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Public Lectures and Events 2007/08


For a full list of law-related Public Lectures and Events at the LSE, please see our Events page.

A selection of lectures are available as mp3 audio files:-

 

3 December 2008
In Conversation with Cherie Blair
>> listen to the mp3 (29 mb; approx 62 minutes)
26 November 2008
Forensic Anthropology: the reconstruction of the truth in the fight against impunity
>> listen to the mp3 (35 mb; approx 75 minutes)
25 November 2008
Ross Cranston, QC in Conversation with Lord Mackay of Clashfern
>> listen to the mp3 (35 mb; approx 76 minutes)
12 November 2008
Human Rights in United Nations Action: Norms, Institutions and Leadership
>> listen to the mp3 (24 mb; approx 53 minutes)
10 November 2008
Torturing Democracy Through the American Wars on Crime and Terrorism?
>> listen to the mp3 (39 mb; approx 84 minutes)
16 October 2008
Inhuman and Degrading Treatment: the words themselves
>> listen to the mp3
(40.4 mb; approx 88 minutes)
7 October 2008
The International Criminal Court Ten Years On
>> listen to the mp3
(19.4 mb; approx 85 minutes)
1 May 2008
Religious Faith and Human Rights
>> listen to the mp3

(22 mb; approx 97 minutes)
19 February 2008
The Shrivelling of European Citizenship
>> listen to the mp3
(20 mb; approx 89 minutes)
28 January 2008
Somalia: Legal and Humanitarian Challenges
>> listen to the mp3
(21 mb; approx 93 minutes)
23 January 2008
General Reflections
(General Sir Mike Jackson)
>> listen to the mp3
(15 mb; approx 64 minutes)
06/12/07
Human Rights in the 21st century: problems and prospects
>> listen to the mp3
(20 mb; approx 88 minutes)
04/12/07
Escaping the Prisoners' Dilemma
>> listen to the mp3
(16 mb; approx 68 minutes)
21/11/07
The Future of Broadcasting – Public Service in a Digital Age
>> listen to the mp3
(16 mb; approx 68 minutes)
14/11/07
Iraq and the Law: what went wrong?
>> listen to the mp3
(18 mb; approx 81 minutes)
06/11/07
Field Notes: Human rights defenders speak
>> listen to the mp3
(14 mb; approx 59 minutes)
25/10/07
Marking a New Era for Equality and Human Rights in Britain
>> listen to the mp3
(22 mb; approx 98 minutes)
24/10/07
Are Solicitors' Lives Necessarily Boring?
(Legal Biography Project)
>> listen to the mp3
(11 mb; approx 42 minutes)
22/10/07
Cornered in the Centre: aid and development in a rough neighbourhood
>> listen to the mp3
(20 mb; approx 87 minutes)
17/10/07
Panel Discussion on Judicial Biography
(Legal Biography Project)
>> listen to the mp3
(15 mb; approx 66 minutes)
11/10/07
Litigating Human Rights in the Context of International Terrorism
>> listen to the mp3
(14 mb; approx 62 minutes)
10/10/07
A Life In Law
(Legal Biography Project)
>> listen to the mp3
(13 mb; approx 60 minutes)
10/10/07
A Life In Law
(Legal Biography Project)
>> listen to the mp3
(13 mb; approx 60 minutes)
11/10/07
Litigating Human Rights in the Context of International Terrorism
>> listen to the mp3
(14 mb; approx 62 minutes)
17/10/07
Panel Discussion on Judicial Biography
(Legal Biography Project)
>> listen to the mp3
(15 mb; approx 66 minutes)
22/10/07
Cornered in the Centre: aid and development in a rough neighbourhood
>> listen to the mp3
(20 mb; approx 87 minutes)
24/10/07
Are Solicitors' Lives Necessarily Boring?
(Legal Biography Project)
>> listen to the mp3
(11 mb; approx 42 minutes)
25/10/07
Marking a New Era for Equality and Human Rights in Britain
>> listen to the mp3
(22 mb; approx 98 minutes)
06/11/07
Field Notes: Human rights defenders speak
>> listen to the mp3
(14 mb; approx 59 minutes)
14/11/07
Iraq and the Law: what went wrong?
>> listen to the mp3
(18 mb; approx 81 minutes)
21/11/07
The Future of Broadcasting – Public Service in a Digital Age
>> listen to the mp3
(16 mb; approx 68 minutes)
04/12/07
Escaping the Prisoners' Dilemma
>> listen to the mp3
(16 mb; approx 68 minutes)
06/12/07
Human Rights in the 21st century: problems and prospects
>> listen to the mp3
(20 mb; approx 88 minutes)
23/01/08
General Reflections
(General Sir Mike Jackson)
>> listen to the mp3
(15 mb; approx 64 minutes)
28/01/08
Somalia: Legal and Humanitarian Challenges
>> listen to the mp3
(21 mb; approx 93 minutes)
 
19/02/08
The Shrivelling of European Citizenship
>> listen to the mp3
(20 mb; approx 89 minutes)
 
01/05/08
Religious Faith and Human Rights
>> listen to the mp3

(22 mb; approx 97 minutes)

 

News Archive

 

14 December 2012

Dr Kleinheisterkamp heard at the European Parliament on investment-states dispute

Dr Jan Kleinheisterkamp was invited to present his comments on the implications of the Commission’s proposal for a new regulation on financial responsibility resulting from investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms in future investment agreements concluded by the EU [COM(2012) 355 final] on the last meeting of the European Parliament’s Committee on International Trade (INTA). The proposal addresses issues of the allocation of responsibilities between the EU and the Member States in case of claims by foreign investors against them in international arbitration proceedings but indirectly also raises questions regarding the grounds for liability to foreign investors to which the EU would expose itself in future EU investment agreements with third countries. The EU is currently negotiating a free trade agreement with Canada that will, indeed, be the first to contain an investment chapter and most likely include investor-state arbitration. Dr Kleinheisterkamp already co-authored the LSE study “The EU Approach to International Investment Policy after the Lisbon Treaty” for the Parliament’s INTA Committee in 2010 and subsequently advised the shadow rapporteurs of INTA as a legal expert in their first round of negotiations on the amendments to the draft Regulation on transitional arrangements for bilateral investment agreements between member states and third countries [COM(2010) 344 final].

 

14 December 2012

Dr Scott’s evidence on Defamation Bill ‘persuades’ Joint Committee on Human Rights

The Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights has recently published its report scrutinising the compliance of the Defamation Bill that is currently passing through Parliament with Convention rights. With Professor Alastair Mullis of the University of East Anglia, Dr Andrew Scott submitted evidence to the Committee on two points: the desirability of a new public interest defence for publishers (clause 4), and the prospective illegality of any ‘single publication rule’ (clause 8) and the preference for an alternative defence of ‘non-culpable republication’.
    In the first regard, the Committee concluded that it was ‘persuaded by the reasoning’ offered in the evidence submitted, and recommended the adoption of the new public interest defence discussed (paras 27-28). In the latter regard, the Committee emphasised concerns raised in the submitted evidence. It concluded by asking “the Government to reassure us that Clause 8, as drafted, will provide adequate protection for subsequent publication of defamatory material. If, however, the Government cannot persuade us that Clause 8 will function effectively so as to curb litigation for multiple publication, we would encourage the Government to explore an alternative defence of non-culpable republication”.

The evidence submitted by Dr Scott and Professor Mullis is available here: http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/joint-select/human-rights-committee/legislative-scrutiny-2012-13/defamation-bill/

The report of the Joint Committee is available here: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/jt201213/jtselect/jtrights/84/8402.htm

 

 

10 December 2012

NEW BOOK: Resolving Transfer Pricing Disputes: A Global Analysis

A new book  edited by  Eduardo Baistrocchi and Ian Roxan:

Via a global analysis of more than 180 transfer pricing cases from 20 representative jurisdictions, Resolving Transfer Pricing Disputes explains how the law on transfer pricing operates in practice and examines how disputes between taxpayers and tax administrations are dealt with around the world. It has been designed to be an essential complement to the OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and Tax Administrations, which focus on transfer pricing issues but do not refer to specific transfer pricing disputes. All of the transfer pricing cases discussed in the book are linked to the relevant paragraphs of the OECD Guidelines by means of a 'Golden Bridge', namely a table listing the cases according to the paragraphs of the Guidelines to which they refer. It therefore provides examples of the application of the Arm's Length Principle in many settings on all continents.

 

 

5 December 2012

Salomon on World Poverty and International Law cited at Brussels Dialogue

The work of Dr Margot Salomon was extensively quoted in a keynote speech at The EU Fundamental Rights Agency and EU Committee of the Regions 4th Annual Dialogue in Brussels (24/09/12) by Nikolas Kyriakou, Cypriot presidency Chair of the Council Working Party on Fundamental Rights. Kyriakou noted that the current economic crisis is 'not incidental, nor a one-off event destined to be eventually somehow overcome. To the contrary, it is the very by-product of the economic model that our societies have endorsed. In the words of Margot Salomon, an academic at LSE: “[i]t is also the very design of the economic order, which contributes to the perpetuation of world poverty, or, at a minimum, has failed to relieve poverty”' Kyriakou cited both Dr Salomon's Global Responsibility for Human Rights: World Poverty and the Development of International Law (Oxford University Press, 2007) and ‘Poverty, Privilege and International Law: The Millennium Development Goals and the Guise of Humanitarianism’, Special Issue on Poverty as a Challenge to International Law, 51 German Yearbook of International Law (2008).

 

27 November 2012

Anthea Roberts wins 2012 Philip Leverhulme Prize

Congratulations to Anthea Roberts who has been awarded a 2012 Philip Leverhulme Prize. These Prizes, with a value of £70,000 each, are awarded to outstanding scholars who have made a substantial and recognised contribution to their particular field of study, recognised at an international level, and where the expectation is that their greatest achievement is yet to come.

The Prize commemorate the contribution to the work of the Trust made by Philip Leverhulme, the Third Viscount Leverhulme and grandson of the Founder. Anthea will use the Prize to further her research on public international law and, in particular, investment treaty law and arbitration. For more information, see http://www.leverhulme.ac.uk/news/awards/plp.cfm


Anthea Roberts appointed as a Reporter for the Restatement (4th) of the Foreign Relations of the United States

Anthea Roberts has been appointed as a Reporter on Jurisdiction for the Restatement (4th) of the Foreign Relations of the United States under the auspices of the American Law Institute. The Restatement (3rd) has had a significant impact on shaping international law both inside and outside the United States but the ALI has decided that it needs to be revised and updated.

The two Coordinating Reporters for the project will be Professors Paul Stephan and Sarah Cleveland. Anthea Roberts will be a Co-Reporter on the section on Jurisdiction with Professors Paul Stephan and William Dodge. Anthea is one of the first non-American Reporters ever selected to join an ALI Restatement Project. In addition to her international law expertise, Anthea has been a Visiting Professor at Harvard Law School and Columbia Law School and worked for five years at the US law firm, Debevoise & Plimpton.

The Restatement (4th) project brings together a number of high profile international law academics and practitioners in the United States and elsewhere, including current and former Legal Advisers for the US State Department and UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the current US Judge on the International Court of Justice. For a full listing, see http://www.ali.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=projects.members&projectid=28.


 

23 November 2012

NEW BOOK: The Cambridge Companion to Human Rights Law

A new book  edited by  Prof Conor Gearty and Prof Costas  Douzinas

Human rights are considered one of the big ideas of the early twenty-first century. This book presents in an authoritative and readable form the variety of platforms on which human rights law is practiced today, reflecting also on the dynamic inter-relationships that exist between these various levels. The collection has a critical edge. The chapters engage with how human rights law has developed in its various subfields, what (if anything) has been achieved and at what cost, in terms of expected or produced unexpected side-effects. The authors pass judgment about the consistency, efficacy and success of human rights law (set against the standards of the field itself or other external goals). Written by world-class academics, this Companion will be essential reading for students and scholars of human rights law.

22 November 2012

JOB VACANCIES

Please click below to see more details for each vacancy:

Lectureship/Senior Lectureship in Insolvency

Lectureships/Senior Lectureships in Property and Trusts

 

19 November 2012

NEW BOOK: The Regulatory Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis

In The Regulatory Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis (Cambridge University Press), Professor Niamh Moloney of the LSE's Law Department, Professor Eilis Ferran (University of Cambridge), Professor Jennifer Hill (University of Sydney) and Professor John C. Coffee (Columbia Law School) examine the regulatory response internationally to the financial crisis. The EU and the US responded to the global financial crisis by changing the rules for the functioning of financial services and markets and by establishing new oversight bodies. With the US Dodd–Frank Act and numerous EU regulations and directives now in place, this book provides a timely and thoughtful explanation of the key elements of the new regimes in both regions, of the political processes which shaped their content and of their practical impact. Insights from areas such as economics, political science and financial history elucidate the significance of the reforms. Australia's resilience during the financial crisis, which contrasted sharply with the severe problems that were experienced in the EU and the US, is also examined. The comparison between the performances of these major economies in a period of such extreme stress tells us much about the complex regulatory and economic ecosystems of which financial markets are a part.

 

19 November 2012

Delivering Women Peace & Security

Christine Chinkin delivered the keynote address at an All-Ireland Conference on 'Delivering Women Peace & Security' (5 November); a presentation on the same topic to the Inter-Parliamentary Union Conference on Gender and Politics (7 November); and another on Challenging a Culture of Impunity at a Wilton Park Conference on Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict and Post-Conflict Situations (12 – 14 November). She has been asked by the Foreign Secretary, William Hague to join the external steering board for his personal initiative on Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict.

 

15 November 2012

Prof Murray on photo sharing

Professor Andrew Murray was quoted extensively by the Metro newspaper yesterday in an article on photo sharing via social media and the law.

 

13 November 2012

LSE100 Prize-winners

Congratulations to two LSE100 prize-winners on the LLB Programme: Jessica Hui -Winner of the Sir Robert Worcester Prizes for exceptional academic performance (awarded for best overall mark on LSE100), and Hannah Kam – awarded an LSE100 prize for outstanding academic achievement.

12 November 2012

Dr. Gangjee addresses WTO delegates on Geographical Indications

Dr Dev Gangjee was invited as an expert by the European Commission, to make a presentation at the WTO in Geneva on November 7. He presented research on the role of Geographical Indications (GIs) in rural and regional development initiatives to the ambassadors of the W52 coalition of over one hundred WTO members. This coalition is in favour of extending the scope of international protection for GIs, which include regional designations such as Darjeeling, Café de Colombia or Bordeaux. The roundtable discussions formed part of the broader Doha Development Agenda negotiations at the WTO.
 

7 November 2012

Humphreys keynote at Rafto prize ceremony in Norway

Dr Humphreys was a keynote speaker at the Rafto human rights prize award ceremony in Bergen, Norway, on November 3. The prize was awarded to Nigerian poet and environmental activist Nnimmo Bassey. Humphreys also participated in a televised debate together with the Norwegian Minister for International Development Heikki Eidsvoll Holmås, Nnimmo Bassey, and Statoil Senior Vice President Hege Marie Norheim.
    The Bergen-based Rafto Foundation has awarded the Rafto Prize for Human Rights annually since 1987. The prize commemorates Thorolf Rafto, professor of economic history at the Norwegian School of Economics in Bergen. A number of Rafto laureates have subsequently been awarded the Nobel prize, including Aung San Suu Kyi, the 1990 awardee.

6 November 2012

NEW BOOK: Elements of Legislation

In Elements of Legislation, Professor Neil Duxbury examines the history of English law through the lens of legal philosophy in an effort to draw out the differences between judge-made and enacted law and to explain what courts do with the laws that legislatures enact. He presents a series of rigorously researched and carefully rehearsed arguments concerning the law-making functions of legislatures and courts, the concepts of legislative supremacy and judicial review, the nature of legislative intent and the core principles of statutory interpretation.

 

 

2 November 2012

Dr Braithwaite appointed Academic Fellow of the Inner Temple

Congratulations to Dr Jo Braithwaite who has been appointed an Academic Fellow of the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple. The Inner Temple Academic Fellows Scheme aims to recognise the outstanding contribution of legal teaching and research of early to mid-career academics. It also aims to support their research and to build a stronger relationship between the Bar and legal academia.

 

1 November 2012

NEW BOOK: The Global Model of Constitutional Rights

Dr Kai Moller's new book The Global Model of Constitutional Rights is published by Oxford University Press.

Since the end of the Second World War and the subsequent success of constitutional judicial review, one particular model of constitutional rights has had remarkable success, first in Europe and now globally. This global model of constitutional rights is characterized by an extremely broad approach to the scope of rights (sometimes referred to as 'rights inflation'), the acceptance of horizontal effect of rights, positive obligations, and increasingly also socio-economic rights, and the use of the doctrines of balancing and proportionality to determine the permissible limitations of rights.
    Drawing on analyses of a broad range of cases from the UK, the European Court of Human Rights, Germany, Canada, the US, and South Africa, this book provides the first substantive moral, reconstructive theory of the global model. It shows that it is based on a coherent conception of constitutional rights which connects to attractive accounts of judicial review, democracy and the separation of powers.
   The first part of the book develops a theory of the scope of rights under the global model. It defends the idea of a general right to personal autonomy: a right to everything which, according to the agent's self-conception, is in his or her interest. The function of this right is to acknowledge that every act by a public authority which places a burden on a person's autonomy requires justification. The second part of the book proposes a theory of the structure of this justification which offers original and useful accounts of the important doctrines of balancing and proportionality.


 

1 November 2012

Professor Black appointed to SRA Board

Professor Julia Black has been appointed to the Board of the Solicitors Regulatory Authority, and will take up the position in January 2014. The Solicitors Regulation Authority is the independent regulator of solicitors, the firms in which they operate and all those working within those firms. It regulates in the public interest. Its work is overseen by the SRA Board, which is made up of 17 members, of which nine are solicitors (including the Chair) and eight are lay members.

 

 

26 October 2012

JOB VACANCIES

Please click below to see more details for each vacancy:

Executive LLM Programme Administrator

Lectureship in Commercial Law

Lectureship in Criminology

Lectureship in Tax Law

 

 

25 October 2012

New Papers in the Working Paper Series

We are delighted to announce the second issue of the LSE Law Department's Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series for 2012. 

In this issue, Michael Wilkinson (WP6/2012) critiques John Dewey and his contemporary admirers for neglecting the politics of democratic experimentalism; Hugh Collins (WP7/2012) examines the application of fundamental human rights to private law; Jan Komárek (WP8/2012) discusses approaches to reasoning with previous decisions in continental European and common law traditions; Alastair Mullis and Andrew Scott (WP9/2012) consider the use of libel law in disputes involving religious differences; Susan Marks (WP10/2012) critically explores the intellectual framework of human rights, using the riots in London in August 2011 as an example; Philipp Paech (WP11/2012) investigates the holding of intermediated securities; Christian Helmers and Luke McDonagh (WP12/2012) present an overview of the characteristics of patent litigation in the UK; Christian Helmers and Luke McDonagh (WP13/2012) in a second paper investigate litigation undertaken by Patent Assertion Entities, also known as ‘patent trolls’; Dan Awrey, William Blair, and David Kershaw WP14/2012) explore whether there is a role for culture and ethics in financial regulation; and Julia Black (WP15/2012) highlights the difficulties of accountability of regulatory agencies.

 

 

16 October 2012

Dr Murkens' evidence to Commons Foreign Affairs Select Committee

Dr Jo Murkens gave evidence today at the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Select Committee’s inquiry into the foreign policy implications of and for a separate Scotland. The committee considered the law on state succession, Scotland and the UK’s relations with the EU and the UN and the UK’s likely international reputation and standing in the event of Scottish independence.

 

15 October 2012

Marusa Vasconcelos Freire awarded Creative Economy Prize

Congratulations to Marusa Vasconcelos Freire, whose doctoral thesis “Moedas Sociais: Contributo em Prol de um Marco Legal e Regulatório para as Moedas Sociais Circulantes Locais no Brasil“ [Social Currencies: Contributions to the Definition of a Legal and Regulatory Framework of Local Social Currencies in Brazil] was recently awarded the Creative Economy Prize by the Ministry of Culture of Brazil. The work was one of the 19 texts distinguished with the ‘Creative Economy Prize’ of 2012. Academically, the thesis of Marusa Freire was approved by the Graduate Program of the Faculty of Law of the Universidade de Brasília in 2011.
    The work by Marusa Freire, who was formerly head of the Legal Office of the Central Bank of Brazil, benefitted from, and incorporated, discussions conducted by the Law, Economy and Society Group (LESG) of the Faculty of Law of the Universidade de Brasília. The LESG is coordinated by professor Marcus Faro de Castro since 2007.
    One of the distinguishing contributions of Freire’s work is that it develops a legal and interdisciplinary treatment of money as a “complex social institution” which is and must be legally regulated in order to promote equitable and sustainable development. This was recognized by the Ministry of Culture, who awarded the prize to works which have significantly “enlarged the discussion of an issue that is of strategic importance in the promotion of sustainable development in Brazil”.

 

 

5 October 2012

NEW BOOK: Hobbes and the Law

Hobbes's political thought provokes a perennial fascination. It has become particularly prominent in recent years, with the surge of scholarly interest evidenced by a number of monographs in political theory and philosophy. At the same time, there has been a turn in legal scholarship towards political theory in a way that engages recognisably Hobbesian themes, for example the relationship between security and liberty. However, there is surprisingly little engagement with Hobbes's views on legal theory in general and on certain legal topics, despite the fact that Hobbes devoted whole works to legal inquiry and gave law a prominent role in his works focused on politics. This volume, edited by Thomas Poole, David Dyzenhaus, seeks to remedy this gap by providing the first collection of specially commissioned essays devoted to Hobbes and the law.

