinary inquiry, reveal how the externally-generated ethical criteria of international human rights law provide welfare economics with the justice-centred guidance it lacks, moving it beyond the conventional premises of economic efficiency and aggregate social utility. The merits of this study transcend that of academic pursuit: most international organisations favour mainstream economics with development economists adopting the value judgments and allocation efficiency principles of neoclassical welfare economics. Integrating the normative demands of human rights into mainstream economic thinking and decision-making may thus offer international development and financial institutions insights that help set alternative norms and value judgments that can act as an integral complement to welfare economic analysis.

‘From NIEO to Now and the Unfinishable Story of Economic Justice’,  International and Comparative Law Quarterly (2013) 62, pp.31-54

Why have attempts to bring development aspirations to bear on international law over a period of 50 years come to far less than any reasonable person would hope? The early claims for a New International Economic Order and permanent sovereignty by developing countries over their natural resources, efforts to delineate a body of international development law, followed by the affirmation of a human right to development, were all attempts to have economic justice reflected in international law. Figures on world poverty and inequality suggest that international law accommodated no such restructuring. This article explores why it is international law has failed the poor of the world, and what interests it has served in their stead.

‘Deprivation, Causation and the Law of International Cooperation’ in M. Langford, W. Vandenhole, M. Scheinin and W. van Genugten (eds), Global Justice, State Duties: The Extra-Territorial Scope of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2013)

'Commentary to the Maastricht Principles on Extraterritorial Obligations of States in the area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights' Human Rights Quarterly 34 (2012) 1084–1169

'Why Should it Matter that Others Have More? - Poverty, Inequality and the Potential of International Human Rights Law', Proceedings of the Oxford University Conference on International Law and Global Justice, Review of International Studies (2011) 37 (5) pp.2137-2155

'International Human Rights Obligations in Context: Structural Obstacles and the Demands of Global Justice' in Bard A. Andreassen, Stephen P. Marks (eds.)  Development as a Human Right: Legal, Political and Economic Dimensions (2nd edn Intersentia, 2010)

‘Social Justice and Human Rights’ in A. Walker, D. Gordon et al (eds), The Peter Townsend Reader (The Policy Press, 2010).

'Poverty, Privilege and International Law: The Millennium Development Goals and the Guise of Humanitarianism', German Yearbook of International Law 51 (2008).

‘International Economic Governance and Human Rights Accountability’ in Margot E. Salomon, Arne Tostensen and Wouter Vandenhole (eds), Casting the Net Wider: Human Rights, Development and New Duty-Bearers (Intersentia, 2007).

‘Socio-Economic Rights as Minority Rights’ in Marc Weller (ed), Universal Minority Rights: A Commentary on the Jurisprudence of International Courts and Treaty Bodies (Oxford University Press, 2007).

‘International Human Rights Obligations in Context: Structural Obstacles and the Demands of Global Justice, in B-A. Andreassen and S.P. Marks (eds.), Development as a Human Right: Legal, Political and Economic Dimensions (Harvard University Press, 2006).

'Towards a Just Institutional Order: A Commentary on the First Session of the UN Task Force on the Right to Development’,  23 Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights 3 (2005).

'Masking Inequality in the Name of Rights: The Examination of Fiji's State Report under the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination', Asia-Pacific Journal on Human Rights and the Law, 1(2003)

 

Reports / Essays

‘Austerity, Human Rights and Europe’s Accountability Gap’, Open Democracy – Open Global Rights (March 2014).

‘Human Rights are also about Social Justice: A Reply to Aryeh Neier’, Open Democracy – Open Global Rights (July 2013)

'The Maastricht Principles on Extraterritorial Obligations in the Area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights: An Overview of Positive "Obligations to Fulfil"’ EJIL:Talk!  16 November 2012

‘The Future of Human Rights’, Introduction to the Special Section on International Law, Human Rights and the Global Economy: Innovations and Expectations for the 21st Century, Guest Editor M.E. Salomon, 4 Global Policy 3 (November 2012)

(with Ian Seiderman) 'Human Rights Norms for a Globalized World: The Maastricht Principles on Extraterritorial Obligations of States in the area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights'  Special Section on International Law, Human Rights and the Global Economy: Innovations and Expectations for the 21st Century, Guest Editor M.E. Salomon, 4 Global Policy 3 (November 2012).

'Is there a Legal Duty to Address World Poverty?' Global Governance Programme, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute, Working Paper 2012/03

'The Ethics of Foreign Investment: Agricultural Land in Africa,' published in The Majalla, 5 August 2010

Global Economic Policy and Human Rights: Three Sites of Disconnection, published on Carnegie Council website, 2010

Sakiko Fukuda-Parr and Margot E. Salomon, 'A Human Rights Analysis of the G20 Communiqué: Recent Awareness of the "Human Cost" Is Not Quite Enough', Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs, 4 May 2009

'Legal Cosmopolitanism and the Normative Contribution of the Right to Development' in S.P. Marks (ed), Implementing the Right to Development: The Role of International Law (Harvard School of Public Health/Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, 2008).

Technical Review: Draft Guiding Principles on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights, UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (2009).

‘The Significance of the Task Force on the Right to Development’, Special Report, Human Rights and Development, Guest Editors: R. Danino and J.K. Ingram, 8 Development Outreach, The World Bank, 2 (May 2006).