 

1 October 2012

NEW BOOK: Labour Law

Building on their successful cases and materials book, Hugh Collins, Keith Ewing and Aileen McColgan present an entirely restructured and freshly written new textbook on employment law. Comprehensive and engaging, it combines detailed analysis and commentary on the law with short contextual extracts to fully equip the labour law student. Carefully balancing clear exposition of legal principles with critical and scholarly analysis, this is the definitive textbook on the subject written by the UK's foremost employment law scholars. The book's 20-part structure maps logically onto either a full or half module employment law course. Chapter introductions and conclusions and an uncluttered text design carefully guide the student through the material. Innovative case studies show the law 'in action' and discussion of the globalised workplace gives the work a contemporary feel. Put simply, this is required reading for all students of the subject.

 

27 September 2012

Giuliano Castellano on supervising European financial markets

Earlier this month, the European Commission proposed that the European Central Bank be entrusted with supervisory powers over the eurozone’s banks. Giuliano G. Castellano writing in European Politics and Policy (LSE Public Policy Group) argues that this move reaffirms the necessity to establish an EU-wide, or supranational, supervisory structure over European financial markets (and not only the banking sector) that is detached from the national interests of member states.

 

18 September 2012

Dr McDonagh at British Literary and Artistic Copyright Assocation

Dr. Luke McDonagh presented a seminar to the British Literary and Artistic Copyright Association on 13 September, in which he addressed the issue of joint authorship and music. He argued that in light of recent copyright cases, where there is a group in which one person composes the music, but all group members perform during the recording of the final released version, the musicians who perform during the recording of the song are entitled to a joint authorship share in the musical arrangement which results. He stated that although the music industry has rarely recognised this, and composers tend to receive the most royalties, the position under the law is quite clear.

 

17 September 2012

Dr Rowan and Dr Rundle Win Birks Book Prize 2012

 

Lady Hale, Dr Rowan, Dr Rundle, Prof Stanton

Congratulations to Dr Kristen Rundle and Dr Solène Rowan, who have won the prestigious Birks Book Prize 2012, awarded annually for two outstanding published books by legal scholars in their early careers.

1st Prize: Dr Rowan's Remedies for Breach of Contract: A Comparative Analysis of the Protection of Performance (OUP : 2012).

2nd Prize:  Dr Rundle's Forms Liberate (Hart Publishing : 2012)

         

 

 

3 September 2012

Prof Gearty receives honorary doctorate from Brunel University and elected Master of the Bench of Middle Temple

Professor Conor Gearty has recently been awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws by Brunel University, and elected to be one of the Masters of the Bench at Middle Temple.

Professor Gearty was born in Abbeylara, Ireland, and graduated in law from University College Dublin before moving to Wolfson College, Cambridge in 1980 to study for a Master’s degree and then a PhD. He became a fellow of Emmanuel College Cambridge in 1983 and moved to King’s College London’s School of Law at in 1990, where he was first a Senior Lecturer, then a Reader and finally, from 1995, a Professor. He was Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights from 2002 to 2009 and is now Professor of Human Rights Law in LSE’s Law Department. He has published widely on terrorism, civil liberties and human rights.

 

31 August 2012

Professor Fisher QC on Proceeds of Crime Act

Visiting Professor Jonathan Fisher QC recently discussed problems with the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in the Times (23/08/12), analysing the reasons for why only 40% of confiscated assets are recovered.
     Professor Fisher has also been invited to deliver a Distinguished Professorial Address on 14 March 2013 by the University of the West of England, where he  will address the highly topical subject, “Policing the Financial Markets”.

Further details  http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/bl/bbs/newsandevents/dpaseries/professorjonathanfisher.aspx

 

24 July 2012

Professor Fisher QC on prosecution of financial crime

Jonathan Fisher QCVisiting Professor Jonathan Fisher QC writes in the Daily Telegraph that unless the Government changes its approach to how companies are held criminally liable, "deferred prosecution agreements" will have a limited impact.

Jonathan Fisher QC has also recently been appointed a special adviser by the House of Commons Treasury Committee to assist the Committee in its investigation into the issues relating to the penalties levied against Barclays Bank by authorities in the UK and the US following an investigation into submission of various interbank (LIBOR and EURIBOR) offered rates.

The Treasury Committee operates as a Select Committee appointed by the House of Commons to examine the expenditure, administration and policy of HM Treasury, HM Revenue & Customs, and associated public bodies, including the Bank of England and the Financial Services Authority.

Before his appointment, Jonathan was interviewed by BBC News and Sky News about the Barclays / LIBOR issues on the 28th June 2012 after the FSA published its Final Notice recording that a financial penalty of £59.5 million had been levied on Barclays Bank in accordance with section 206 of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000.

Jonathan teaches Corporate and Financial Crime and International Economic Sanctions on the LLM programme. In addition, he practises in cases involving corporate and financial crime (fraud, financial services regulation, and economic sanctions), proceeds of crime (money laundering, confiscation, and civil recovery) and tax disputes (avoidance, evasion, investigations). The forthcoming UK Chambers and Partners Bar Guide 2013 names Jonathan as a leading barrister in three fields - Fraud (Criminal); Proceeds of Crime; Tax".
 

 

16 July 2012

NEW BOOK: Practice and Theory in Comparative Law

Practice and Theory in Comparative Law, edited by Jacco Bomhoff and Maurice Adams, has just been published by Cambridge University Press. What does doing comparative law involve? Too often, explicit methodological discussions in comparative law remain limited to the level of pure theory, neglecting to test out critiques and recommendations on concrete issues. This book bridges this gap between theory and practice in comparative legal studies. Essays by both established and younger comparative lawyers reflect on the methodological challenges arising in their own work and in work in their area. Taken together, they offer clear recommendations for, and critical reflection on, a wide range of innovative comparative research projects.

 

11 July 2012

Professor Moloney at House of Lords Committee

Professor Niamh Moloney recently gave evidence to the House of Lords European Union Committee (Sub Committee on Economic and Financial Affairs). Her evidence related to the Committee’s review of the EU Commission’s proposed reforms to the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (the MiFID II reforms). Her evidence on the reform of this cornerstone EU measure was cited in the Committee’s Report which was published on July 10. The Report is available at: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld201213/ldselect/ldeucom/28/28.pdf

 

9 July 2012

Legal Biography Project Studentship:

New Research Grant: The Changing face of Local Justice; examining the shift to centralised justice

The Arts and Humanities Research Council have recently awarded a three year grant to fund a unique new collaborative project between LSE’s Legal Biography Project and National Life Stories (the oral history fieldwork charity based at the British Library) which will focus on the lives of Crown Court clerks. The funding comes in the form of a three year studentship and we are now looking for a suitable candidate domiciled in the UK or EU with an interest in legal life histories. The successful applicant will register for a PhD while working on this project which provides an exciting opportunity for an early career scholar to benefit from support and training from LSE and National Life Stories.

2 July 2012

New Lecture Series : Causes and Things

Dr Luke McDonagh (Law) unpicks the story of how a famous pop melody ended in legal disharmony , as part of LSE's inaugural 'Causes and Things' lecture.

 

2 July 2012

NEW BOOK: Policing: Politics, Culture and Control

Edited by Professor Tim Newburn and Professor Jill Peay, bringing together a range of leading social scientists and criminologists, this volume explores a number of key themes raised by the work of Robert Reiner (Emeritus Professor of Criminology, LSE). Arguably the leading policing scholar of his generation, Reiner's work over some 40 years has ranged broadly in this field, taking in the study of police history, culture, organisation, elites and relationships with the media. Always carefully situated within an analysis of the changing socio-political circumstances of policing and crime control, Robert Reiner's scholarship has been path-breaking in its impact.

The 13 original essays in this volume are testament to Reiner's influence. Although reflecting the primarily British bent within his work, the essays also draw on contributors from Australia, Europe, South Africa and the United States to explore some of the leading debates of the moment. These include, but are not limited to, the impact of neo-liberalism on crime control and the challenges for modern social democracy; police culture, equality and political economy; new media and the future of policing; youth, policing and democracy, and the challenges and possibilities posed by globalisation in the fields of policing and security.

 

 

20 June 2012

Freedom comes with law, Aung San Suu Kyi tells world during LSE visit

Aung San Suu KyiBurmese democracy campaigner Aung San Suu Kyi told an LSE audience that fairness and freedom can only be restored to her country under the rule of law.
    Speaking on her first visit to the UK for 24 years, the Nobel Peace Prize winner said that unity in Burma and a new constitution could only be achieved within a legal framework. “This is what we all need - unless we see that justice is to be done, we cannot proceed to genuine democracy”, she told an audience of students, staff and visitors.
    She said that she condemned violence wherever it occurred, but that a full understanding of its causes was key: “Resolving conflict is not about condemnation, it’s about finding the roots, the causes of that conflict and how they can be resolved in the best way possible.”
    The leader of the National League of Democracy in Burma took part in a panel discussion with LSE professors Mary Kaldor (Department of International Development) and Christine Chinkin (Department of Law), Burmese activist and visiting fellow Dr Maung Zarni, Oxford professor Nicola Lacey and barrister Sir Geoffrey Nice QC.

further details about this event ...

 

 

6 June 2012

Launch of Regulatory Reform Forum

The LSE Law and Financial Markets Project and Herbert Smith are launching the Regulatory Reform Forum to bring together regulated institutions, policy makers, regulators, lawyers, trade bodies and academics. The objective will be to periodically review the progress of the reforms and to debate key issues arising from the design, implementation, and post-implementation, of the new regulatory structure. The group will meet on a periodic basis, and discussions are subject to Chatham House rules. If you would be interested in being a member of the Forum please contact Prof Julia Black: j.black@lse.ac.uk

 

 

23 May 2012

New Papers in the Working Paper Series

We are delighted to announce the first issue of the LSE Law Department's Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series for 2012.

In this issue, Michael Zander (WP1/2012 ) traces the 25-year history of The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984; Jill Peay (WP2/2012) examines some of the core competencies that should underpin a test of unfitness to plead; Ian Roxan (WP3/2012 discusses how we should look at international tax policy in the face of the realities of globalisation; Roderick A. Macdonald (WP4/2012) asks whether the study of law will reclaim the central role that it played in the University a millennium ago and Robert Baldwin (WP5/2012) considers how the New Scholarship has emerged as an influential style of scholarly writing.

 

 

18 May 2012

Dr Scott's research on libel cited by High Court

Research into the past and possible future influence of Convention rights on English libel law undertaken by Professor Alastair Mullis (UEA) and Dr Andrew Scott was recently cited by Mr Justice Eady in Hunt v Times Newspapers Ltd [2012] EWHC 1220 (QB). The work was published as 'The Swing of the Pendulum: Reputation, Expression and the Recentering of English Libel Law' (2012) NILQ, 63(1), 27-58.

Elsewhere, Belfast-based investigative journalism unit, The Detail, has published a interview between Dr Scott and international media lawyer Paul Tweed. The interview ranged across such matters as the importance of reputation, privacy law, mediation and arbitration of publication disputes, injunctions and super-injunctions and the future prospects for media regulation.

A link to the judgment: http://www.bailii.org

A link to the interview: http://www.thedetail.tv
 

 

17 May 2012

Freedom of expression and the internet

Professor Andrew Murray has recently been in the media discussing privacy, freedom of expression and the internet. He is quoted in this BBC News Magazine article on children and internet pornography: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17826515 and a video featuring his contribution to a public debate on the Freedom of Expression and the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement can be found here: http://freespeechdebate.com/en/media/acta-the-internet-freedom-of-expression-privacy/.

 

17 May 2012

New Executive LLM Programme

The Law Department are delighted to announce that in the autumn of 2013 we will offer a new LLM programme, the Executive LLM. Students on the programme will study for the LLM by taking a set of intensive modules over a period of three to four years.

The Executive LLM is one of the most innovative and intellectually exciting of LLM programmes offered in Europe today. It makes available the highest quality post-graduate education, taught by many of the leading academics in the UK, to individuals in full time employment who are not in a position to take a year-long break from work. The programme is open to applicants who have had at least three years post-degree work experience in law. The programme offers modules in a broad range of fields including arbitration, human rights and international law, and corporate, commercial and financial law.

Applications for the programme will open In October 2012. Further information (and our E-Brochure) can be accessed at: http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/law/programmes/ellm/welcome.htm

 

11 May 2012

Professor Murray elected Fellow of Royal Society of Arts

Professor Andrew Murray has been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA). Fellows of the Royal Society of Arts are achievers and influencers who come from an extraordinary range of backgrounds and are committed to civic innovation and social progress. The RSA has been a cradle of enlightenment thinking and a force for social progress for over 250 years. Professor Murray said: “I believe RSA Fellowship will give me a unique opportunity to come into contact with like-minded people, allowing me better to pursue my own professional and research goals with stimulation and support. I would also like to have the chance to contribute in a particular way to the aims of the RSA by sharing my own ideas and skills in order to bring about positive mutual advantages. I would aim to engage with the RSA and other Fellows by forming new professional relationships with Fellows interested in creativity, copyright, reward and regulation, and to pursue new initiatives for the benefit of the Fellowship as a whole and the wider community."

 

11 May 2012

The Moot Court Room

LSE Student News has been featuring students' comments on some of the specialised learning facilities that can be found around the School. This week was the turn of the Law Department's own Moot Court Room:

Liza Smirnova in LSE's Moot CourtUndergraduate law student Liza Smirnova (pictured) explains why she finds the LSE’s Moot Court such a useful learning resource.

Being a law student, the Moot Court featured in my course from the very beginning. I started by participating in class moots but I was soon taken by the activity and went on to represent the School in external mooting competitions. On two occasions, the finals were held in LSE’s Moot Court and I know that, as hosts, we were extremely proud to have this facility. It provides the perfect environment for the ultimate legal activity.

The Moot Court allows students to experience what it is like to be advocates, stand up in front of a panel of judges and argue a case. There is no question that mooting could take place in any classroom, however having a designated Moot Court adds an enormous amount to one’s overall experience. And the brilliant thing about it is that anyone can make use of it.

I’m graduating this summer, but I have no doubt that the Moot Court will continue to be hugely appreciated by LSE students.

If you would like more information about the Moot Court, contact Bradley Barlow on 0207 955 7687 or email b.barlow@lse.ac.uk.
 

11 May 2012

Success of the LSE Vis Arbitration Team

LSE has, once again, been very successful in the Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot. A record total of 280 teams from 67 countries competed in the nineteenth year of the competition. The LSE team entered the final rounds of the competition, after having been ranked 29th following the four preliminary rounds. It won a coveted Honourable Mention for both their claimant and respondent memoranda and team member Sonja Pavic received an Honourable Mention for her excellent pleadings. The Team was coached by the Vis Moot veterans Ugljesa Grusic (LSE PhD candidate), Aashni Dalal (LSE LLB 2010) and Manuel Penadés (LSE LLM 2009). The Law Department congratulates the Vis Team for its excellent performance!

 

 

10 May 2012

Helen Reece on Sky News

Helen Reece appeared on Sky news this morning, explaining the difference between civil partnership and marriage, in the light of US President Barack Obama's comments.
 

 

4 May 2012

NEW BOOK: Forms liberate: Reclaiming the jurisprudence of Lon L. Fuller

Kristen Rundle's new book on the jurisprudence of Lon L. Fuller has just been published by Hart Publishing. Lon L. Fuller’s account of what he termed ‘the internal morality of law’ is widely accepted as the classic twentieth century statement of the principles of the rule of law. Much less accepted is his claim that a necessary connection between law and morality manifests in these principles, with the result that his jurisprudence largely continues to occupy a marginal place in the field of legal philosophy. In Forms Liberate: Reclaiming the Jurisprudence of Lon L. Fuller, Kristen Rundle offers a close textual analysis of Fuller’s published writings and working papers to explain how his claims about the internal morality of law belong to a wider exploration of the ways in which the distinctive form of law introduces meaningful limits to lawgiving power through its connection to human agency. By reading Fuller on his own terms, Forms Liberate demonstrates why his challenge to a purely instrumental conception of law remains salient for twenty-first century legal scholarship.

 

 

2 May 2012

NEW BOOK: The Insecurity State: Vulnerable Autonomy and the Right to Security in the Criminal Law

In his new book, The Insecurity State (OUP, 2012), Peter Ramsay argues that much of the criminal legislation of recent decades seeks to protect a right to security. Security interests have been protected not only with new terrorism offences but also with new offences in anti-social behaviour, electronic media, child care, fraud and financial transactions. Through a detailed analysis of the law and policy of the notorious anti-social behavior order, the source of these new laws is traced to the political theories that have informed the policies of all mainstream political parties since the 1980s. These theories regard the autonomy of the law's normal subjects as vulnerable to others’ indifference and hostility. The resulting right to security serves as a substitute for defunct traditional sources of moral order and is implicitly recognised as a fundamental right by the ECHR. Finally, he argues that protecting a right to security by founding the criminal law's claim to legitimacy on the vulnerability of its normal subjects to fear is evidence of the British state's loss of sovereign authority.

 

2 May 2012

Jaqueline Suter Prize for the Best Doctoral Thesis in European Law

Congratulations to Dr Sacha Garben, LSE Fellow, whose PhD thesis 'The Bologna Process and Harmonization by Stealth' has won the Jaqueline Suter Prize for the Best Doctoral Thesis in European Law 2009-2011, awarded by the European University Institute and sponsored by the European Court of Justice. She will receive the award on 15th June at the European University Institute.

 

30 March 2012

Workshop on Europe and Higher Education

LSE hosted a workshop on 'Europe's Crisis, Higher Education's Chance: Reframing the Integration Issue in the Europe of Knowledge' on Friday 23 March, organised by Dr Anne Corbett (European Institute) and Dr Sacha Garben (Law). The event included former education minister Baroness Blackstone talking about her role in the Bologna Declaration and was featured in the Times Higher Education Supplement.

 

 

30 March 2012

Joint Committee cites evidence submitted by Dr Scott

Evidence submitted by Dr Andrew Scott has been cited by the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Privacy and Injunctions in its final report. The evidence concerned the definition of the public interest, the prevalence of injunctions, and the question of whether prior notification should be given by publishers to the subjects of their stories.

 

30 March 2012

Professor Gearty named in Top 100 Lawyers

Professor Conor Gearty (pictured), professor of human rights law in LSE’s Department of Law, has been named as one of the most influential 100 lawyers in society, in a list compiled by The Times. The list was put together by a team of 12 judges whose expertise spanned politics, the judiciary, academia, the media and, of course, the law. Lawyers who had worked on ground-breaking cases or were considered influential beyond their area of practice were more likely to win a place in the top 100, rather than lawyers who, while outstanding in their field, were simply doing their job. Professor Gearty said: 'It is clear they are not hacking my phone or they would know how wrong they are.'

For more information, visit www.thetimes.co.uk/law100 [nb. Times paywall]
 

28 March 2012

Professor Chinkin discusses gender and human rights in Argentina

Professor Christine Chinkin recently visited Buenos Aires as Guest of the Public Defenders’ Office, Buenos Aires and the British Embassy, Argentina to assist in a project on Strategic Litigation against Violence against Women. While there she gave lectures at the University of Buenos Aires Law School on ‘Gender and Human Rights’; to a Public Defenders’ workshop on ‘Access to Justice, Gender and Women’s Human Rights’; and to the Police Institute, Buenos Aires on ‘Policing and Women’s Human Rights’. She also gave two talks at the British Embassy in Buenos Aires on ‘Gender Stereotypes and Human Rights’.

 

20 March 2012

Graduate student Nicolas Lamp wins ASIL Lieber Prize

Congratulations for graduate student Nicolas Lamp, who has won the 2012 Lieber Prize. The Francis Lieber Prize is awarded annually by the American Society of International Law's Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict to the authors of publications which the judges consider to be outstanding in the field of law and armed conflict. Nicholas is current writing his thesis  'International Trade Lawmaking in the WTO' .For more about the prize, click here.

 

15 March 2012

Dr Beyani addresses UN Human Rights Council

Dr Chaloka BeyaniIn his capacity as UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons, Dr Chaloka Beyani addressed the United Nations Human Rights Council on Wednesday 7 March on the issue of internally displaced persons living outside camps.

Dr Beyani also shared with the Council his findings on the missions he undertook to the Maldives and Kenya last year. To read the findings, see Maldives and Kenya.

 

 

13 March 2012

Professor Jackson on right-to-die case

Professor Emily Jackson is quoted in the New Zealand Herald on the Tony Nicklinson High Court case, which will consider his request that a doctor be allowed to give him a lethal injection.

 

6 March 2012

LSE wins the UK Jessup Mooting Cup

An LSE mooting team has won the 2012 UK Jessup Cup. The team, consisting of Mashal Kadri (LLB), Soham Panchamiya (LLB), Rebecca Russell-Carroll (LLM), Zachariah Sammour (LLB) and Yik Boh Ting  (LLB), defeated Oxford’s team in finals that were presided over by the former FCO Legal Adviser, Sir Michael Wood. The competition addresses a fictional dispute before the International Court of Justice, raising several contentious issues of public international law, such as recognition of governments, use of force and responsibility of international organisations, destruction of cultural property during armed conflict and whether sovereign immunity should be upheld in face of serious violations of human rights.

 

The Phillip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition is the world's largest moot, with more than 500 law schools from 80 countries participating each year. The UK national competition took place on the 16-19 February at The Honourable Society of Gray's Inn in London. After four preliminary and three elimination rounds, the LSE team ranked first amongst the 17 UK universities participating this year. It is the first time that LSE has won the UK competition since 2005, and only the third time since the UK rounds were first held in 1973. The team will now travel to Washington, D.C. to participate in the White & Case International Rounds taking place on 25-31 March. The United Kingdom will also be represented by teams from Oxford (runners-up) and King's College London (3rd place).

 

5 March 2012

Visiting Professor Christopher Brummer

We are very pleased to welcome Professor Christopher Brummer of Georgetown University. He will be a Visiting Professor in the Department from 4–16 March, and will be taking part in the following events which will be co-hosted by Julia Black, David Kershaw and Niamh Moloney. Professor Brummer will be based in NAB6.12.

Wednesday 7th March, NAB 1.07; (8th Floor Reception follows).

Joint Law and Financial Markets Project and LLM Seminar Series Event:
‘The Architecture of International Financial Law’

Commentator: Julia Black; Chair: David Kershaw

 

Wednesday 15 March, 4-6pm; Con 1.04.

Seminar: ‘The Interaction of US and EU Financial Regulatory Regimes’ as part of European Monetary and Financial Services Law;

Chair: Niamh Moloney

 

5 March 2012

Professor Moloney appointed to Financial Services Authority Consumer Panel

Professor Niamh Moloney has been appointed to the Financial Services Authority's advisory Consumer Panel. The Consumer Panel is a statutory body set up under the Financial Services and Markets Act which advises the FSA on the interests and concerns of consumers and reports on the FSA's performance in meeting its objectives. The accompanying Press Release is at http://www.fs-cp.org.uk/newsroom/2012/199.shtml. The Panel will advise the new Financial Conduct Authority following the planned reorganization of the FSA in 2013

 

29 February 2012

Dr Beyani and Dr Humphreys speak at the UN

Stephen Humphreys and Chaloka Beyani both spoke at the UN headquarters in Geneva on Thursday, February 23, as part of a seminar on the impact of climate change on human rights. The seminar was held in pursuance of UN Human Rights Council Resolution 18/22 of October 17, 2011. Details of the seminar and the wider process are available here.

 

29 February 2012

Visiting Professor Klaus Günther

We are very pleased to welcome Professor Klaus Günther, of the Goethe-Universität. He will be a Visiting Professor in the department from 3rd – 18th March, and will be taking part in the following events which will be co-hosted by Anne Barron and Peter Ramsay.

'Where is the Third in Legal Pluralism?'
Legal and Political Theory Forum,
Wednesday March 7, 2012, 17.30-19.30, Moot Court Room.

'Justifying Criminal Law by a "Responsibility to Protect"?'
LLM Specialist Seminar (Criminology and Criminal Justice series),
Tuesday, March 13, 18.00-19.30, Room 3.04, Clement House.
 

 

28 February 2012

NEW BOOK: Relocating the Law of Geographical Indications

Dev Gangjee's new book Relocating the Law of Geographical Indications is published by Cambridge University Press. There is considerable variation in the nature, scope and institutional forms of legal protection for valuable geographical brands such as Champagne, Colombian coffee and Darjeeling tea. While regional products are increasingly important for producers, consumers and policy makers, the international legal regime under the TRIPs Agreement remains unclear.
   Adopting a historical approach, Dev Gangjee explores the rules regulating these valuable geographical designations within international intellectual property law. He traces the emergence of geographical indications as a distinct category while investigating the key distinguishing feature of the link between regional products and their places of origin. The research addresses longstanding puzzles, such as the multiplicity of regimes operating in this area; the recognition of the link between product and place and its current articulation in the TRIPS definition; the varying scope of protection; and the extent to which geographical indications ought to be treated as a category distinct from trade marks.

 

27 February 2012

Professor Murray on Pinterest.com and copyright infringement

Professor Andrew Murray is quoted in the Metro newspaper, which looks at the rise of the image-sharing site pinterest.com, discussing the copyright concerns of sharing content which users do not own.

 

23 February 2012

Professor Fisher QC suggests criminal offence for irresponsible banking

In an article published in today's Times, Professor Jonathan Fisher QC argues for amending the law to introduce criminal liability for bankers who take 'unconscionable risks with other people's money'.

 

23 February 2012

Professor Jackson on sex selection abortion

Professor Emily Jackson is quoted in today's Daily Telegraph article on the legal background to the newspaper's investigation on the termination of pregnancies on the grounds of gender.

read the Telegraph article in full

 

20 February 2012

Visiting Professor Pasquale Pasquino

We are very pleased to welcome Professor Pasquale Pasquino, Global Distinguished Professor of Law and Politics at NYU and Director of Research at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (Paris), who will a Visiting Professor in the department until 4 March. Prof Pasquino’s research ranges widely over the fields of political theory, the history of political thought, comparative constitutional law and deliberative democracy. During his visit to the Department, he will be staying in NAB 6.12. He is keen to meet members of staff and research students, so please feel free to drop in to meet him.

As well as engaging with doctoral and LLM students, Professor Pasquino will be taking part in the following events:

  • Tuesday 28 February @ 5-7pm (Moot Court Room) – LSE Legal & Political Theory Forum: Seminar on the rule of law (more details to follow)

  • Thursday 1 March @ 6.30-8pm (New Theatre) – Department of Law Public Lecture: ‘Why Germany is the Real Heir to the Old English Constitution
     

6 February 2012

Visiting Professor Roderick Macdonald

The department is very pleased to welcome Visiting Professor Roderick Macdonald of McGill University.

On Tuesday 7 February, 18.30-20.00, he will be giving a lecture entitled ‘Does Law Have a Place in the Modern University?’ in the New Theatre, East Building.

On Monday 13 February, 17.00-18.30, he will be giving a seminar entitled ‘Commissions of Inquiry as Public Policy’ in the Moot Court Room, to which staff and students are invited. Rod will be drawing on his experience with a number of Canadian and Quebec commissions of inquiry, including his present role as one of three commissioners investigating corruption within the Quebec construction industry.


 

30 January 2012

Prof Klug on David Cameron and human rights

Professorial Research Fellow Francesca Klug comments in the Guardian on Prime Minister David Cameron's call to change the European Court of Human Rights.

 

23 January 2012

Martti Koskenniemi – Visiting Professor

Professor Martti Koskenniemi, Professor of International Law and Director of the Erik Castrén Institute at the University of Helsinki, will be a Visiting Professor in the Law Department from 23rd January – 5th February, and will be giving the following lectures/seminars:

Friday 27 January 2012  |   6.30pm – 8pm  |   Venue: NAB1.04 (New Academic Building)

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW PROJECT

'The Fate of Human Rights in the 21st Century'

A dialogue between David Cole (Georgetown University Law Center & Martti Koskenniemi (University of Helsinki & LSE Visiting Professor)

Chair: Professor Susan Marks (LSE Law Department)


Thursday 2 February 2012   |   1-2 pm  |  Venue: NAB 2.06

Public International Law Graduate Seminar:

Martti Koskenniemi in conversation with Susan Marks

In addition, on Friday 3 February at 6.30 pm SOAS will be hosting a discussion by Professor Koskenniemi and Jacques Vergès on the theme of ‘International Justice: Between Impunity and Show Trials’. This is a ticketed event; those wishing to register should visit www.soas.ac.uk/international-justice.

Further details about Professor Koskenniemi may be obtained here www.helsinki.fi/eci/Staff/Koskenniemi.html


 

17 January 2012

LSE researchers to advise European Commission on Company Law

Three members of LSE's Law Department, Dr Carsten Gerner-Beurle, Dr Philipp Paech and Edmund-Philipp Schuster have recently been awarded a contract to report to the European Commission on issues regarding directors' duties and liabilities.

The comparative study will analyse the current state of the law applicable to directors' duties and liabilities in all 27 EU member states. It will be used by the Commission as a basis to decide on possible future harmonisation in this area of law.

 

13 January 2012

Prof Moloney made Trustee of Academy of European Law

Professor Niamh Moloney has been appointed to the Board of Trustees of the Academy of European Law (ERA). ERA, which is based in Brussels and Trier, is a non-profit public foundation which was established on the initiative of the European Parliament and is supported by the EU and its Member States, and provides training in European law to judges, lawyers, and other legal practitioners.

 

10 January 2012

Prof Black and Prof Moloney cited by Financial Services Bill Select Committee

Professors Julia Black and Niamh Moloney were both cited in the December 2011 Report by the UK Parliament’s Joint Select Committee on the Draft Financial Services Bill. The Committee’s Report examines and suggests revisions to the Financial Services Bill which is currently going through Parliament. The Bill proposes a new institutional structure for the regulation and supervision of the UK financial market in response to the financial crisis.

10 January 2012

Dr Murkens on Scottish devolution debate

Dr Jo Murkens is quoted in today's Daily Mail on Scottish devolution and the euro. Dr Murkens comments: 'Continued membership would only be possible with the approval of all 27 member states ... An independent Scotland would have to join the EU as a new accession state, which could take years ... All the new member states are legally obliged to adopt the euro at some future point'.

 

9 January 2012

Professor Murray gives expert evidence in new privacy law case

Professor Andrew Murray gave expert evidence to the Technology and Construction Court in the recent case of AMP v Persons Unknown [2011] EWHC 3454 (TCC). The case is take a groundbreaking approach to protecting the privacy of individuals online by awarding an order under the Protection of Harassment Act 1997 to prevent the further sharing of intimate photographs of the applicant via the BitTorrent system. Professor Murray worked closely with counsel for the applicant Matthew Richardson in the application, with Professor Murray providing the court with vital information on the functioning of the BitTorrent system.

The decision may be accessed at - http://www.scribd.com/doc/76130846/AMP-v-Persons-Unknown A commentary on the decision is on Professor Murray’s blog.
 

9 January 2012

Prof Chinkin becomes member of the Council of the Human Rights Institute of the IBA

Christine Chinkin has been invited to become a member of the Council of the Human Rights Institute, of the International Bar Association. She is participating in a fact finding mission of the International Bar Association’s Human Rights Institute to assess the state of the rule of law, with a specific focus on the independence of the judiciary and the legal profession, in Malawi.

 

9 January 2012

NEW BOOK: European Communications Law and Technological Convergence.

This book presents a critical examination of the European regulatory reaction to technological convergence, tracing the explicit and implicit mechanisms through which emerging concerns are incorporated into regulation. It seeks to identify the patterns that underlie these responses to determine the extent to which the issues at stake, and the implications of intervention, are fully understood and considered by authorities. The focus of the analysis is placed on ‘conflict points’ – areas of overlap between regimes – the study of which has been largely neglected. The PhD thesis on which this monograph is based was awarded the 2011 Jacques Lassier Prize.

 

3 January 2012

Prof Conor Gearty: 'Is Attacking Multi-culturalism a way of tackling racism - or feeding it?'

Professor Conor Gearty will give the Annual Lord Irvine Lecture at the Human Rights Centre, Durham University on 20 January 2012. For more information, please follow this link.

 

20 December 2011

Professor Klug on a Bill of Rights for the UK

Professorial Research Fellow Francesca Klug recently  discussed with barrister Dr Austen Morgan (33 Bedford Row) the question of a Bill of Rights for the UK, in a LexisNexis interview published on 7 December 2011.

 

2 December 2011

Professor Murray at Parliamentary Committee on Privacy and Injunctions

Andrew Murray, Professor of Law, appeared before the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Privacy and Injunctions on Monday 28 November, where he answered questions about the enforceability of UK injunctions against accounts held on offshore micro blogging and social networking platforms such as Twitter, and was asked by the Committee to outline how the UK Parliament and Courts could protect the identity of UK citizens subject to Privacy Injunctions following the CTB case of April/May 2011.

 

21 November 2011

Professor Fisher QC criticises priorities of HM Revenue & Customs

Professor Jonathan Fisher QC has published an article in the Times (17/11/11) in which he argues that HM Revenue & Customs treats honest taxpayers unfairly at the expense of the dishonest, and  call for changes to be made at the top of the organisation. He describes the recent tax treaty between the UK and Switzerland as 'a new low' which will allow criminals to continue their activities under a cloak of anonymity, whilst paying 'an annual protection fee' to the HMRC. He describes the Revenue's current approach as 'muddled, inconsistent and unfair'.

 

16 November 2011

Lord Millett at the LSE

On November 11 the LSE's Law and Financial Markets Project hosted 'Lord Millett's Contribution to Equity and the Common Law'. The event was attended by Lord Millett himself as well as Mr Justice Michael Briggs, Mr Justice David Richards and Mr Justice Guy Newey. The seminar was designed to bring together academics and practitioners to critically engage with Lord Millett's influential judgments in the fields of equity and trusts and company law. The event was chaired by Professor Sarah Worthington (Cambridge) and speakers included Mr Justice Newey, Clare Stanley (Wilberforce Chambers), Mary Stokes (Erskine Chambers), Professor Lionel Smith (McGill University), Dr Charlie Webb (LSE) and Professor David Kershaw (LSE). Following comments from the speakers in each session Lord Millett gave his response following by extremely lively comments from seminar participants.
 

 

15 November 2011

Prof Baldwin comments on phone hacking in Bloomberg Businessweek

Professor Robert Baldwin comments on the News Corporation phone hacking scandal and the likely results of the judicial inquiry.

 

 

11 November 2011

Dr Kleinheisterkamp on Korean debate on investor-state dispute settlement with US

Jan Kleinheisterkamp was interviewed on 2 November on TBS Primetime in South Korea on the investor-state dispute settlement mechanism in the US-Korean Free Trade Agreement (KORUS) which is causing highly controversial debates in Korea. The provisions negotiated in 2007 by the previous Korean government are now the main cause of objection by the new government against the ratification of KORUS, which had also met stiff resistance – albeit on other points – in the US Congress and thus required renegotiation in 2010. The growing concerns in various countries and the need for “Rethinking Investment Treaty Law” has already been the topic of a workshop of the LSE Transnational Law Project last May, the recording of which is available here.

 

10 November 2011

Prof Blair appointed to EU regulators

Visiting Professor William Blair QC high court judge and leading QC in banking law, has been appointed to the Joint Board of Appeal of the European Banking Authority, the European Securities and Markets Authority, and the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority. The three organisations were established in January this year to supervise financial services in the European Union.

 

1 November 2011

Dr Chaloka Beyani presents Climate Change Induced Displacement Report to UN

Dr Chaloka BeyaniDr Chaloka Beyani, Senior Lecturer in Law in the Law Department, presented his first report on Climate Change Induced Displacement to the General Assembly on 20th October 2011 in his capacity as United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons. On 15th September Dr Beyani delivered the first Nansen Lecture on ‘Migration, an Enduring Phenomenon’? at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. Before that he had delivered a keynote lecture on Migration Regimes at the 13th meeting of the Association for the Study of Forced Migration in Kampala on 3rd July 2011.

 

27 October 2011

Martin Lipton discusses Corporate Governance

In an event sponsored by Corporate Governance at the LSE and the Law and Financial Markets Project, on 19 October Martin Lipton of Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz gave a talk at the LSE entitled On Corporate Governance: A View from the US. Professor David Kershaw of the Law Department was the responding commentator. In a wide ranging talk Mr Lipton discussed his pioneering role in the development of takeover defences in the United States and his views of the role of the corporation and its relationship to shareholders and other stakeholders. He also discussed current developments in the United States including the early US experience with ‘say on pay’ and the lessons from the financial crisis on board composition. A lively debate followed with representatives of UK institutional shareholders, corporate law firms and regulators.

 

12 October 2011

Dr Andrew Scott appointed Inner Temple Academic Fellow

Four prominent legal academics have been appointed Academic Fellows of the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple. Dr Andrew Scott (London School of Economics) joins  Dr Ronan McCrea (University College London), Joanna Miles (University of Cambridge), and Professor Christian Twigg-Flesner (University of Hull), all of whom have been selected to take up this prestigious three-year role.
    The Academic Fellows Scheme aims to recognise the outstanding contribution of legal teaching and research of early to mid-career academics to the Bar of England and Wales. It also aims to support their research and to build stronger ties between barristers and legal academics.
    The Chief Executive of the Inner Temple, Patrick Maddams, said:
    “We are delighted to welcome these four outstanding academics to the Inner Temple community. They will be joining some of the most prominent barristers, judges and international leaders today. Legal education has always been at the heart of the Inner Temple and we look forward to working with these new Academic Fellows as we further strengthen this role”.

 

7 October 2011

'Judicial Review : Human Rights and the Peril of Knowing Too Much'

Professor Conor Gearty will be presenting a plenary session at Judicial Review London : Trends and Forecasts on Thursday 13 October 2011.

 

 

4 October 2011Jan Kleinheisterkamp

Dr Kleinheisterkamp at UNCTAD expert meeting on the World Investment Report

Jan Kleinheisterkamp has been invited to participate in the Expert Group Meeting of the UN Conference on Trade and Development on 4-5 October 2011 to discuss the outlines of an Investment Policy Framework for Development that will be the feature of the next World Investment Report, one of UNCTAD’s flagship publications.
 

 

3 October 2011

Dr Scott comments on the Ferdinand privacy decision

Andrew Scott has published a note in the Guardian law section, commenting on the recent decision of the High Court in Ferdinand v MGN Ltd [2011] EWHC 2454 (QB). The judgment was delivered by Mr Justice Nicol, himself a former lecturer in the Department.

28 September 2011

Professor Chinkin moderates UN Human Rights Council debate

On 26 September Professor Christine Chinkin moderated the UN Human Rights Council's plenary debate on Integration of a gender perspective in the work of the Human Rights Council : Promoting gender equality as institutional practice.


 

26 September 2011

Pablo Ibáñez Colomo awarded the Jacques Lassier Prize

Pablo Ibáñez Colomo has been awarded the Jacques Lassier Prize by the International League of Competition Law. The Prize is awarded every two years for Ph.D. dissertations written in competition law and related fields (including intellectual property and unfair competition), and was established in memory of Jacques Lassier, a former President of the League and one of the first practitioners in continental Europe to understand the importance of EU competition rules. The ceremony took place at Christ Church College in Oxford during the annual congress of the League.

For more information about the prize, see http://ligue.org/lassier.php

 

 

16 September 2011

Dr Poole and Dr Webber cited by High Court of Australia

Australia's High Court has rendered its first decision on the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities Act (Victoria). The judgment in Momcilovic v The Queen [2011] HCA 34  (hyperlink: http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/cases/cth/HCA/2011/34.html) cites Dr Poole's 'The Reformation of English Administrative Law' (2009) 68 Cambridge Law Journal 142 and Dr Webber's 'Legal Reasoning and Bills of Rights' in Ekins (ed) Modern Challenges to the Rule of Law (2011). See text corresponding to footnotes 619, 622 and 623.

 

 

15 September 2011

Dr Stephen Humphreys at UN Human Rights Council

Dr Stephen Humphreys spoke yesterday at a high level side-event at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. Other panel participants included the President of the Maldives, Mohamad Nasheed, the former President of Ireland and High Commissioner for Human Rights, Mary Robinson, and the current Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, Kyung-Wha Kang. The meeting was organised by the Permanent Missions of Ireland and the Maldives to the UN. Dr Humphreys presented the summary and recommendations of a report drafted for the Geneva-based International Council on Human Rights Policy (ICHRP), entitled ‘Beyond Technology Transfer: Human Rights in a Climate-Constrained World’.  The report is available on the ICHRP website (www.ichrp.org).

[L to R: H.E. Iruthisnam Adam, Ambassador of the Republic of Maldives to the UN; H.E. Mr. Mohamed Nasheed, President of the Republic of Maldives; H.E. Mrs. Mary Robinson, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and former President of Ireland; Ms. Kyung-Wha Kang, UN Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights; Dr Stephen Humphreys, Lecturer at the London School of Economics; H.E. Mr. G. Corr, Ambassador of Ireland to the UN.]

 

 

14 September  2011

LSE tops Independent guide to studying law

The Independent newspaper provided a guide to studying Law last week, which noted LSE's pre-eminent position in the Complete University Guide, 2012. The article also quoted our Head of Department, Martin Loughlin: ""Law is the attempt to subject human conduct to the governance of rules. This highlights what is simple and complex about legal study. We are obliged to simplify a complex reality by conceiving all human relationships - husband-wife, landlord-tenant, employer- employee, citizen-government etc. - as orders of rules. This requires analytical skills in rule-handling. But it must never be forgotten that we are dealing with human conduct. These analytical techniques can be effectively used only once we realize that 'the life of the law is not logic but experience'. Rules are simple, life is complex. Rules aspire to certainty, but life is uncertain. Rules provide stability, but life unsettles our expectations. The key to success? Only connect."

 

 

14 September 2011

NEW BOOK: World Trade Law after Neoliberalism : Reimagining the Global Economic Order

The rise of economic liberalism in the latter stages of the 20th century coincided with a fundamental transformation of international economic governance, especially through the law of the World Trade Organization. In this book, Andrew Lang provides a new account of this transformation, and considers its enduring implications for international law. Against the commonly-held idea that 'neoliberal' policy prescriptions were encoded into WTO law, Lang argues that the last decades of the 20th century saw a reinvention of the international trade regime, and a reconstitution of its internal structures of knowledge. In addition, the book explores the way that resistance to economic liberalism was expressed and articulated over the same period in other areas of international law, most prominently international human rights law. It considers the promise and limitations of this form of 'inter-regime' contestation, arguing that measures to ensure greater collaboration and cooperation between regimes may fail in their objectives if they are not accompanied by a simultaneous destabilization of each regime's structures of knowledge and characteristic features. With that in mind, the book contributes to a full and productive contestation of the nature and purpose of global economic governance.

 

 

 

6 September 2011

NEW BOOK: Policing, Popular Culture and Political Economy : Towards a Social Democratic Criminology 

Professor Robert Reiner has been one of the pioneers in the development of research on policing since the 1970s as well as a prolific writer on mass media and popular culture representations of crime and criminal justice. His work includes the renowned books The Politics of the Police and Law and Order: An Honest Citizen's Guide to Crime and Control, an analysis of the neo-liberal transformation of crime and criminal justice in recent decades. This volume brings together many of Reiner's most important essays on the police written over the last four decades as well as selected essays on mass media and on the neo-liberal transformation of crime and criminal justice. All the work included in this important volume is underpinned by a framework of analysis in terms of political economy and a commitment to the ethics and politics of social democracy.

 

 

6 September 2011

Professor Klug calls for consistency on human rights

Professorial Research Fellow Francesca Klug writes to the Guardian noting that 'We cannot insist other regimes comply with international human rights standards while seeking their extraction from our law.'

 

 

9 August 2011

New Papers in the Working Paper Series

We are delighted to announce the second issue of the LSE Law Department's Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series for 2011. 

In this issue, Michael A. Wilkinson (WP5/2011) considers the juridical implications of Hannah Arendt’s conception of freedom; David Kershaw (WP6/2011) examines the drivers of legal evolution in contemporary corporate law; Jan Kleinheisterkamp (WP7/2011) outlines the problems of compatibility of the Bilateral Investment Treaties and the Energy Charter Treaty with EU law; and Yaraslau Kryvoi (WP8/2011) provides an analysis of the legal regime governing counterclaims in investor-state disputes.

 

 

2 August 2011

Professor Fisher QC puts forward fraud proposals

Jonathan Fisher QCA paper recently co-authored by Professor Jonathan Fisher QC with three of his students, Claire Cregan, James Di Giulio and Jodi Schutze, was discussed in yesterday's Financial Times. The paper examines three paradigm cases which emerged during the course of the global financial crisis, and considers whether the parameters of criminal law are sufficiently wide to capture the conduct of financial markets participants who have acted recklessly. It argues that regulators should force investment banks and credit-rating agencies to disclose conflicts of interest to counterparties and clients, with a failure to do so triggering a breach of the fraud act.

 

 

26 July 2011

Professor Loughlin elected Fellow of the British Academy

Professor Martin LoughlinCongratulations to our current Head of Department, Professor Martin Loughlin, who was elected a Fellow of the British Academy, at the  Academy's Annual General Meeting on 21 July. Professor Loughlin is the LSE Professor of Public Law. He serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including The Modern Law Review, Jus Politicum and Giornale di Storia costituzionale, and is co-editor of the OUP book series, Oxford Constitutional Theory. His most recent book is Foundations of Public Law (2010) and his main areas of research and teaching are in constitutional and administrative law, constitutional theory and legal and political thought. The British Academy was established by Royal Charter in 1902. It is an independent, self-governing fellowship of scholars elected for their distinction and achievement,  that champions and supports the humanities and social sciences.

 

26 July 2011

Professor Chinkin receives honorary doctorate at University of Nottingham

Congratulations to Christine Chinkin, Professor of International Law at the LSE and William W. Cook Global Professor of Law at the University of Michigan, who has been awarded an honorary doctorate in law at the University of Nottingham. The degree was conferred by the Vice-Chancellor of the University, Professor David Greenaway, on the afternoon of Wednesday, 13 July 2011, with Professor Dino Kritsiotis of the School of Law giving the public oration. Professor Chinkin’s many works include Third Parties and International Law (Clarendon Press, 1993), The Boundaries of International Law: A Feminist Analysis (Manchester University Press) (with Hilary Charlesworth) and The Making of International Law (Oxford University Press, 2007) (with Alan E. Boyle). Professor Kritsiotis emphasised that “no greater intellectual debt” was owed by international law to Professor Chinkin than the work she had undertaken on the shortcomings of the law in respect of women throughout the world: “the articulation of a feminist audit and critique of the international legal order has presented as much a manifesto for law reform as it has a new way of seeing and thinking about the incredibly diverse world in which we all live”. Professor Kritsiotis also mentioned Professor Chinkin’s involvement in the Women’s International War Crimes Tribunal for the Trial of Japanese Military Sexual Slavery and, more recently, in the Goldstone Commission on the Gaza Conflict of 2008–2009. He ended the oration by saying that “through these and through other engagements, Professor Chinkin has shown that international law can have a life—that international law must have a life—beyond its basic bureaucracies, one that affects very much for the better the lives of others.”

 

26 July 2011

Dr Micheler and Dr Paech present issues of securities law at a workshop of the ECON Committee of the European Parliament

The ECON Committee of the European Parliament and its rapporteur for Securities Law, Mr Othmar Karas have drawn on specialist knowledge of Dr Eva Micheler and Dr Philipp Paech at a recent workshop held at the European Parliament in Brussels. Both Eva and Philipp are amongst the leading specialists for legal implications of cross-jurisdictional holding of securities. The panel comprised four eminent experts in addition to Eva and Philipp, notably from Switzerland, the US, France and Spain. The panel’s task was to give their view in relation to the need for harmonisation of the law regarding securities holdings in the EU, and the Geneva and Hague Securities Conventions, with a view to prepare the ECON Committee for upcoming legislative proposals to be submitted by the Commission. The proceedings are available at http://www.europarl.europa.eu/activities/committees/studies.do?language=EN

 

 

26 July 2011

Professor Michael Zander, QC and Legal Aid

Michael Zander, QC, Emeritus Professor, was one of the co-signatories of a letter to the Times on 19 July, urging the Government to amend clause 12 of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill. As it stands, the bill empowers the Government to introduce means and merit testing for legal advice and assistance to suspects being held at a police station and the authors feel that restricting the right to free legal advice to people when they at their most vulnerable is wrong.

 

 

26 July 2011

Dr Beyani, UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons

The LSE's Dr Chaloka Beyani, in his role as the UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons, has visited the Maldives to look at the impact of climate change on its population. Dr Beyani concludes: "Climate change is very real in the Maldives and its effects on rights, including the right to housing, safe water and livelihoods, are being felt on many islands, such as those which I visited during this trip. The suffering caused by coastal erosion, salination, rising sea levels, and more frequent storms and flooding are all too obvious to be ignored."

 

 

6 July 2011

Professor Gearty on progressive politics, and the war on terror

Professor Conor Gearty gave the Institute for Social Science Research's Annual Lecture - 'Human Rights - A new progressive politics, or just the same old Lawyers' stuff?' - on 21 June at South Bank University, and also the keynote lecture at the conference 'The War on Terror and the Impact on Muslim Communities : Security, Human Rights and Media', Brunel University, 28 June. 

 

 

6 July 2011

Professor Zander on the Today programme

Emeritus Professor Michael Zander QC appeared on BBC Radio 4's Today programme on 1 July, commenting on the Government's response to the legal difficulties surrounding the charging of murder suspect Paul Hookway. Professor Zander's opinion was also cited by the Guardian on 29 June.

 

 

22 June 2011

Dr Kleinheisterkamp invited as expert on investment treaty law by European Parliament

Jan KleinheisterkampDr Jan Kleinheisterkamp has been invited by the European Parliament’s Directorate General for External Policies to participate as one of three discussants in an “expert hub”, a forum for dialogue and debate between EP internal experts and the external think tank community, on “Future EU Investment Treaties - What kind of standards of protection and what kind of dispute settlement provisions should be in?” This appointment comes after Dr Kleinheisterkamp co-authored the LSE study “The EU Approach to International Investment Policy after the Lisbon Treaty” for the Parliament’s INTA Committee and subsequently advised the shadow rapporteurs of INTA as a legal expert in their first round of negotiations on the amendments to the draft Regulation on transitional arrangements for bilateral investment agreements between member states and third countries.

14 June 2011

Students' WTO Moot success

The Law Department would like to celebrate the success of this year’s WTO Law Moot team, who came 3rd overall in the international rounds of the ELSA WTO Moot, competing against the best teams from all over the world. The team, made up of LLM students Zila Milupi, Ada Siqueira and Amy Wan, impressed all with their great technical skill, argumentative dexterity, and warm team spirit, and thoroughly deserved their success. This was a tremendous achievement - congratulations!

The team writes of their experience:

‘Our participation in the ELSA Moot Court Competition on WTO Law was a very worthwhile experience, despite our fears about all the extra work that it would involve! The competition took us to parts of the world that we never would otherwise have had the opportunity to visit. We spent a week in Vilnius, Lithuania competing in the European Regional Rounds where we achieved second place and qualified to progress on to the Final Oral Rounds.

‘The Final Oral Rounds took place in Evian, France and Geneva, Switzerland. There, we faced the other top fifteen teams that represented universities from all over the world. After a very challenging week of mooting, we progressed to the semi-finals which were held at the WTO Headquarters. We emerged third place overall – an undoubtedly great reward for our hard work.

‘Through our participation in the competition, we acquired specialist knowledge in WTO law as it relates to food safety measures, which is something not many people can boast about! But our learning experience went far beyond just substantive knowledge of the law. We gained valuable insight into the operation of the WTO Dispute Settlement System which, with a strong emphasis on diplomacy, is much unlike any other legal experience. In addition, we were able to interact with professionals and leading academics in the field of WTO law who offered valuable career advice.

‘The competition gave us the privilege of representing the LSE on a highly regarded and prestigious platform. Of course our achievement in the competition was dependent on a lot of hard work, but it was nicely balanced with healthy doses of leisure. We learned a lot about ourselves and have come out of the competition as more than just teammates, but as good friends that survived a grilling from WTO academics, practitioners, and Appellate Body members. Going into the competition, we had no idea that learning could be such fun and that an extra pile of work could be as enriching as it was! We’d strongly recommend entering the competition to anyone who’s willing to put in the work, has a curious mind and is looking for an intellectual type of fun (trust us- this is not an oxymoron!)’

 

 

7 June 2011

Dr Paech briefs European Parliament ECON Committee

Dr Philipp Paech's briefing on ‘Cross-border Issues of Securities Law’ commissioned by the ECON Committee of the European Parliament has been published on the European Parliament’s website. The briefing was commissioned in view of prospected European legislation and provides the legal background understanding in respect of the law governing intermediated securities which is in between commercial-, insolvency- and property law. Dr Paech will present the findings of the briefing at the relevant ECON Committee hearing on 30 June. Dr Eva Micheler will also be presenting on UK and German/Austrian law.

 

 

Robert Reiner24 May 2011

Professor Reiner awarded British Society of Criminology Outstanding Achievement Award

Congratulations to Professor Robert Reiner who has been awarded the British Society of Criminology Outstanding Achievement Award 2011, reflecting his outstanding contribution to the discipline of Criminology. The award will be presented at the Society's conference in July.

 

 

 

17 May 2011

Professor Moloney appointed to ESMA Securities and Markets Stakeholder Panel

The Board of Supervisors of the European Securities and Markets Authority has appointed Professor Niamh Moloney to its Securities and Markets Stakeholder Panel. ESMA, established in January 2011, is the EU's new financial market regulator. The accompanying Press Release is at http://www.esma.europa.eu/

 

 

17 May 2011

Dr Scott’s work on privacy cited by High Court

Research on privacy law undertaken by Dr Andrew Scott and published recently in Doley and Mullis (eds) Carter Ruck on Libel and Privacy (6th ed, LexisNexis, 2010, paras 19.86 et seq) was cited by Eady J in CTB v News Group Newspapers Ltd and Imogen Thomas [2011] EWHC 1232 (QB). The point at issue concerned the question of when information can be said to have entered the public domain. It is especially pertinent in the context of publication on Twitter and other online platforms relative to the mainstream media.

 

 

17 May 2011

Anthea Roberts wins International Law prize for the second time

For the second time, Anthea Roberts has been awarded the Francis Deák Prize by the American Society of International Law.  The Francis Deák Prize is awarded annually to a young author for meritorious scholarship published in The American Journal of International Law. The prize was established in 1973 by Philip Cohen in memory of Francis Deák (former head of the international law program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and editor of American International Law Cases, 1783–1963) and is sponsored by Oxford University Press.
    Anthea was awarded the 2011 Deák Prize for her article "Power and Persuasion in Investment Treaty Interpretation: The Dual Role of States," 104 AJIL 179 (2010).  Anthea also received the 2002 Deák Prize for her article "Traditional and Modern Approaches to Customary International Law," 95 AJIL 757 (2001).

 

 

17 May 2011

Jan Paulsson and Anthea Roberts short-listed for International Dispute Resolution Article of the Year

Jan Paulsson and Anthea Roberts have both had articles short-listed for the OGEMID Award for International Dispute Resolution Article of the Year. OGEMID (Oil-Gas-Energy-Mining-Infrastructure Dispute Management) is a listserv that brings together most of the world's experienced professionals in the field of international dispute management, mainly arbitration, mediation, negotiation, with a particular emphasis on investment disputes. See http://www.transnational-dispute-management.com/ogemid/

Jan Paulsson was nominated for his article "Moral Hazard in International Dispute Resolution" (Inaugural Lecture as holder of Michael R. Klein Distinguished Scholar Chair, University of Miami School of Law, 29 April 2010). Anthea Roberts was nominated for her article "Power and Persuasion in Investment Treaty Interpretation: The Dual Role of States," 104 American Journal of International Law 179 (2010). 

 

 

10 May 2011

Dr Scott gives evidence to Joint Committee on Defamation

Dr Andrew Scott recently appeared before the Joint Committee on Defamation, and gave evidence on the draft Defamation Bill published recently for consultation by the Ministry of Justice. The evidence session also focused on the research reflected in Dr Scott’s paper (co-authored with Professor Alastair Mullis) on ‘Reframing Libel: taking (all) rights seriously and where it leads’.

A working paper version of ‘Reframing Libel’ is available here: http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/law/wps/WPS2010-20_MullisandScott.pdf

A video of the evidence session is available on the Parliament website, here: http://www.parliamentlive.tv/Main/Player.aspx?meetingId=8306

Dr Scott has also had a co-authored article regarding libel reform published recently by politics.co.uk.

 

 

10 May 2011

New Papers in the Working Paper Series

We are delighted to announce the first issue of the LSE Law Department's Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series for 2011. 

In this issue, Grégoire C. N. Webber (WP1/2011) considers how bills of rights challenge the rule of law; Joanne P. Braithwaite (WP2/2011) examines the complexities in implementing proposals to extend central counterparty clearing in the over-the-counter derivatives markets; Carsten Gerner-Beuerle, David Kershaw, and Matteo Solinas (WP3/2011) assess the significance or triviality of the adoption of a board neutrality rule in European Union Member States; and Jan Komárek (WP4/2011) examines what it means for a supreme court to ‘make law’.

 

 

3 May 2011

LSE Law Department best in UK

The Law Department has been judged the best in the country by the The Complete University Guide for 2012. See http://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/league-tables/rankings?s=Law for further details.

 

 

18 April 2011

LSE Team win London Universities Mooting Shield

On 10 March 2011, LSE became the Grand Champions of the London Universities Mooting Shield (LUMS) competition for the first time, breaking UCL’s three-year reign since the competition was developed in 2007. The Grand Final was held at Allen & Overy’s Bishop Square offices where LSE defeated Queen Mary.

The team comprised of second year LLB students Ahmed Alani, Ingram Cheung, Shi Min Lee and Yik Boh Ting. The moot problem was an appeal before the Supreme Court on the validity of an Order-in-Council that required the DPP’s consent before an arrest warrant could be issued to prosecute those suspected of war crimes and crimes against humanity. The judging panel comprised of senior representatives from each of the competition’s prominent sponsors.

LSE competed in the nine-round league competition since October 2010 with a round held every fortnight, and was top of the league table by the fourth round, a position it retained throughout the duration of the competition. During the competition league, LSE competed against KCL, UCL, University of Westminster, Birkbeck College, University of Hertfordshire, SOAS, City University London and London South Bank University. It was a rewarding experience for the team members especially as two rounds were held in the Royal Courts of Justice (Round 5) and the Supreme Court where the team was judged by Lord Dyson (Round 9).

Many congratulations to the team!
 

 

17 April 2011

Goldstone's colleagues break silence to stand by UN report on Gaza war atrocities

Three members of the UN fact-finding team on the Gaza war of 2008-9 - human rights lawyer Hina Jilali, LSE professor of International Law Christine Chinkin and former Irish peacekeeper Desmond Travers - are insinuating that the mission’s fourth member, and chair, Richard Goldstone, is casting doubt on the credibility of their report via misrepresentation of facts.

 

 

5 April 2011

LSE Wins 2011 Oxford International Intellectual Property Moot

Congratulations to LSE mooters Adam Burk (LLB ’12), Tor Tarantola (MSc ‘11, Social & Cultural Psychology), and Ling Yah Wong (LLB ’12) have won the 2011 Oxford International Intellectual Property Moot. The competition was held at St. Catherine’s College, Oxford, on 18-19 March. Twenty-two shortlisted teams were invited to take place in the oral round based on the best written submissions, which were selected by lawyers at Bird & Bird. Teams from India, Singapore, Australia, Canada, France, the United States, and the UK took part.
    The team each spent about one hundred hours in total preparing their written submissions and refining their oral arguments. They met between three and six hours each week in the Lent term, and about ten hours per week as the competition approached.
    Burk, Tarantola, and Wong, none of whom had any prior mooting experience, acknowledged the support they received from both faculty and students at the Law Department. Dr Dev Gangjee, the team’s adviser, and Dr Siva Thambisetty were both “enormously helpful,” said Burk.
    The team also acknowledged the Law Society’s moot training programme, as well as the students who provided advice and feedback: Aleks Bojovic (PhD candidate), Chase Kvasnak (LLB ’11), Erik Lindemann (LLM ’11), Jacqueline Park (LLB ’10, LLM ’11), Hiroaki Tanaka, and Art Ward (LLM ’10).
    “There are a number of very successful, experienced mooters at LSE, and their feedback was invaluable,” said Tarantola. “Everyone at LSE held us to a very high standard, and it paid off.”

 

29 March 2011

Fewer police does not mean Christmas for criminals

Robert Reiner writes in the Guardian about the effect of cutting police budgets.

 

29 March 2011

'Intangibles: Immaterial Vectors, Agents, and Effects'

Reader in Law Alain Pottage will be one of the participants at this Harvard Conference, co-sponsored by the London School of Economics. See the Humanities Center at Harvard for further information.

 

 

 

23 March 2011

British Institute of Human Rights Conference

Professorial Research Fellow Francesca Klug will be chairing the morning session of the BIHR Annual Conference 2011 on 29 March 2011. For further information about the conference, please click here.

 

21 March 2011

Professor Jonathan Fisher QC appointed to serve on Bill of Rights Commission 

Jonathan Fisher QCVisiting Professor Jonathan Fisher QC has been appointed by the Ministry of Justice to serve as a Commissioner on the Bill of Rights Commission. [1]
    In May 2010 the Coalition Government’s Programme for Action undertook to “establish a Commission to investigate the creation of a British Bill of Rights that incorporates and builds on all our obligations under the European Convention on Human Rights, ensures that these rights continue to be enshrined in British law, and protects and extends British liberties”.[2]
    In addition to his principal areas of practice and academic interest (business crime; proceeds of crime: money laundering, restraint, confiscation, civil recovery; fraud and contentious tax cases), Jonathan Fisher QC is extremely familiar with human rights law and civil liberties. In 2006 he gave evidence to the House of Common’s Select Committee on Constitutional Affairs[3] following publication of his pamphlet entitled “A British Bill of Rights and Obligations”.[4]
 

 

21 March 2011

Dr Beyani addresses the UN Human Rights Council

Dr Chaloka BeyaniDr Chaloka Beyani (pictured), senior lecturer in law in the Department of Law, addressed the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva on Monday 7 March in his capacity as special rapporteur on the human rights of internally displaced persons.
     He drew attention to climate induced displacement, internally displaced women, the protection of internally displaced persons in camps and settlements, and strengthening the international framework for protecting and assisting internally displaced persons.
    Dr Beyani also spoke at a side event opened by the high commissioner for human rights, Dr Pillay, on Wednesday 9 March, together with the former holders of his mandate, Dr Francis Deng and Professor Walter Kalinin.

 

15 March 2011

Professor Gearty on BBC Radio 4

Professor Conor Gearty appeared on this week's edition of Analysis on BBC Radio 4, to discuss David Cameron’s comments on multiculturalism and ‘muscular liberalism’.

 

 

Information Technology Law - cover8 March 2011

Andrew Murray's Information Technology Law podcasts

Reader in Law Andrew Murray discusses subjects tackled in his latest book Information Technology Law : The Law and Society (Oxford University Press : 2010) in a series of podcasts, available free via Itunes

 

2 March 2011

Professor Hartley gives evidence to European Scrutiny Committee

Professor Trevor Hartley recently appeared before the UK Parliament's European Scrutiny Committee, where he gave evidence on the impact of EU law on the sovereignty of the United Kingdom and the supremacy of the British Parliament.

 

2 March 2011

Dr Margot Salomon briefs OHCHR meeting

Dr Margot Salomon was recently invited by Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung to join the High Commissioner for Human Rights, in an expert meeting held in Berlin on 24-25 February 2011. The meeting was convened to mark the 25th anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Right to Development and to examine its future conceptual and practical contribution to advancing human rights globally. Dr Salomon was requested to provide a background note to inform discussions that brought together academics, the OHCHR Secretariat, and diplomats for this invitation only workshop.

 

2 March 2011

Dr Veerle Heyvaert introduces Transnational Environmental Law (TEL)

Veerle HeyvaertDr Veerle Heyvaert is delighted to announce the forthcoming publication of Transnational Environmental Law (TEL), a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the development of new ideas on law’s contribution to environmental governance in a global context. TEL will be published by Cambridge University Press and is due to release its first issue in 2012. The online version is scheduled to go live early in the year, and the first hard copies will reach the shelves in April 2012. Dr Heyvaert developed the idea for the journal in collaboration with Mr Thijs Etty (VU University, Amsterdam). Together, they will assume editorship of TEL.

The short text below gives a brief overview of TEL's mission and scope. For further information, please contact Veerle Heyvaert at v.heyvaert@lse.ac.uk. Dr Heyvaert also warmly welcomes expressions of interest for article submissions and other contributions to the inaugural issues of TEL, and will happily field any further queries.

Transnational Environmental Law (TEL) is a peer-reviewed journal for the study of environmental law and governance beyond the state. It approaches legal and regulatory developments with an interest in the contribution of non-state actors and an awareness of the multi-level governance context in which contemporary environmental law unfolds.

TEL offers a forum for rigorous analysis and discussion of the impacts of globalization on complex environmental risks and norms. It welcomes scholarship that enriches our understanding of contemporary environmental law through comparative and cutting-edge interdisciplinary analysis. TEL’s scope is broadly conceived in terms of disciplinary focus: its pages are open to scholarly contributions covering a wide range of environmental issues, including climate change, biodiversity, emerging technologies, industrial pollution and waste management. TEL also promotes the exploration of the evolving dynamics between environmental law and other legal disciplines (including but not limited to trade and competition law, financial law, and human rights).

TEL is strongly committed to supporting environmental legal scholarship across geographical boundaries and generations; it warmly encourages participation by young and emerging talents from across the globe. TEL seeks to foster innovative synergies between different scholarly styles and traditions, and strives for the development of a new generation of environmental scholarship that will bridge existing divides, including notably the divide between North American and European approaches to environmental law scholarship. In the same spirit, TEL encourages the integration of theoretical and practical legal perspectives on current environmental issues, and aims to deliver scholarship of high salience to academics and practitioners alike.

 

1 March 2011

'Norwich Pharmacal orders' and Internet piracy

LSE IT law specialist, Andrew Murray, is quoted in the Lawyer in an article considering the impact of a recent judgment  (Media CAT Ltd v Adams & Ors) on peer-to-peer copyright infringement cases.

 

 

16 February 2011

Helen Reece on sex offenders Supreme Court ruling

Reader in Law Helen Reece appeared on Sky News today commenting on the government implementation of last year's Supreme Court ruling on the right of review of the sex offenders' life long requirement to report regularly to the police.

 

 

15 February 2011

Andrew Scott in the media:
Tweeting in court; Injunctions in privacy cases; misuse of libel law; competition in audit markets

Andrew ScottDr Andrew Scott recently discussed the use of Twitter in court on Deutsche Welle World radio in light of the Wikileaks extradition case and the consultation launched by Lord Judge. He has also published a note on injunctions in privacy cases in Prospect magazine, commented on the misuse of libel law to 'chill' free expression on Inforrm and in Media Lawyer, and was interviewed by Accountancy Age with regard to the state of competition in audit markets.

 

15 February 2011

Prisoners and the right to vote

Professorial Research Fellow Francesca Klug comments on prisoners and the right to vote in the Guardian.

 

8 February 2011

Rape-law reforms are poisoning relationships

A recent case in England highlighted the dangers of turning bad teenage sex into a criminal matter ... an article in Spiked by Helen Reece.

 

8 February 2011

NEW BOOK: Theatre of the Rule of Law

Dr Stephen Humphreys will be talking about his new book, Theatre of the Rule of Law at University California Irvine in Los Angeles  on Thursday 10 February (click on the flyer, right, for more details); and also on Thursday 24 February at New College, Oxford. Theatre of the Rule of Law presents the first sustained critique of rule of law promotion – the push to shape laws and institutions that pervades international development and post-conflict reconstruction policy today.

 

 

8 February 2011

NEW BOOK: Terrorism and International Law: Accountability, Remedies, and Reform A Report of the IBA Task Force on Terrorism

Elizabeth Stubbins Bates' latest book, Terrorism and International Law: Accountability, Remedies, and Reform A Report of the IBA Task Force on Terrorism (Oxfrod University Press, 2011) was completed whilst she was a Visiting Fellow in the Law Department in 2010. It examines the developments in international law and practice in a dynamic and often controversial area. Written by Elizabeth Stubbins Bates and edited by a Task Force of world famous jurists chaired by Justice Richard Goldstone, the book analyses the operation and application of international law to terrorism and outlines recommendations for reform. This title covers developments in the counter-terrorism policies and practice of individual states and international and regional organizations. It examines the framework of derogations and national security limitations in international human rights law, as well as clarifying when international humanitarian law applies to terrorism and counter-terrorism. This title provides a global overview of counter-terrorism, including but not restricted to the US-led 'war on terror', by considering case law and examples of state practice from all continents.

 

 

2 February 2011

Convention of the Council of Europe on Violence against Women

Christine Chinkin has been acting as scientific adviser to the Council of Europe Ad Hoc Committee on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence (CAHVIO) which in January 2011 finalised the text of the Convention of the Council of Europe on Violence against Women (VAW), and the Explanatory Memorandum. The draft Convention will now be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, and the Parliamentary Assembly for the Council of Europe. It is anticipated that the PACE will adopt the text in March and the Convention will be signed by the Committee of Ministers in May.
 

 

25 January 2011

LLM students' special award in Mediation Competition

On Friday 28th January 2011 the Law Department entered a team for the Worshipful Company of Arbitrators Mediation competition. The team was made up of Simitra Chadha and Carmel Cohalan, both of whom are studying Alternative Dispute Resolution on the LLM. They were coached by Professor Linda Mulcahy and Ruth Gallagher who is also a student on the ADR course. The team were successful in getting through to the semi finals and their performances were much praised by the judges who assessed them in the first three rounds with one judge commenting that 'they have set a benchmark for integrative bargaining that few practitioners in the UK would be able to meet'. In recognition of their skills Simitra and Carmel were given a special award for being the best teambuilders in the competition. They are shown in the photograph being given their award by Lord Woolf who has been an enthusiastic supporter of mediation. The Department's congratulations go to Carmel, Simitra and Ruth for their achievements.

[photograph used with the kind agreement of the Worshipful Company of Arbitrators]

 

25 January 2011

Dr Eva Micheler's research cited by UK Supreme Court

Research by Eva Micheler on disguised returns of capital [“Disguised Returns of Capital – An Arm’s Length Approach,” [2010] CLJ 151] was recently cited by the UK Supreme Court in the decision Progress Property v Moorgarth.

 

11 January 2011

NEW BOOK: Legal Architecture : Justice, Due Process and the Place of Law

Professor Linda Mulcahy's Legal Architecture : Justice, Due Process and the Place of Law (Routeldge : 2010) addresses how the environment of the trial can be seen as a physical expression of our relationship with ideals of justice. It provides an alternative account of the trial, which charts the troubled history of notions of due process and participation. In contrast to visions of judicial space as neutral, Linda Mulcahy argues that understanding the factors that determine the internal design of the courthouse and courtroom are crucial to a broader and more nuanced understanding of the trial. Partitioning of the courtroom into zones and the restriction of movement within it are the result of turf wars about who can legitimately participate in the legal arena and call the judiciary to account. The gradual containment of the public, the increasing amount of space allocated to advocates, and the creation of dedicated space for journalists and the jury, all have complex histories that deserve attention. But these issues are not only of historical significance. Across jurisdictions, questions are now being asked about the internal configurations of the courthouse and courtroom, and whether standard designs meet the needs of modern participatory democracies: including questions about the presence and design of the modern dock; the ways in which new technologies threaten to change the dynamics of the trial and lead to the dematerialization of our primary site of adversarial practice; and the extent to which courthouses are designed in ways which realise their professed status as public spaces.

 

4 January 2011

NEW BOOK: Carter-Ruck on Libel and Privacy

Carter Ruck on Libel and Privacy is the fully revised and renamed edition of this leading volume on the law governing publication and private interests. It offers comprehensive coverage of the substantive laws of defamation and privacy in England and Wales, details the legal practice and procedure in those areas, and gives an account of the comparable laws in over 60 other jurisdictions. Dr Andrew Scott (LSE) has authored six of seven chapters in the entirely new part on privacy law (chs 18-23). These chapters focus on the themes of privacy and publication; misuse of private information: the reasonable expectation of privacy; misuse of private information: the ultimate balancing test; remedies for misuse of private information; harassment, and data protection.

 

4 January 2011

Taylor Wessing Commercial Challenge Win

LSE team win Taylor Wessing CompetitionIn October 2010 a group of second year LLB students (Barry Hughes, Rui da Dilva and Sarah Gledhill) combined with a second year Economic History student (Stephanie Moffat) to form the 'Long Island' team and enter Taylor Wessing's annual competition.

The competition saw 200 students (the maximum Taylor Wessing could allow in the Challenge) enter from Kings, UCL and LSE. These teams were asked to work within a simulated deal, based on a recent acquisition by Google which Taylor Wessing handled, to produce a legal framework for the deal that represented the commercial insight that a top law firm needed to show any potential client. Associates at Taylor Wessing played the part of the client, Goolge.

The challenge demanded a broad array of commercial skills to be demonstrated to a high degree. An initial conference call to the potential client was followed by a written pitch to them. These two stages reduced the field to three finalist teams; one from Kings (the winners of the Challenge last year), UCL and the 'Long Island' team from LSE.

In the December final, after delivering a 15 minute presentation to a 6 person panel, consisting of senior partners and a winner of BBC's 'The Apprentice', and then withstanding 15 minutes of rigorous questioning by the panel, our LSE team won, claiming the title 'Taylor Wessing's Commercial Challenge Winners 2010'. Many congratulations!

 

 

 

14 December 2010

New Papers in the Working Paper Series

We are delighted to announce the third issue of the LSE Law Department's Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series for 2010. 

In this third issue of the Working Paper Series for 2010, Margot Salomon (WP15/2010) explores why global material inequality – and not just poverty – should matter to international human rights law; Thomas Poole (WP16/2010) questions the received genealogy of proportionality, which traces its origins to continental European sources; Julia Black (WP17/2010) asks what lessons can be learned from the financial crisis as to the effectiveness and appropriate role of principles based regulation, and what future it may have; Julia Black (WP18/2010) analyses the cognitive shifts prompted by the financial crisis, and associated policy developments; Carol Harlow (WP19/2010) explores the concept of legitimacy in the literature of law and political science;  Alastair Mullis and Andrew Scott (WP20/2010) re-evaluated fundamental aspects of libel law, its purposes, its substance, and its processes; David Mangan (WP21/2010) explores the dynamics of of collective negotations in the public eductation sector, David Campbell, Matthias Klaes, and Christopher Bignell (WP22/2010) argue that carbon trading which will reduce emissions in line with any of the targets set for avoiding dangerous anthropological interference is impossible; and Pablo Ibáñez Colomo (WP23/2010) examines the implications of Ofcom’s pay-TV consultation for the future of communications regulation.

 

 

6 December 2010

NEW BOOK: Legal Risk in the Financial Markets (2nd. ed.)

Visiting Professor Roger McCormick, project director of the Law and Financial Markets Project, has a new book published by Oxford University Press, the 2nd. edition of Legal Risk in the Financial Markets. Tracing the origins of legal risk as a phenomenon in the global financial markets, particularly in the UK market, this book analyses the different components of legal risk in light of the global financial crisis, identifying characteristics, examples and management strategies, and analyses current and recent legal risk concerns as well as looking to the future. Fully updated from the first edition, this book includes substantial new material on the global financial crisis and its effects on legal risk, coverage of responses to the Crisis in the UK and elsewhere, including G20 proposals and EU initiatives, and substantial new material on globalisation issues. The book also considers the impact of case law, statute law and regulatory change on the management of legal risk.

 

6 December 2010

Lectureships in Law

Salary: from £40,323 - £46,710 per annum inclusive

The Department of Law at the London School of Economics was rated as the best law department in the country by the Research Assessment Exercise 2008. To support our undergraduate and postgraduate teaching programmes and to strengthen our research profile, we are now seeking to appoint at least two lecturers in Law.

For these posts, we invite applications from candidates with teaching experience and evidence of a strong research potential in one or more of the following areas: International Law (preferably International Economic Law), Torts, Employment Law and IT Law.

You will contribute to the scholarship and intellectual life of the School by conducting research which will enhance the School's high reputation as a research-led teaching institution. We encourage the development of teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels and all members of the Department’s academic staff are expected to contribute to core undergraduate teaching.

A PhD (completed or soon to be completed) or commensurate experience is essential.

Appointments will commence on 1 September 2011 or as soon as possible thereafter.

For further information about the Department see http://www/lse.ac.uk/law

To apply for this post please go to http://www.lse.ac.uk/JobsatLSE and select "Visit the ONLINE RECRUITMENT SYSTEM web page". If you have any queries about applying on the online system, please call 020 7955 7859 or email hr.recruit.lec@lse.ac.uk quoting reference LEC/10/15.

The closing date for receipt of applications is Monday 10 January 2011 (11.59pm, UK time). Regrettably, we are unable to accept any late applications.

Interviews will be held on 22 February 2011.

We value diversity and wish to promote equality at all levels

 

1 December 2010

Helen Reece on sex offenders and adoption

Reader in Law, Helen Reece has published new research in the Child and Family Law Quarterly in which she argues that a blanket ban on sex offenders' adopting and fostering is unlawful discrimination under Article 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights. She points to legal challenges that have overturned other blanket bans on adoption, including a 2008 case in which the House of Lords said rules in Northern Ireland preventing cohabiting couples from adopting children were discriminatory. The research has been widely covered in the media, including an article in the Guardian, plus appearances on LBC Radio,  BBC World Service and the Woman's Hour programme.

16 November 2010

Beyani and Marks on Advisory Group on Human Rights

Both Dr Chaloka Beyani and Professor Susan Marks have been asked to serve as members of the Foreign Secretary's Advisory Group on Human Rights. The Group has been established to give the UK government the best possible information about human rights challenges; and for the Foreign Office to benefit from outside advice on the conduct of its policy. It will meet for the first time on December 2. Foreign Secretary William Hague said: “Human rights are essential to and indivisible from the UK’s foreign policy priorities. The members of this group are eminent individuals with a broad range of human rights experience, drawn from NGOs, the legal and academic communities and international bodies. I am delighted that they have agreed to join this Group and look forward to working with them to improve and strengthen our international human rights work.”
    Dr Chaloka Beyani is a UN Special Rapporteur on Internally Displaced People, as well as Senior Lecturer at the LSE, specialising in human rights law, and recently assisted in drafting the Kenyan constitution. Professor Susan Marks joined LSE Law Department in 2010 as a Professor of International Law. Her research interests include democracy, poverty, torture and counter-terrorism.
 

 

9 November 2010

The EU Approach to International Investment Policy after the Lisbon Treaty

Dr Jan Kleinheisterkamp participated in a study commissioned by the European Parliament on "The EU Approach to International Investment Policy after the Lisbon Treaty", which will be discussed today in the Parliament's Committee on International Trade. Part I of the study, which has been headed by Dr Steve Woolcock of the LSE International Relations Department, discusses the Commission's Communication on "Towards a Comprehensive European International Investment Policy" COM(2010) 343 final; and Part II of the study, contributed by Dr Kleinheisterkamp, analyses the Commission's draft Regulation establishing transitional arrangements for bilateral investment agreements between Member States and third countries, COM(2010) 344 final. The study will soon be available on the European Parliament's website, and can be previewed here.

For the EP studies page click here.

 

9 November 2010

Andrew Murray on online extremist videos

Andrew Murray's expertise in internet law was recently acknowledged in an article in the Daily Telegraph, where he commented on relgious extremists' videos on YouTube. He noted that Google/YouTube had specifically chosen guidelines that meant they could assure US civil liberties groups that they were not restricting free speech.

 

9 November 2010

Emeritus Professor Michael Zander, QC honoured by King's College

Congratulations to Emeritus Professor Michael Zander, QC, who has received an Honorary Doctorate of Laws from King’s College, London. His citation stated: "He has devoted a long and active career to the study, teaching, practice and improvement of the law, and has made outstanding contributions in both the academic and public spheres. There is no greater authority in the fields to which he has devoted himself: criminal procedure, civil procedure, legal system, legal profession and legal services. . . The central mission of his professional life has been to make the justice system work better."

 

2 November 2010

NEW BOOK: Theatre of the Rule of Law

Dr Stephen Humphrey's new book, Theatre of the Rule of Law presents the first sustained critique of rule of law promotion – the push to shape laws and institutions that pervades international development and post-conflict reconstruction policy today. While successful in disseminating a policy everywhere privileging the private over the public, this expansive global enterprise has largely failed in its stated goals of alleviating poverty and fortifying ‘fragile states’. Moreover, in its execution, the field deviates sharply from ‘rule of law’ principles as commonly conceived. To explain this, Dr Humphreys examines the history of the rule of law as a term of art and a spectrum of today’s interventions, as well as earlier examples of legal export to other ends. Rule of law promotion, he suggests, is best understood as a kind of theatre, the staging of a morality tale about the good life, intended for edification and emulation but blind to its own internal contradictions.

 

19 October 2010

Professor Conor Gearty: 'Making Truth'

A new post from Professor Gearty on his innovative collaborative website, The Rights' Future.

 

26 October 2010

Pathways to Law for state school pupils

Pathways to LawPathways to Law, a programme run by LSE’s Widening Participation team, has been shortlisted in the ‘Equality and Diversity’ category for the Law Society’s Excellence Awards 2010.
    The Pathways to Law scheme, a project run in conjunction with The College of Law and The Sutton Trust, targets state school pupils who are the first generation of their family to attend university and provides support throughout years 12 and 13 and beyond. It is backed by universities, law firms and The Law Society, enabling a varied programme of lectures, seminars, advice sessions, and e-mentoring, plus an invaluable law firm placement.
    LSE jointly runs the programme with UCL for students in the London region, and is now recruiting 75 students for the next phase. Since it began in 2007, more than 1,100 students have participated in the scheme, with 200 students graduating through the LSE programme.
    For more information about the Pathways to Law scheme or LSE’s Widening Participation activities, please email Niaomi Collett at n.collett@lse.ac.uk or visit the Widening Participation website.

 

 

26 October 2010

Dr Tiffany JenkinsNEW BOOK: Contesting Human Remains in Museum Collections

Visiting Fellow Dr Tiffany Jenkins is the author of Contesting Human Remains in Museum Collections: the crisis of cultural authority (Routlege 2010). Since the late 1970s human remains in museum collections have been subject to claims and controversies, such as demands for repatriation by indigenous groups who suffered under colonization. These requests have been strongly contested by scientists who research the material and consider it unique evidence. Dr Jenkins's research has been discussed recently in both the Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph and Guardian.

19 October 2010

Professor Conor Gearty: 'Taking to the Streets'

A new post from Professor Gearty on his innovative collaborative website, The Rights' Future.

 

 

12 October 2010

Roger McCormick writes UK chapter for IBA report

Visiting Professor, Roger McCormick, director of the Law and Financial Markets Project, has contributed the UK chapter in The International Bar Association’s Task Force on the Financial Crisis A survey of current regulatory trends.

 

12 October 2010

Professor Conor Gearty and The Rights' Future

Professor Conor Gearty is beginning work on a new book, The Rights' Future. Its production process will be unique: an interactive experience, unfolding weekly as a series of online essays, shaped not only by the author’s views but by his online audience. The completed book will be presented at LSE's third Literary Festival in February 2011.
     At the start of each week, Professor Gearty will publish a chapter of the book online in the form of a 2,000 word essay. Students and the general public will then have the opportunity to comment and respond to the piece, with Professor Gearty summarizing the responses, and how they have impacted on his thinking, in a reworked essay by the end of the week. The process will begin again the following Monday with the next installment of the book.
    In a series of twenty essays written in this way over the coming three months he will address the history and politics of human rights, their present state in the world and map out some of the possible futures that await this morally important but highly contested phrase.Titles of the topics to be discussed include: ‘If human rights are not despised by the powerful they are not human rights’; ‘Double standards are valuable as long as they don’t last too long’; ’A world court of human rights is vital – but only if it seems powerless’ and ‘Do trees have rights?’.
    For more information, see the project's website: http://therightsfuture.com

 

 

12 October 2010

Dr Tiffany Jenkins on subsidy and the arts

Visiting Fellow, Dr Tiffany Jenkins, is quoted in a BBC Magazine article, 'Do hard times equal good art?' She suggests the public subsidy can stifle artists.

 

5 October 2010

Dr Chaloka BeyaniDr Chaloka Beyani appointed UN Special Rapporteur

Dr Chaloka Beyani, Senior Lecturer in International Law in the Law Department, has been appointed by the United Nations Human Rights Council to serve as the United Nations Special Rapporteur / Independent Expert on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons. Dr Beyani has just completed serving as a Member of the Committee of Experts that delivered a new Constitution for Kenya. In recommending his appointment, The Office of the High Commission of Human Rights noted Dr Beyani's published work on the topic of displaced persons, his experience as an expert with United Nation agencies and specialized organisations, plus work with the Commonwealth Secretariat and various NGOs.

 

5 October 2010

NEW BOOK: Benjamin's Sale of Goods, 8th edition

The 8th edition of Benjamin's Sale of Goods, edited by Professor Michael Bridge, offers a one stop source to all the elements, principles, legislation and case law surrounding sale of goods not just in the UK but internationally. Changes in the 8th edition include:

  • Updated chapter on documentary credits and demand guarantees

  • Information on the developments of:

    • UCP 600 (2007) (Uniform Rules and Practice on Documentary Credits); URDG 758 (2010) (Uniform Rules on Demand Guarantees); URR 725 (2008) (Uniform Rules for Bank-to-Bank Reimbursements)

  • Detailed account of the effect on sale contracts of the Rotterdam Rules (Convention on the International Carriage of Goods Wholly or Partly by Sea)

  • Dedicated commentary on the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 which caused a major recasting of consumer protection law

  • Discusses the changes to credit agreements for consumers, plus corresponding UK regulations

New key cases include House of Lords decisions on damages and interest – The Golden Victory (2007), Sempra Metals Ltd v IRC (2007) and The Achilleas (2008); The Supreme Court decision on bank charges – Office of Fair Trading v Abbey National Plc (2009); The House of Lords decision on FOB & CIF contracts – Scottish & Newcastle International Ltd v Othon  Ghalanos (2008); The House of Lords decision on replacing defective goods – J & H Ritchie Ltd v Lloyd Ltd (2007).

 

29 September 2010

NEW BOOK: Mental Health and Crime

Mental Health and Crime, the new book by Professor Jill Peay, examines the nature of the relationship between mental disorder and crime. It concludes that the broad definition of what is an all too common human condition – mental disorder – and the widespread occurrence of an equally all too common human behaviour – that of offending – would make unlikely any definitive or easy answer to such questions.
    For those who offend in the context of mental disorder, many aspects of the criminal justice process, and of the disposals that follow, are adapted to take account of a relationship between mental disorder and crime. But if the very relationship is questionable, is the way in which we deal with such offenders discriminatory? Or is it perhaps to their benefit to be thought of as less responsible for their offending than fully culpable offenders? The book thus explores not only the nature of the relationship, but also the human rights and legal issues arising. It also looks at some of the permutations in the therapeutic process that can ensue when those with mental health problems are treated in the context of their offending behaviour.

 

 

28 September 2010

Dr Humphreys to give key-note speech at the UN Social Forum in Geneva

Dr Stephen Humphreys will be giving a key-note speech at the 2010 UN Social Forum in Geneva. The Forum will take place from 4 to 6 October 2010, with Her Excellency Ambassador Laura Dupuy, the Permanent Representative of Uruguay, as the Chairperson-Rapporteur.  The Forum will focus on (a) The adverse effects of climate change on the full enjoyment of human rights, including the right to life and economic, social and cultural rights;  (b) Measures and actions to address the impact of climate change on the full enjoyment of human rights at the local, national, regional and international levels, including on most vulnerable groups, particularly women and children;  (c) International assistance and cooperation in addressing the human rights related impact of climate change.

 

28 September 2010

Corporate fraud reporting requirements are confusing says fraud watchdog

Current obligations on UK companies to prevent, detect and report fraud resemble a patchwork of measures with a worrying absence of any common thread, according to a new report, 'Fraud reporting in listed companies: A shared responsibility', published today by independent fraud watchdog, the Fraud Advisory Panel (FAP). The report calls on government and the business community to develop a more consistent approach to help reduce corporate fraud which is estimated to cost the UK economy £30 billion a year. The project group who drafted the report were chaired by Jonathan Fisher, QC, a visiting professor in the Law Department. Jonathan Fisher QCHe writes:

"The publication of this report is extremely timely. With the Coalition Government poised to introduce a new Economic Crime Agency to tackle serious economic crime, there is an ideal opportunity to address the under-reporting of fraud by introducing measures which discourage businesses from continuing to sweep their dirty linen under the corporate carpet"

 

28 September 2010

Professor Worthington appointed to AHRC

Universities and science minister David Willetts has appointed four new independent academic members to the Arts and Humanities Research Council's governing body. As well as our own Professor Sarah Worthington, they include John Butt, professor of music, University of Glasgow; Ewan McKendrick, pro vice-chancellor and professor of law, University of Oxford; Andrew Thompson, pro vice-chancellor and professor of history, University of Leeds.

 

 

14 September 2010

NEW BOOK: Debating Social RIghts

Debating Law is a new series that gives scholarly experts the opportunity to offer contrasting perspectives on significant topics of contemporary, general interest. In this second volume of the series, Conor Gearty argues that for rights to work effectively in the wider promotion of social justice, they need to be kept as far away as possible from the courts. He acknowledges the value of rights language in legal and political debate and accepts that human rights are not solely civil and political, with social rights language clearly having a progressive, emancipatory dimension. However he says that lawyers — even well-intentioned lawyers — damage the achievability of the kind of radical transformation in the priorities of states that a genuine commitment to social rights surely necessitates. Virginia Mantouvalou argues that social rights, defined as entitlements to the satisfaction of basic needs, are as essential for the well-being of the individual and the community as long-established civil and political rights. The real challenge, she suggests, is how best to give effect to social rights. Drawing on examples from around the world, she argues for their 'legalisation', and examines the role of courts and the role of legislatures in this process, both at a national and a supranational level.

 

 

14 September 2010

Transnational Law Project: Investment Treaty Workshop

LSE Law Department hosted a workshop on 1 September with the aim of bringing together practitioners and academics to discuss three topical and fundamental problems of investment treaty law: What role do analogies play in the construction of investment treaty law and how can choices of analogies be justified? To what degree can and must investment treaty law be reconceptualised as part of public law and what is the role of comparative law in this context? What can empirical research contribute to the understanding and the development of investment treaty law? On each topic, short reaction papers by some participants had been previously circulated so as to allow the workshop to focus only on discussion – which proved to be a very successful format for the exchange of ideas. The workshop was organised by Anthea Roberts and Dr Jan Kleinheisterkamp and moderated by LSE Centennial Professor Jan Paulson. Participants included Hon. Judge Charles Brower, Campbell McLachlan, Zac Douglas, Barton Legum, Luis Gonzales Garcia, Yas Banifatemi, Kate Parlett, Gus van Harten, David Schneiderman, Santiago Montt, Stephan Schill, Kyla Tienhaara, Michael Waibel and Jason Yakee. This event was made possible by the support from the LSE HEIF4 Bid Fund.

 

 

7 September 2010

Unfair commercial practices: research by Professor Susanne Augenhofer

Professor Susanne Augenhofer, a visiting fellow with the Department of Law, is the lead author of two European Union research papers, commissioned by the European Parliament's Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO): 'State of play of the implementation of the provisions on advertising in the unfair commercial practices legislation' (IP/A/IMCO/ST/2010-04) and 'Misleading advertising on the internet' (IP/A/IMCO/ST/2010-05).

 

 

31 August 2010

NEW BOOK: Legal Methods and Systems

Professor Linda Mulcahy (LSE) is co-author, together with Professor Carl Stychin (University of Reading) of the fourth edition of Legal Methods and Systems (Sweet and Maxwell, 2010). The book aims to introduce law students to traditional foundations of legal reasoning alongside socio-legal and critical material which questions the canon. This new edition also reflects on ongoing discussion about human rights, the changing landscape of sipute resolution and diversity in the legal profession; the reform of the tribunal system; the opening of the Supreme Court and the ways in which the insights of comparative lawyers have resonance in contemporary debates aout the multi-cultural nature of our society

 

 

31 August 2010

Dr Chaloka BeyaniKenya ratifies new constitution

Kenya has ratified its new constitution, which was prepared by a group of experts that included Dr Chaloka Beyani, Senior Lecturer in International Law in the Law Department. Dr Beyani was appointed to the committee of experts who prepared the draft constitution in March 2009, on the recommendation of former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan.

 

31 August 2010

Jonathan Fisher QC on Asil Nadir prosecution

Jonathan Fisher QCVisiting Professor Jonathan Fisher QC recently appeared on BBC News (26 August 2010) to assess the difficulty of prosecuting fugitive tycoon Asil Nadir, who has now flown back to the UK, after evading trial since 1993. Mr Nadir, 69, has left his home in northern Cyprus to face fraud charges relating to the collapse of his Polly Peck business empire in 1990. He will appear at the Old Bailey on 3 September.

 

 

31 August 2010

NEW BOOK: Public Law: Text, Cases, and Materials

Dr Jo Murkens is one of three leading academics who have co-authored Public Law: Text, Cases, and Materials (OUP 2010). The book provides a thought-provoking and vivid account of one of the most interesting areas of the undergraduate law syllabus. The authors have drawn on their substantial experience as teachers and researchers to write a book that will enable readers to acquire both a thorough knowledge of the practicalities of this area of law and an understanding of the theoretical and political debates. They explain the key principles of constitutional law and practice, drawing on extracts from a diverse range of materials, along with case studies designed to bring the subject alive. Throughout the book a wealth of learning features - such as questions, discussion points and summaries - are used to help students develop their knowledge and understanding of the issues.
    The book is organised in four parts. Part 1: constitutional fundamentals, introduces the role of constitutions and core principles such the 'rule of law' and the protection of constitutional rights. Part 2: the executive function, focuses on the organisation and nature of government within the UK and the EU. Part 3: legislation. It asks who makes legislation? It also examines the extent to which legislators in the UK and EU are accountable for the rules they generate.
Part 4: the role of the courts and tribunals to explore how disputes between individuals and public bodies are dealt with. This part includes coverage of judicial review and the use of human rights arguments in the UK courts.

 

 

10 August 2010

Dr Salomon considers the ethics of foreign investment in African land

Margot SalomonDr Margot Salomon writes in The Majalla on the question of Middle Eastern states investing in agricultural land in developing countries. The nature of this type of investment has raised ethical concerns. These investments pose particular threats to local communities, especially with regards to food and water security. What kind of responsibilities then do investors have given the potential impact of their investments abroad?

 

27 July 2010

Professor Duxbury and Professor Gearty elected to British Academy Fellowship

Congratulations to both Professor Neil Duxbury and Professor Conor Gearty who have both been elected as Fellows of the British Academy. The Fellowship recognises academics who have achieved distinction in the humanities and social sciences.

 

 

1Professor Conor Gearty4 July 2010

Professor Gearty on the Liberal Democrats and Civil Liberties

In the Guardian, Professor Conor Gearty argues that, in civil liberties, there is a huge gulf between what the Lib Democrat party say and what they do.

 

14 July 2010

Mullis and Scott research cited in Parliamentary debate

Andrew ScottResearch on libel law published by Dr Andrew Scott and Professor Alastair Mullis of the University of East Anglia was recently cited during the Second Reading debate on Lord Lester's Defamation Bill in the House of Lords. It was also quoted at length in the supporting House of Lords Library paper. Versions of the relevant research papers can be accessed here and here.


 

 

23 June 2010

Law and Financial Markets Project: Takeover regulation seminar

LSE Department of Law hosted a seminar on 23 June asking whether UK companies are too exposed to Takeovers. In the wake of Kraft’s takeover of Cadbury, the Takeover Panel has produced a consultation document on whether the Takeover Code should be amended to address this issue. The seminar brought together regulators, business leaders, institutional investors, City lawyers and academics to discuss the issues raised by the consultation document. Speakers at the event included Charlie Crawshay (Deputy Director of the Takeover Panel), David Kershaw (Professor of Law, LSE), Sir Richard Lapthorne (Chairman of Cable & Wireless Communications), Colin Melvin, (CEO of Hermes Equity Ownership Services) and David Paterson, Partner at Herbert Smith LLP.

 

22 June 2010

Professor Snyder at Peking University School of Transnational Law

Congratulations to Professor Francis Snyder who has just been appointed C.V. Starr Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Transnational Law at Peking University School of Transnational Law. The School,  located in Shenzhen in southern China, runs a four-year Juris Doctor (JD) programme, taught in English, with the exception of the 4th year which is taught in Chinese in cooperation with Peking University Law School in Beijing.

 

22 June 2010

New Papers in the Working Paper Series

We are delighted to announce the second issue of the LSE Law Department's Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series for 2010.

In this second edition of the Working Paper Series for 2010, Veerle Heyvaert (WP6/2010) explores the suitability of risk regulation, and particularly the EU approach to risk regulation, as a conceptual and organisational framework for the EU’s battle against climate change; Ewan McGaughey (WP7/2010) critiques the justifications for any different treatment for agency workers compared to direct workers; Edmund-Philipp Schuster (WP8/2010) examines the implications of the market rule and the mandatory bid rule as regulatory approaches in relation to private sale-of-control transactions; Andrew Scott (WP9/2010) questions whether there should be a prior notification obligation on the media in respect of stories that concern the private conduct of individuals; Mike Redmayne (WP10/2010) considers whether there is a convincing rationale for the sort of strong confrontation right found under the ECHR and the US constitution; Andrés Jonathan Drew (WP11/2010) provides both a theoretical framework and empirical evidence for how emissions trading policy can be improved; Julia Black (WP12/2010) traces on the management of the financial crisis and its aftermath in the UK, focusing on the constitutional dimension; Kai Möller (WP13/2010) asks whether the right to life is absolute in human and constitutional rights law; and Igor Stramignoni (WP14/2010) considers the relationship between art and law, between the poet and the city, in Badiou’s oeuvre.

 

15 June 2010

New book by Professor Loughlin: Foundations of Public Law

Professor Martin Loughlin has published his latest book Foundations of Public Law (OUP, 2010). It offers a distinctive, provocative theory of public law, building on the views first outlined in The Idea of Public Law (OUP, 2003). The theory aims to identify the essential character of public law, explain its particular modes of operation, and specify its unique task.

 

 

15 June 2010

Professor Sarah Worthington made Bencher of Middle Temple

Congratulations to Professor Sarah Worthington, who has been appointed Academic Bencher of her Inn of Court, the Middle Temple. The Inns of Court have an historic role in the training and regulation of barristers. Each Inn of Court is governed by a Treasurer, who acts for one year, with the help of the benchers, who are senior barristers and act as the Inn's governing body or 'Parliament'.

 

15 June 2010

Prof Ken Macdonald QC made Liberal Democrat peer

Congratulations to Visiting Professor Ken Macdonald QC, who was recently made a life peer in the Dissolution Honours.

 

15 June 2010

Professor Loughlin on Professor John Griffith

Professor Martin Loughlin recently discussed the life and work of Professor John Griffith (1918-2010) on BBC Radio Wales's Postscript programme.

 

 

08 June 2010

Professor McCormick on CNBC

Visiting Professor Roger McCormick, director of the Law and Financial Markets Project, appeared on US television yesterday, talking on CNBC regarding the G20 dropping the idea of a bank levy. "Some of the steam has gone out of the push for a united global financial regulation" said Professor McCormick.

 

25 May 2010

Thomas Poole quoted in NYT article on British constitution

Dr Thomas Poole, senior lecturer in law, was quoted in yesterday's New York Times in an article explaining the lack of a codified British constitution.

 

 

22 May 2010

Gangjee on L'Oreal SA v Bellure NV

Lecturer in Law, Dev Gangjee recently co-authored a comment on the European Court of Justice ruling in L'Oreal SA v Bellure NV (C-487/07) with Robert Burrell (University of Queensland). The ruling considered whether the use of the trade mark brand names of luxury perfume products on "smell-alike" price comparison lists produced by a budget perfume producer was permissible under Directive 89/104 (Trade Marks Directive) art.5(1)(a) or took unfair advantage of the marks within the meaning of art.5(2) by "free-riding" on their reputation. The commentary by Gangjee and Burrell (Modern Law Review 73 (2) 2010  pp. 282-295 ) criticised the reasoning of the court and argued that the ruling was counter to Directive 84/450 and previous ECJ rulings. It has just been cited with approval by the Court of Appeal in a judgment published yesterday in a continuation of the same dispute.

 

19 May 2010

Professor Klug awarded Bernard Crick Prize

Professorial Research Fellow Francesca Klug  has been awarded the Political Quarterly Bernard Crick Prize for best essay. The award is for her essay 'Solidity or Wind?' What's on the Menu in the Bill of Rights Debate?' which was published in Political Quarterly in Autumn 2009. The essay analyses the factors behind the current debate on a British bill of rights and responsibilities. The title is drawn from George Orwell's 1946 essay, Politics and the English Language.

 

 

18 May 2010

Information Technology Law - coverNew book by Andrew Murray: Information Technology Law : The law and society

Reader in Law Andrew Murray has authored a new book, published by Oxford University Press, entitled Information Technology Law : The law and society. The book provides comprehensive coverage of all aspects of the law as it relates to the modern online environment, including governance, digital expression, IPRs and digitisation, e-crimes, e-commerce and data privacy/protection.

 

18 May 2010

New book by Robert Reiner: The Politics of the Police

Professor of Criminology Robert Reiner has just published the fourth edition of his acclaimed book The Politics of the Police, available from Oxford University Press. The work includes a new chapter on developing theory and research on policing: 'Watching the watchers: theory and research in policing studies'. Chapter 2 on the rise and fall of police legitimacy has been expanded to suggest a third stage 'beyond legitimation'. All chapters have been heavily revised and updated to take in recent research and law and policy developments.

 

 

18 May 2010

The Negotiable ConstitutionGrégoire Webber's The Negotiable Constitution

Grégoire Webber's latest book, The Negotiable Constitution: On the Limitation of Rights (CUP 2009) has been the subject of two workshop discussions, at McGill University's Legal Theory Workshop and the University of Western Ontario's Public Law and Legal Philosophy Research Group.

 

 

18 May 2010

Professor Klug on the UK's 'unwritten constitution'

Professorial Research Fellow Francesca Klug contributes to the Guardian's 'Blogging the Bill of Rights' series, considering the United Kingdom's 'unwritten constitution' and its relation to the Human Rights Act.

 

Professor John Griffith (1918-2010)

It is with great sadness that we announce that John Griffith, one of the leading public law scholars of the twentieth century, has died. John did so much to advance the discipline, not only with his pioneering books on administrative law, central-local government relations, parliament and the judiciary but also through his editorship of Public Law from its founding in 1956 through till 1981.

John maintained a lifelong association with the School: he arrived as an undergraduate in 1937 and, but for the war years and a short period at Aberystwyth, taught at the School from 1948 until his retirement in 1984. He was a charismatic teacher, a scholar of radical and independent opinions, a loyal and supportive colleague, and through his teaching and writing he influenced many generations of students.

John was not only a major figure in the legal academy but also in the history of the School. As Lord Dahrendorf noted in his history of the LSE, Griffith was ‘the conscience of the School and guardian of its tradition in critical times’. John maintained a personal link in the chain that led back to Laski, Jennings and Robson and his passing brings to a close a remarkable chapter in the School’s history.

 

 

4 May 2010

Dev Gangjee on Indian Legal Education Reform

Dr Dev Gangjee recently gave a paper entitled 'Law Teaching in India and Overseas : A Comparative Perspective' at India's National Consultation for Second Generation Legal Education Reforms in New Delhi. The conference (1-2 May 2010) was jointly organised by the Ministry of Law and Justice, Bar Council of India and the National Law University, New Delhi, and was opened by the Prime Minister of India, along with the Chief Justice and the Law Minister.

 

27 April 2010

Times/Matrix Debate on Human Rights Act

Professor Conor Gearty was amongst the leading academics and legal practitioners at the recent Times/Matrix Chambers debate (20 April 2010) on the motion: “The Human Rights Act should be scrapped and replaced by a British Bill of Rights”. LSE alumni Cherie Booth, QC, also participated.

 

20 April 2010

Grégoire Webber on bilingualism and high office in Canada

Dr Grégoire Webber writes in today's Ottawa Citizen regarding the importance of bilingualism in Canadian public life.

 

20 April 2010

The Liberal Democrats and the Human Rights Act

Professor Francesca Klug, a Professorial Research Fellow in the department, comments in the Guardian on Liberal Democrat support for the Human Rights Act in their election manifesto.

 

30 March 2010

Dr Igor Stramignoni Dr Igor Stramignoni at Law and Art: Ethics, Aesthetics and Justice

Dr Igor Stramignoni spoke recently at Tate Modern Gallery in London in a major symposium, Law and Art: Ethics, Aesthetics and Justice, organised to reflect on the long-standing but problematic relationship between art and law. He discussed how art, politics, and the rule of law are played out in the the work of Alain Badiou, probably the most important French philosopher active in the world today.

 

16 March 2010

Jonathan Fisher QC on Fighting Fraud and Financial Crime

Jonathan Fisher QCIn his new report for Policy Exchange, Visiting Professor Jonathan Fisher QC argues that the present arrangements for fighting serious fraud, corruption and financial market crimes are lamentably deficient. The haphazard development of the Government agencies tasked with tackling these crimes has created a system of overlapping responsibilities for investigation and prosecution, a dispersion of powers and caused unnecessary duplication of manpower and specialist resources. Perhaps unsurprisingly then, our criminal justice system struggles to cope with complex fraud trials and if the perpetrators of these crimes are to be brought to account, important changes to the criminal law need to be made. Professor Fisher also puts forward his arguments in the Times of March 11.

16 March 2010

Nizar Manek on obstacles to 'tax equity'

Undergraduate law student, Nizar Manek, has recently published an article on openDemocray.net, on obstacles to tax equity. His themes include the power afforded to 'non-domiciled' political party donees and ‘high net-worth’ individuals, and an expected international ripple effect on tax policy of a recent 5-4 majority decision of the US Supreme Court, which declared restrictions to corporate entities freedom to advertise during election campaigns unconstitutional.

US Supreme Court decision: Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission

openDemocracy article: Hidden Incentives: How Tax Equity is Foiled – the Footloose Rich, the Corporate Lobby

 

11 March 2010

Dr Margot Salomon speaking at NYU

Margot SalomonDr Margot Salomon will present her work on ‘Affluence and International Human Rights Law’ at New York University Law School following an invitation from the Institute for International Law and Justice and the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice. While international human rights law is undoubtedly alive to the poverty that continues to plague half of humanity why hasn’t it provided more of a counterweight to the ills that plague the world’s poor? This study explores doctrinal weaknesses within this area of international law that are serving inadequately to mitigate globalization’s most harmful tendencies and practices. Professor Philip Alston as commentator and Professor Robert Howse as moderator.

 

10 March 2010

Dr Hoffman on Human Rights and Human Dignity

As part of the 'Swiss Initiative to Commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights' Dr Florian Hoffmann recently participated in two seminars to present research on Human Dignity: A New Approach to Vulnerable Groups elaborated jointly with Dr Frédéric Mégret, of McGill University's Center for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism. The first, a Regional Seminar on Human Dignity: An Agenda for Human Rights, took place in Doha (Qatar) on February 22 and was convened by Mary Robinson, co-chair of the Swiss Initiative's Panel of Eminent Persons. The second was a debate with Prof. Manfred Novak (University of Vienna), UN Special Rapporteur on Torture, on the protection of human dignity within a proposed World Court on Human Rights, co-sponsored by the Geneva Film Festival and Forum on Human Rights and the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights on March 10.

 

 

9 March 2010

New book by Professor Loughlin: 'The Twilight of Constitutionalism?'

Oxford University Press have just published The Twilight of Constitutionalism, edited by Petra Dobner, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Halle, Germany and Martin Loughlin, Professor of Public Law, LSE.
    "The concepts and values that underpin traditional constitutionalism are increasingly being challenged by political realities that place substantial power beyond the state. Among the few certainties of a global economy is the growing incongruity between the political (the world of things that need to be ordered collectively in order to sustain society) and the state (the major institution of authoritative political decision-making during modern times). The consequences, and possible remedies, of this double disjunction of politics and state and of state and constitution form the centre of an open debate about 'constitutionalism beyond the state'."

 

9 March 2010

Ali Auda wins Photo Prize 2010.

The car shook, the smoke filled the airCongratulations to Ali Auda, an undergraduate student in the Law Department, who has won the LSE's 2010 Photo Prize for his image entitled 'The car shook, the smoke filled the air'. The prize celebrates the creativity of LSE’s student s and staff. This year’s open submission exhibition was the first to have a theme, focusing on ‘risk’.

 

9 March 2010

Professor Sarah Worthington made honorary QC

Professor Sarah Worthington, pro-director and professor of law at LSE, has been appointed as one of five Queen’s Counsel honoris causa (honorary silk) by HM The Queen. The position is an honorary appointment recognising a major contribution to the law of England and Wales outside of practice in the courts. Professor Worthington was recommended for her academic work in the field of corporate and commercial law together with her work advising government. The Lord Chancellor will preside over the appointment ceremony, where the rank will formally be bestowed at Westminster Hall on 22 March.

 

2 March 2010

Prof Ken Macdonald QC on torture and the intelligence services

Visiting Professor Ken Macdonald QC writes in the Times on British attitudes to torture and the role of the Intelligence and Security Committee.

 

 

2 March 2010

New Papers in the Working Paper Series

We are delighted to announce the first issue of the LSE Law Department's Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series for 2010. 

In this first edition of the Working Paper Series for 2010, William Goodhart, QC (WP1/2010) provides a biography of his father Arthur Lehman Goodhart under the auspices of the LSE Law Department’s Legal Biography Project; Jan Paulsson (WP2/2010) examines the sources of authority and legal orders that govern arbitration, and argues that arbitration in modern society is a complex, three-dimensional form of pluralism, in which legal orders are not exclusively those of states and frequently overlap; Conor Gearty (WP3/2010) analyses  the terms ‘liberty’ and ‘security’ against a background of contemporary concerns about terrorism and the decline of freedom and argues for a new reconciliation between liberty and security based on the language of human rights and manifested in a wider approach to security and a renewed commitment to the criminal law; Julia Black (WP4/2010) maps the current state of empirical legal studies in financial law which focus upon the impact of law and regulation on financial markets, of financial markets on law and regulation, and of different understandings of the behaviour of actors within the markets for using law and regulation as an instrument to affect markets; and finally Thomas Poole (WP5/2010) analyses a site of constitutional abnormality in judicial review – prerogative power – to provide a basis for a more general account of the contemporary nature and role of judicial review.

 

2 March 2010

Kristen RundleDr Kristen Rundle on Gordon Brown's apology to child migrants

Dr Rundle - whose grandfather was sent to Australia under the child migration scheme in the 1930s - comments on the UK government's apology in the Guardian. She is also quoted in the Times Higher Education Supplement.

 

 

23 February 2010

New book:
'How to Protect Investors: Lessons from the EC and the UK'

Professor Niamh Moloney's latest book, How to Protect Investors: Lessons from the EC and the UK, has been published by Cambridge University Press. Taking as a case study the wide-ranging investor protection regime which governs Europe's retail markets after an intense reform period, the book provides a critical, comparative and contextual examination of the nature of investor protection, exploring why the retail investor should be protected, whether retail investor engagement with the markets should be encouraged, and how investor-protection laws should be designed, particularly in light of the financial crisis.

 

16 February 2010

Andrew Scott on libel reform

Andrew Scott

Dr Andrew Scott was cited in the Guardian yesterday in an article on libel reform. He was also quoted by the BBC in an article on IMMI's recent proposal to protect journalists and their sources. Something Rotten in the State of English Libel Law? a report by Dr Scott and co-author Professor Alastair Mullis (University of East Anglia) has just been published.

 

10 February 2010

‘Lord Hoffmann’s Contribution to Company Law’

On 4 February 2010, the LSE’s Law and Financial Markets project hosted a seminar on 'Lord Hoffmann’s Contribution to Company Law', attended by Lord Hoffmann himself. The seminar addressed three of the key areas in which Lord Hoffmann’s judgments have made a significant contribution to UK company law: the unfair prejudice remedy; the duty of care; and rules of attribution. The seminar was attended by members of the judiciary, leading corporate barristers and solicitors; and US and UK corporate legal academics. Short papers were given in each of the three areas followed by comments from Lord Hoffmann and then a very lively discussion. Papers on the unfair prejudice remedy were given by Professor John Armour and Mr Leslie Kosmin QC; papers on the duty of care by Justice Jack Jacobs and David Kershaw; and papers on the rules of attribution were given by Professor Eilis Ferran and Mr Jonathan Sumption QC.

 

2 February 2010

Webber and Gearty at Leeds

The importance of deliberation suggests a political concept of justice that is inconsistent with universal ideas around human rights and a limited role for domestic and international courts, with the focus returning to Parliament. Proponents of a deliberative or dialogical model of constitutional rights point to the importance of the relationship between institutions, with judicial review simply another step in the establishment of justice norms in conditions of uncertainty and disagreement. These ideas are explored in a forthcoming series of seminars at the Centre for International Governance, Leeds School of Law, with a focus on the reform of the Human Rights Act.  Dr Grégoire Webber and Professor Conor Gearty are both contributing to the series.

 

27 January 2010

Incoherent legal reform risks ‘death of libel'

Andrew ScottThe adoption of the many current proposals to reform the laws of defamation would leave the media free to publish false allegations with little fear of being put to redress, according to a report just published by Dr Andrew Scott (LSE, Department of Law) and co-author Professor Alastair Mullis (University of East Anglia). The report Something Rotten in the State of English Libel Law? argues that the public debate – as being played out in the media – concerning the reform of libel law has been one-sided. It highlights and respond to criticisms of libel law that Scott and Mullis believe are based on partial understandings of the existing law.
    Dr Scott says: ‘Press freedom and discussion are vital to democracy. Misuse of an overbroad, and particularly an overly costly, libel regime can impact upon investigative journalism, scientific discussion, and the important work of NGOs. However, the reality of most libel actions, which involve bullied and harassed claimants challenging damaging inaccuracies perpetuated by multinational media corporations has somehow been lost from the debate.’

 

26 January 2010

Professor Peay speaks at 'Decision-Making and Dementia'

Professor Jill Peay was invited to speak on 'Decision-Making and Dementia' at the Scottish Government's Dementia Strategy Seminar on 'Rights, Dignity and Personalisation'  in Edinburgh on Friday 22nd January.  Other presentations were made by members of the Nuffield Council's Working Party on Bioethics Dementia: Ethical Issues.  The Cross-Party Group in the Scottish Parliament launched its Charter of Rights for People with Dementia and their Carers in Scotland last autumn.

 

 

20 January 2010

Professor Francesca Klug on David Cameron and the Human Rights Act

Professor Francesca Klug, a Professorial Research Fellow in the department, comments in the Guardian on David Cameron's pledge to repeal to the Human Rights Act.

 

 

The Negotiable Constitution5 January 2010

New Book: The Negotiable Constitution: On the Limitation of Rights

Dr Grégoire Webber's latest book The Negotiable Constitution is now available from Cambridge University Press:

In matters of rights, constitutions tend to avoid settling controversies. With few exceptions, rights are formulated in open-ended language, seeking consensus on an abstraction without purporting to resolve the many moral-political questions implicated by rights. The resulting view has been that rights extend everywhere but are everywhere infringed by legislation seeking to resolve the very moral-political questions the constitution seeks to avoid. The Negotiable Constitution challenges this view. Arguing that underspecified rights call for greater specification, Grégoire C. N. Webber draws on limitation clauses common to most bills of rights to develop a new understanding of the relationship between rights and legislation. The legislature is situated as a key constitutional actor tasked with completing the specification of constitutional rights. In turn, because the constitutional project is incomplete with regards to rights, it is open to being re-negotiated by legislation struggling with the very moral-political questions left underdetermined at the constitutional level.

 

 

14 December 2009

Professor Ken Macdonald QC on the Iraq War Inquiry

Visiting Professor Ken Macdonald QC writes in the Times of 14 December on the Iraq War, describing it as 'a foreign policy disgrace of epic proportions.'

[read the Times article in full]

 

14 December 2009

Andrew Murray and Andrew Scott respond to government consultation on defamation and the internet

Together with Charlie Beckett (the Director of Polis), Andrew Murray and Andrew Scott recently submitted a response to the Ministry of Justice consultation on defamation and the internet. The consultation was focused on possible reform of the Duke of Brunswick multiple publication rule in order to limit the liability in libel of the publishers of online archives (such as internet versions of newspapers). It mooted a move to a single publication rule (perhaps with an extension of the current limitation period), or an extension of the statutory qualified privilege defence. The LSE response suggested instead the introduction of a new defence of 'non-culpable republication'. Subject to certain conditions, this defence would extend not only to online archive publishers but also potentially to other authors whose work is replicated by others across the internet. A full version of the response can be accessed here (Word docx). Andrew Murray is an expert on cyber-regulation and IT law, while Andrew Scott specialises in media law and regulation.

 

 

10 December 2009

New book : Human Rights and Climate Change

Human Rights and Climate Change - coverDr Stephen Humphreys is the editor of a new book, Human Rights and Climate Change, published by Cambridge University Press. The  transformational impact of climate change on human rights concerns are particularly acute. They include forced mass migration, increased disease incidence and strain on healthcare systems, threatened food and water security, the disappearance and degradation of shelter, land, livelihoods and cultures, and the threat of conflict. The book looks beyond potential impacts to examine the questions raised by climate change policies: accountability for extraterritorial harms; constructing reliable enforcement mechanisms; assessing redistributional outcomes; and allocating burdens, benefits, rights and duties among perpetrators and victims, both public and private.

[see the publisher's site]

[click here for preview]

 

Andrew Murray2 December 2009

Andrew Murray on illegal file sharing and digital copyright

Andrew Murray, reader in law, an expert in cyber-regulation and IT law, was quoted in the International Herald Tribune yesterday on UK government measures to combat illegal file-sharing.

[read the International Herald Tribune Article article in full]

 

 

Veerle Heyvaert1 December 2009

Dr Heyvaert on EU environmental policy

Dr Veerle Heyvaert is quoted in a recent issue of Staatscourant (the Dutch Official Journal) in an article discussing the division of competencies between the EU and its Member States for environmental policy and law-making.She argues that, for matters which affect the internal market, it is difficult, though not impossible, for Member States to opt up from EU law. For environmental matters outside of the scope of the internal market, opt-ups are easier, but Member States do not often make use of the facility. She also notes that the EU is sometimes used as a scapegoat to justify unambitious environmental policies domestically.

[read the article in full (Dutch)]

 

Professor Damian Chalmers24 November 2009

Professor Chalmers on the EU Charter

Professor Damian Chalmers writes on BBC News site on the nature of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, brought into force by the Lisbon Treaty, arguing that it merely 'repackages old wine in new bottles'.

[read the BBC article in full]

 

 

Dr Chaloka Beyani17 November 2009

Chaloka Beyani gives vote of thanks at Kenyan Constitution launch

Dr Chaloka Beyani, Senior Lecturer in International Law in the Law Department, gave a vote of thanks before the Prime Minister of Kenya, the Right Honourable Raila Odinga, and Vice President Kalonzo Musyoka, on the occasion of the official launch of the harmonised draft Constitution of Kenya on 17th November 2009. Dr Beyani is a Member of the Committee of Experts on Constituional Review in Kenya and participated in preparing the draft Constitution, which will be subjected to a referendum next year. He was appointed to the Committee in March this year on the recommendation of former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan.

 

17 November 2009

LSE welcomes Jan Paulsson and launches Transnational Law Project

Jan Paulsson, former partner of Freshfields and co-head of its International Arbitration and Public International Law groups, joins the LSE Department of Law as a Centennial Professor. He will be giving a public lecture ‘The Role of Arbitration in the Emergence of Transnational Law - Arbitration’s Fluid Universe’ on 24 November (Hong Kong Theatre, 6.00-8.00 pm, see here). This lecture will also mark the official launch of the Law Department’s Transnational Law Project. This new research project is dedicated to the phenomenon of transnational procedures and rules being created in response to the need of globalised economic transactions, often in defiance of traditional understandings of law and regulation. The project aims at a critical analysis of the dynamics of this transnational legal change and offers a forum for dialogue between the scholarly community, policy makers and practitioners.

[click here for the Transnational Law Project]

 

17 November 2009

Dr Stephen Humphreys on climate change.

Dr Stephen Humphreys was among the keynote speakers at the Swedish Human Rights Forum on Monday November 16 in Stockholm, where over 2,000 delegates met to discuss climate change and human rights. Dr Humphreys discussed the adequacy of human rights law in the face of climate change. He also featured in a broadcast on the Swedish television station SVT about a mock trial of humanity in which he participated, that envisaged looking back on the devastation of climate change from the future.

 

10 November 2009

African Union adopts a Convention on the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons

An extra-ordinary Summit of the African Union Heads of State and Government held in Kampala 22-23 October 2009 adopted a Convention on Internally Displaced Persons, which is the first such treaty in international law. The treaty was designed and drafted by Dr Chaloka Beyani, Senior Lecturer in International Law, Law Department LSE. Dr Beyani performed a key role in negotiating the adoption of the treaty from 2005 to 2009.

[read the Convention in full]

 

10 November 2009

Prof Chalmers on the Lisbon Treaty

Damian Chalmers, Professor of European Union Law, discussed Conservative policy and the Lisbon Treaty in the Daily Telegraph (2 November 2009). He also appeared on BBC Radio 4's World at One on 3 November 2009, and Newsnight on 4 November 2009, addressing the same topic.

[click here for the full Daily Telegraph article]

 

 

03 November 2009

New Papers in the Working Paper Series

We are delighted to announce the fourth issue of the LSE Law Department's Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series for 2009. In this issue, Nico Krisch (WP17/2009) traces the structure of pluralism in a central area of global governance and seeks to shed light on the common charge that pluralist orders create instability, Nicola Lacey (WP18/2009) applies the famous story of Jekyll and Hyde to the question of responsibility for crime, Grégoire C N Webber (WP19/2009) examines reflect how originalism can be understood not as a theory of interpretation but rather as a constitution, Peter Ramsay (WP20/2009) reviews the case law on the offence of breach of an ASBO and offers a theory of the public wrong identified by the courts as the reason for punishing people who commit the offence, David Mangan (WP21/2009) explores the concept of professional status in teachers’ employment contracts, and Jan Kleinheisterkamp (WP22/2009) examines the impact that internationally mandatory rules of the forum state may have on the effectiveness of arbitration agreements.

 

27 October 2009

Ken Macdonald QC on torture

Visiting Professor Ken Macdonald QC, former Director of Public Prosecutions, writes on the subject of torture and the security services in today's Times.

[read the Times article in full]

 

27 October 2009

Carol Harlow QC made Academic Bencher at Middle Temple

Professor Carol Harlow has been appointed Academic Bencher of her Inn of Court, the Middle Temple. The Inns of Court have an historic role in the training and regulation of barristers. Each Inn of Court is governed by a Treasurer, who acts for one year, with the help of the benchers, who are senior barristers and act as the Inn's governing body or 'Parliament'. Professor Harlow also recently gave the prestigious Harry Street Memorial Lecture at University of Manchester on the subject of 'Rationalising Administrative Compensation'.

[read more about the Middle Temple]

 

 

Jonathan Fisher QC

20 October 2009

Jonathan Fisher QC on the FSA and SFO

Writing in the Lawyer, Visiting Professor Jonathan Fisher QC argues that insider dealing prosecutions should be left to the Serious Fraud Office. Professor Fisher was also interviewed recently by BBC News 24 on MP's election expenses and, in particular, the legality of Sir Thomas Legg's recommendations, where he explained the law on retrospectivity.

[read the full article in the Lawyer]
 

Julia Black16 October 2009

Prof Julia Black on financial regulation in FT

A letter from Professor Julia Black appears in today's Financial Times, in which she argues that a distinction between “regulation” and “supervision” is unhelpful in recasting financial regulation.

[read the letter in full in the Financial Times]

 

 


13 October 2009

Prof Lacey on BBC Radio 4

Professor Nicola Lacey appeared on BBC Radio 4's Thinking Allowed on 7 October with Professor Loic Wacquant, discussing the US prison system.

[listen to the Thinking Allowed programme]

 


6 October 2009

Ken Macdonald QC on the Supreme Court

Visiting Professor Ken Macdonald QC writes in the Times on the creation of the new Supreme Court: "The message is clear: this will be a Constitutional Court and it will take to power with ease."

[read the Times article in full]

 

6 October 2009

Hong Kong Lectures announced

The Hong Kong Public Affairs and Social Service Society of the LSE Students’ Union proudly presents a series of two legal lectures in October, featuring respectively the Chief Justice and the former Attorney General of the Hong Kong SAR. The series begins with an exclusive address to Law students by the Chief Justice of the Court of Final Appeal of the Hong Kong SAR, The Honourable Chief Justice Li Kwok-nang, Andrew GBM, CBE, QC, JP.   This will take place on 13 October 2009 (Tuesday) from 3.30 pm to 5 pm at the New Theatre (E171). This would be a great opportunity to meet the first and only Chief Justice since the 1997 handover and to learn more about the Legal System of Hong Kong.  This event is free and open to all Law students and academics however a ticket is required and needs to be requested beforehand. Interested parties should access www.lsehkpass.com on which a link to the ticket request form will appear on Monday 5th October 2009.

The series continues with an evening with LSE alumnus and successful barrister Michael Thomas CMG QC.  This will take place on 21 October 2009 (Wednesday) from 5 pm to 7 pm at the New Academic Building.  This would be a great opportunity to meet the penultimate Hong Kong Attorney General, who shall be speaking to us about the differences between Hong Kong and London in terms of the seemingly similar Common Law system and his own experience in living and working between the two cities.  This event is free and open to all and no ticket is required.  Please RSVP for this event by emailing su.soc.hkpass@lse.ac.uk

 

 

6 October 2009

Dementia : Ethical Issues - coverDementia : Ethical Issues published

Professor Jill Peay is a member of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics' working party of health and academic experts who have been examining the ethical issues raised by dementia. Following a public consultation and meetings with stakeholders including people with dementia, carers, health professionals and other members of the public, a report with recommendations for policy makers was published on 1st October 2009.

[read the press release and report at the Nuffield Council website]

 

 

6 October 2009

UN report on Gaza war crimes

The United Nations fact-finding mission on the Gaza conflict at the start of this year, of which Professor Christine Chinkin was a member, has found evidence that both Israeli forces and Palestinian militants committed serious war crimes and breaches of humanitarian law, which may amount to crimes against humanity.

[read the United Nations press release]

 

29 September 2009

Prof Worthington comments on Anglo-Saxon gold

Professor Sarah Worthington is quoted in the Birmingham Post on the legal issues surrounding the recovery of the Anglo-Saxon treasure recently found in Staffordshire.

[read the Birmingham Post article in full]

 

15 September 2009

'Our weapons must be fair, but devastating' — Ken Macdonald, QC

Ken Macdonald QC, visiting professor in the Law Department and former Director of Public Prosecutions, writes in the Times about the need for the justice system to modernise in order to catch modern criminals, including his thoughts on convictions in the airline bomb plot.

[read the Times article in full]
 

15 September 2009

New Academic Building, Reproduced with kind permission of Grimshaw Architects © Jens WillebrandNew Academic Building opens doors to public

The New Academic Building, in which the Law Department is based, will open its doors to the general public on Sunday 20 September as part of London's annual 'Open House Weekend'. The building is open between 1pm and 5pm on Sunday. There will be regular half-hourly tours, first come, first served basis; last tour 4.30pm.

 

[about the New Academic Building]

[Open House Weekend site]

8 September 2009

Dr Siva Thambisetty on Patent Litigation Costs

Siva ThambisettyDr Thambisetty has contributed a report on patent enforcement in the UK to the Strategic Advisory Board on Intellectual Property (SABIP) which forms the basis of SABIP's response to Lord Justice Jackson's Review on Civil Litigation Costs. The Review will make recommendations to promote justice at proportionate cost, and is expected to conclude in Dec 2009. High patent litigation costs are a particularly vexed issue for SMEs, which may, in the words of the Intellectual Property Court Users Committee, be facing an 'unmet demand for justice'.

[Copies of the report are available from Dr Thambisetty (s.thambisetty@lse.ac.uk)]

 

8 September 2009

Dr Margot Salomon

Dr Salomon at the UN Social Forum, Geneva

Dr Margot Salomon has returned from attending the 2009 Social Forum of the UN's Human Rights Council, which ran from 31 August to 2 September at Geneva. The Forum considered issues around human rights and the global economy. Dr Salomon was invited to attend the three day session as an expert, and also spoke on 'Strengthening the effectiveness of international assistance and cooperation in combating poverty.'

[more about the Social Forum of the Human Rights Council]

 

1 September 2009

Prof Collins on unfair sales practices in the Guardian

Professor Hugh Collins was recently interviewed for a Guardian article on the rights of customers faced with misleading or aggressive sales practices. The article points out that new legislation falls short of giving customers rights to compensation, if they fall victim to such practices. Prof Collins is quoted:  'As a point of legal and moral principle, consumers who suffer loss should have the opportunity to obtain compensation in the courts from those who caused it. The government should rectify this problem'.

[read the Guardian article in full]

 

1 September 2009

Helen Reece on BBC's Woman's Hour

Helen Reece joins the department today as a reader in law. She recently appeared on BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour programme, discussing parents' and children's rights. She has also recently been quoted in the Observer (6 September 2009).

[click here for the BBC broadcast]

[read the Observer article in full]

 

11 August 2009

Prof Jackson comments on litigation over antidepressant risk

It has emerged that thousands of women in the UK may be taking antidepressants prescribed by their GPs without knowing that the pills, which are hard to stop taking, could cause birth defects in unborn children. Professor Emily Jackson comments in the Guardian, stating that there may be a case for legal action in the UK

[click here for the Guardian article]

 

11 August 2009

Dr Dev Gangjee wins 2009 teaching prize

The 2009 department prize for teaching excellence was awarded to Dr Dev Gangjee. As well as being a conscientious, friendly, and effective teacher, Dev's excellent work in giving helpful feedback to students both in person and on LSEForYou was noted as particuarly outstanding.

 

 

31 July 2009

Prof Jackson on BBC's Newsnight

Prof Emily JacksonProfessor Emily Jackson appeared yesterday on the BBC's Newsnight, to discuss how the law on assisted suicide is to be clarified. She was also quoted in Time magazine.

[click here for the Newsnight programme website]

[click here for the Time article]

 

 

 

 

21 July 2009

Professors Chinkin and Worthington elected Fellows of British Academy

Congratulations to two professors from the Law department, who have been elected Fellows of the British Academy in recognition of their outstanding scholarship.
Christine Chinkin    Professor Christine Chinkin and Professor Sarah Worthington join the elite group of 900 Fellows at the Academy, which is devoted to inspiring and supporting the nation's best work in humanities and social sciences.
    Christine Chinkin is Professor of International Law at LSE. She specialises in human rights law and was a member of the United Nations fact-finding mission to Beit Hanoun in Gaza that reported in 2008 and is currently a member of the fact-finding mission to Gaza for 2009. She is also the UK representative on the appeals board of the Western European Union and gives expert advice to the Council of Europe on the drafting of a convention on violence against women.
    Her publications include The Making of International Law, (with A. Boyle) (Oxford University Press, 2007), Women's Human Rights and Religion: how do they co-exist? in Religion, Human Rights and International Law and many other articles which focus on the guarantee of women's human rights.

Sarah Worthington    Sarah Worthington is Professor of Law, specialising in commercial equity, property and securities, and corporate governance, and also pro-director of LSE, responsible for research and external relations - a position she has held since 2005.
    She is a barrister and former president of the Society of Legal Scholars, and has worked with various UK, European and Australian law reform and policy advice groups. Her publications include Equity, in the Clarendon Law Series, and books on personal property and securities law and company law.
    Professor Worthington said: 'Becoming a Fellow of the British Academy is a huge honour. It's humbling to have such a vote of confidence, and daunting to consider what responsibilities the privilege brings.'

 

 

8 July 2009

New Papers in the Working Paper Series

We are delighted to announce the third issue of the LSE Law Department's Law, Society and Economy  Working Paper Series. 

In this third edition of the Working Paper series for 2009, Neil Duxbury (WP11/2009) analysies the judicial style of Lord Wright, arguing that he was an 'innovative traditionalist' who believed in the duty of judges to be creative, but within the framework of existing legal authority; Nico Krisch (WP12/2009) explores the normative status of constitutionalism and pluralism to act as paradigms for the structure of the post national legal order, arguing that the multiplicity of loyalties and allegiances which characterise the global polity are better reflected in a pluralist rather than a constitutionalist order; Andrew Scott (WP13/2009) examines the recent use of the Protection from Harrassment Act 1997 by celebreties against the paparazzi. He highlights a number of factors which explain why the Act is only now being used and reflects on the likely interplay of legal and regulatory avenues for the protection of privacy in the future; Julia Black (WP14/2009) explores the role of legitimacy in the competition for regulatory share, distinguishing export based from import based regulatory competition, and arguing that to understand the role legitimacy plays, it needs to be reconceptualised as an endowment, rather than an attribute or resource; Andrew Lang (WP15/2009) explores the relationship between law and knowledge in the international trade of services, tracing the ways in which law and legal processes have been present in processes of knowledge production, shaping the way the global economy is imagined and its dynamics understood; and finally Claire Kilpatrick (WP16/2009) explores the ECJ's new approach to the posting of workers to other Member States in the light of recent UK industrial action. She identifies and probes four doctrinal positions, and argues that the new approach can produce outcomes which are doctrinally dubious, and politically and socially undesirable and inflammable.

 

7 July 2009

Spanish law firm Gómez-Acebo & Pombo to support Law and Financial Markets Project

Spanish law firm Gómez-Acebo & Pombo to support Law and Financial Markets Project Leading Spanish firm, Gómez-Acebo & Pombo Abogados, will become Foundation Sponsors of the LSE Law and Financial Markets Project (LFMP), LSE announced this week (Tuesday 7 July).

The Law and Financial Markets Project carries out research into how law and regulation serve and interact with, financial market activity. It aims to provide a framework for collaboration between lawyers in the commercial world and those in academic institutions. As a Foundation Sponsor, Gómez-Acebo & Pombo will support the project – both financially and professionally - initially over a three year period.

[read more ...]

 

1 July 2009

2009 WG Hart Legal Workshop on ‘Law Reform and Financial Markets’

LSE Law Department continues to contribute to the international regulatory and policy debate on the financial crisis. The Law Department was closely involved with the 2009 WG Hart Legal Workshop (23-25 June) which this year considered the timely theme of ‘Law Reform and Financial Markets’ with Professor Niamh Moloney and Dr Joanna Benjamin members of the Organising Committee, together with Professor Eilís Ferran, Cambridge and Professor Kern Alexander, Queen Mary. The two and a half day Workshop, which was supported by the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Cambridge Finance, and the ESRC’s World Economy & Finance Research Programme, sought to consider and challenge the current international regulatory reform movement and to probe the complexities and risks of law reform in the financial markets. It opened with a Plenary Lecture by LSE alumnus Sean Hagan, General Counsel of the IMF, chaired by LSE Director Sir Howard Davies. A series of Plenary Sessions followed during which a range of distinguished speakers from the international academic, regulatory (the Bank for International Settlements, BaFin (the German market supervisor), CONSOB (the Italian market supervisor), the European Commission, the US Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the FSA, and the Swiss National Bank were all represented), and practitioner communities debated the financial crisis and law reform. The complexities of legal intervention in the financial markets were discussed in panel sessions over the following two days, with participants including LSE alumnus Richard Heckinger of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. The Workshop was characterized by wide-ranging and stimulating debate on a range of issues of central importance to the current international reform movement, including how best to redesign regulation, the international dimension of regulation, and the role of private law in financial markets.

 

 

30 June 2009

Jan KleinheisterkampDr Kleinheisterkamp on EU Law in investment arbitration cases

Dr Jan Kleinheisterkamp has been quoted in the Financial Times in an article on the conflict between investment treaty claims and EC law prohibiting state aids. This is a topical problem that is arising in a number of ongoing arbitrations recently brought against new European member states by investors. Subsidies and other benefits that attracted them to invest had to be scrapped as part of the preparation for accession to the European Union. Dr Kleinheisterkamp specialises on international arbitration and has previously worked in the field of state aid law.

[click here for the full FT article]

 

30 June 2009

New books from the department : Corporate Insolvency Law: perspectives and principles (Cambridge University Press) and Company Law in Context  (Oxford University Press)

Professor Vanessa Finch has published the second edition of Corporate Insolvency Law. The first edition proposed a fundamentally revised concept of insolvency law, intended to serve corporate as well as broader social ends. This second edition takes on board a host of changes that have subsequently reshaped insolvency law and practice, notably the consolidation of the rescue culture in the UK, the rise of the pre-packaged administration and the substantial replacement of administrative receivership with administration. It also considers the implications of recent and dramatic changes in the provision and trading of credit, the movement of an increasing amount of 'insolvency work' to the pre-formal insolvency stage of corporate affairs and the arrival, on the insolvency scene, of a new cadre of specialists in corporate turnaround. Looking to the future, Vanessa Finch argues that changes of approach are needed if insolvency law is to develop with coherence and purpose, and she offers a framework for such an approach.

[click here for the publisher's site]

Company Law in Context - coverDr David Kershaw has published Company Law in Context : Text and Materials, carefully designed to provide students with the economic, business, and social context in which company law operates, enabling them to understand its application and relevance. Dr Kershaw provides detailed up-to-date commentary with selected extracts from company law source materials, and covers key cases in depth, enabling students to engage critically with judgments, issues, and policies. Sample chapters may be viewed online, in addition to a video podcast by the author.

[click here for publisher's site]

 

 

30 June 2009

Dr Hoffmann's project explores human rights and dignity

Florian HoffmanA research paper on Dignity – a Special Focus on Vulnerable Groups, coordinated by Florian Hoffmann (LSE) and Frédéric Mégret (McGill University) and produced by a group of researchers from across the globe is one of the contributions to the ‘Swiss Initiative to Commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights’, launched in Geneva in December 2008. Instigated and funded by the Swiss government, actively supported by the governments of Austria and Norway, and coordinated by the Geneva Academy for International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights, the Initiative tasked a Panel of Eminent Persons, chaired by Mary Robinson and Paulo Sérgio Pinheiro, to elaborate an Agenda for Human Rights which identified core themes and challenges for human rights in the future. The Panel then commissioned eight research papers on these themes, with special emphasis being placed on ‘human dignity’ and a ‘world human rights court’, of which Dignity is one. The Agenda has been presented to the UN community in New York and Geneva, and it is further planned to launch it at the regional level, including the OAS and the Council of Europe.

[click to read more about the Swiss Initiative]

 

30 June 2009

LSE hosts ATLAS Agora 2009

The Association of Transnational Law Schools (ATLAS) is a consortium of institutions of higher education from around the world dedicated to the intellectual formation of highly talented doctoral students and fostering reflection and research on issues broadly related, but not limited, to comparative legal and regulatory responses to various forces of globalization, international governance challenges and the evolution of transnational law It is the first of its kind in the world. There are 10 ATLAS partner institutions. As of ATLAS’ inaugural year of 2008, the ATLAS partner institutions were: London School of Economics and Political Science, New York University, Osgoode Hall Law School of York University (Toronto), University of Cape Town, Universidad de Deusto (Bilbao), University of Melbourne, and Université de Montréal. As of 2009, Bucerius Law School (Hamburg) and Bar-Ilan University (Tel Aviv) have joined and, as of 2010, the National University of Singapore.
    This year, the annual Agora, the showpiece of Atlas is being hosted at the LSE Law Department. It will involve 40 students from these institutions coming together for two weeks to present their research, listen to cutting edge research by LSE staff and to develop their research methodology.

[click here for more about ATLAS]

 

30 June 2009

Professor Jonathan Fisher, QC, on short selling

Jonathan Fisher QC, Visiting Professor, considers the ethics of insider trading and short selling in an article in the Daily Telegraph.

[click here to read the full Telegraph article]

 

17 June 2009

Professor Conor Gearty kicks off 'Stories from LSE'

Professor Conor GeartyLSE has launched a series of films celebrating the School through individual stories. From the committed professor to the professional musician, Stories from LSE gives an insight into life at LSE through the tales of people who study and work here.

In the first of an initial series of three films, Professor Conor Gearty, professor of law and head of human rights at LSE, talks of his passion for teaching – and what makes teaching at LSE so special. 'One of the remarkable features of a successful institution such as LSE's department of law is that…most of the colleagues are teaching stuff of which they are a part and that makes for good teaching at university level,' he argues, as the film follows him from lecture theatre to Matrix Chambers, where he is a founding member and practising barrister.

[click here for the full story]

 

 

Damian Chalmers9 June 2009

Professor Chalmers on EU law and 'disobeying Brussels'

Professor of EU Law, Damian Chalmers, head of the European Institute, writes in the Times (5 June) on how popular opposition to particular legislation, within the United Kingdom, could be addressed by 'a body that helps us to assess when EU law has gone too far'.

[click here for the full Times article]

 

 

3 June 2009

LLM student receives Qatar scholarship

LLM student Yang Zhao has received the inaugural Future Leaders in Law scholarship, funded by the sponsorship of Sir William Blair and Lady Katy Blair. After graduating from LSE, he will spend a year assisting the justices at the Qatar Financial Center Civil and Commercial Court in Doha.

 

27 May 2009

Helen Greer award goes to LSE Library

The Helen Greer award acknowledges a European Documentation Centre (EDC) librarian who has made a particularly outstanding contribution to EDC librarianship. This year the award went to Maria Bell, LSE liaison librarian for law and the European Institute. Paul Clarke, chairman of the European Information Association (EIA) said: 'In choosing Maria to be the 2009 recipient, the judges recognised her valuable work not just during 2008 but over a period of time.'

Maria, who has worked in the Library since 1997, also manages the European Documentation Centre that is housed within the Library. The EDC holds official EU documents and publications spanning the whole history of the European Union for the academic community. Maria also provides assistance and guidance in tracing EU documentation for LSE staff and students. As an extension of her role, Maria also works with the European Commission and European Information Association (EIA) training information professionals in understanding and using EU information resources.

 

27 May 2009

UN Gaza team will go ahead

A U.N. investigation into possible war crimes in Israel and Gaza will go ahead with or without Israel's cooperation, the chief investigator has commented. The investigating team, ordered by the U.N. Human Rights Council, includes Professor Christine Chinkin.

[click here for the full Fox News article]

 

27 May 2009

MPs' expenses and the law

Professor Jonathan Fisher, QC, writes in the Times on the legality of MPs expenses' claims, in light of the current parliamentary scandal.

[click here for the full Times article]

 

 

19 May 2009

International Conference on African Great Lakes Pact - 29 & 30 May 2009

The International Humanitarian Law Project will be hosting an international conference on the Pact on Stability, Security and Development which entered into force in December 2006. The 11 member states of the Pact include Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The Pact represents the most comprehensive effort yet by the member states to address the root causes of the conflicts in the Great Lakes region and to lay the foundations for sustainable peace and development.
    The focus of the conference will be on issues surrounding implementation and enforcement of the Pact. Confirmed speakers include:Moses Wetang'ula, Kenyan Foreign Minister & ICGLR RIMC Chair; Ambassador Liberata Mulamula, Executive Secretary of ICGLR; Hamuli Baudouin, DRC National Coordinator for ICGLR; Lieutenant Colonel Michael Gibson, Former Military Criminal Law Advisor, MONUC; Stephen Singo, Co-ordinator for the Peace and Security cluster, Great Lakes Secretariat; Pascal Turlan, Office of the Prosecutor, ICC; Isabell Kempt, Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights; Anneke Van Woudenburg, Human Rights Watch, Chaloka Beyani, LSE/Legal Adviser to the ICGLR.
    To view the conference flyer, or register for the conference, please click here
 

19 May 2009

Professor Jonathan Fisher, QC, appointed Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Taxation

Jonathan Fisher QCIn a rare accolade, Jonathan Fisher QC, Visiting Professor, and one of the country’s leading barristers in fraud and financial crime cases, has been appointed a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Taxation and afforded the professional qualification of “chartered tax adviser”, making him one of very few Fellows, if not the first, to come from a criminal background.
    The qualification, more usually attained by stringent examinations, is regarded as the gold
standard amongst tax practitioners.The Institute invited Mr Fisher to apply for fellowship, mindful of the significant role he has played in tax investigation cases during his professional career. In addition to appearing as an advocate in many leading tax fraud cases, Mr Fisher is frequently involved in cases where tax issues arise in the application of the anti-money laundering regime.
    Commenting upon his appointment, Mr Fisher said: “I am delighted to accept this honour from the Chartered Institute of Taxation. The Government has become increasingly aggressive in its approach towards tax enforcement and the line between lawful tax avoidance and dishonest tax evasion has become blurred. The tax system must be developed in a manner which is fair to both Government and the taxpayer alike and the Institute plays an important role in helping to achieve this goal”.
    In a 20,000 word thesis written for the Institute, Mr Fisher strongly criticised the Government for using the anti-money laundering disclosure regime to clamp down on lawful tax avoidance practices when under the terms of the law it is only cases of suspected dishonest tax evasion which need to be reported.

 

19 May 2009

Lord Grabiner, QC to be made honorary fellow

Lord Grabiner of Aldwych, an alumnus of the Law Department, is a commercial lawyer and one of the UK's leading barristers. Made a Queen's Counsel in 1981, he became a Bencher in 1989, and a Recorder (judge) of the Crown Court between 1990 and 1999. He has been a Deputy High Court Judge since 1994, and non-executive chairman of the Arcadia Group Ltd since 2002. He was non-executive director of Next plc in 2002, and member of the Bank of England Financial Services Law Committee from 2002-05. He was created a life peer in July 1999. A graduate of LSE, Lord Grabiner was chair of the Court of Governors of LSE from 1998 until 2007. His honorary fellowship will be presented at the university's graduation ceremony in July.

 

12 May 2009

President Atta Mills of Ghana visits LSE

John Atta Mills, LSE Alumnus, President of GhanaThe Law Department was delighted to play host to President Atta Mills of Ghana last week. The President is the third Ghanaian alumnus of the school to become Head of State of Ghana, after Dr Kwame Nkrumah and Dr Hilla Limann. There are about 270 Ghanaian alumni of the LSE. Speaking to staff and students including a large number of Ghanaians, President Mills recalled his days at the school where he studied for his Law LLM in 1968: "It is nice to be back. I recall with nostalgia when in 1967, I enrolled here to read law. I am grateful for the opportunity offered me to acquire knowledge and very proud to be associated with LSE."

[click here for full article from the Ghanaian Times]

 

12 May 2009

Two lecturers in jurisprudence appointed

We are pleased to announce the appointment of two new members of staff:

Kristen Rundle obtained an LLB from the University of Sydney, an LLM from McGill University and has recently submitted her doctoral thesis with the title 'Forms Liberate: Reclaiming the legal Philosophy of Lon L Fuller' at the University of Toronto. At the University of Toronto, she has taught courses called 'Law and the Holocaust' and 'The Rule of Law', and previously at the University of Sydney she also taught Administrative Law. Her most noteworthy publication to date is 'The Impossibility of an Exterminatory Legality: Law and the Holocaust' (2009) 59 University of Toronto Law Journal 65. Kristen will mainly be teaching in the field of Jurisprudence, but hopes also to make a contribution to administrative law.

Gregoire Webber obtained an LLB and BCL at McGill University, and then his D.Phil entitled 'Limitation of Constitutional Rights as a Negotiating of Political Legitimacy' at Balliol College, Oxford. He has been law clerk to the Honourable Justice W. ian C. Binnie of the Supreme Court of Canada and his present job is senior policy adviser in the Privy Council Office for Canada (the equivalent to the Cabinet Office in the UK) where he has been advising the government on 'constitutional policy'. His first monograph, The Negotiable Constiution: On the Limitation of Rights, is due to be published shortly by Cambridge UP. Gregoire will mainly be teaching in the field of Jurisprudence, but hopes also to make a contribution to constitutional theory and human rights law.

 

12 May 2009

Prof Jackson on BBC's Unreliable Evidence

Prof Emily JacksonProfessor Emily Jackson recently appeared on BBC Radio 4's Unreliable Evidence, in a programme entitled 'The Law and the Unborn,'  considering legal and ethical controversies around fertilization, cloning, surrogacy and abortion.

[click here for the programme website]

 

 

 

5 May 2009

LSE Team excels at International Commercial Arbitration Moot

This year’s LSE Team performed extraordinarily well at the Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot, which took place on 3-10 April in Vienna. The five team members Johannes Kater, Kira Krissinel, Sara Nadeau-Séguin, Manuel Penadés Fons, and Mumuksha Singh were coached by Annabelle Möckesch (an experienced former Vis mooter) and supervised by Dr Jan Kleinheisterkamp. This year’s team is the first LSE team to participate in the final rounds of the Vis Moot, after finishing 13th out of 228 teams in the general rounds. In the final rounds, the LSE team defeated the team from New York University before having to bow to the University of Aarhus. At the final awards ceremony, the LSE team obtained an honourable mention for its memorandum for respondent, which is proof of the Team’s hard work that went into the preparation. Special congratulations go to Ms. Sara Nadeau-Séguin, who obtained a honourable mention for her pleading (140/150), as well as Ms. Mumuksha Singh, who scored an average of 141/150 (the maximum obtained in the competition being 144/150) but was ineligible for a honourable mention due to the strategic order of the pleadings. The Law Department congratulates the entire team for a brilliant performance and wishes to thank the Team’s sponsors, WilmerHale and CMS Cameron McKenna for their financial support.

 

 from left to right: Kira Krissinel, Johannes Kater, Annabelle Möckesch,
Manuel Penadés Fons, Sara Nadeau-Séguin, Mumuksha Singh

 

5 May 2009

Professor Susan marks appointed Chair in Public International Law

International Law on the LeftThe department is delighted to announce that Professor Susan Marks has accepted our offer of a Chair in Public International Law, commencing in January 2010. Susan is currently professor of public international law at King's College London, and she previously lectured at the University of Cambridge. She obtained her first law degree from the University of Sydney, where she also trained as a solicitor. She obtained an LLM and PhD from the University of Cambridge. Her books include The Riddle of All Constitutions (OUP, 2000) and International law on the Left: Re-examining Marxist Legacies (CUP, 2008). Her published research is primarily theoretical in character, with a focus on contemporary issues and debates. She has examined the ideas and concepts that inform international legal argument about democracy, poverty and human rights. She is currently working on a book with the provisional title: The Ticking Bomb and Other Modern Myths.

 

28 April 2009

Prof Snyder publishes new book on Europe and China

The European Union and China - coverProfessor Snyder has published his latest title The European Union and China, 1949-2008 : Basic Documents and Commentary. It forms a comprehensive reference book and commentary on basic documents about relations between the EU and the People's Republic of China from 1949 to the present. It contains all significant official and unofficial documents in English and Chinese about EU-China relations since the founding of the PRC in 1949. Since the opening-up of China in 1979, and especially after the establishment of the EU in 1992, relations between the EU and China have developed apace. Today the EU and China are 'strategic partners', with a very broad-based relationship, extending far beyond trade to encompass a growing number of important economic, political, social and cultural domains. The relationship is certain to gain in importance with increasing globalisation, EU expansion, Chinese membership of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), the renewal and development of China, and changes in the international trading system and international politics. This book provides an indispensable foundation for teaching, research, policy-making and advising on EU-China relations. It includes both documents originally published in English and English translations of documents previously available only in Chinese, French or Portuguese.

[click here for publisher's site]

 

21 April 2009

Prof Reiner on G20 video footage

Professor of Criminology Robert Reiner was quoted today by the BBC in a magazine article discussing the use of video recording by both public and police at the recent G20 protests.

[click here to read the full article]

 

7 April 2009

LSE expert contributes to E-coli Inquiry

A paper by Professor of Risk Regulation Bridget Hutter (CARR) and Dr Tola Amodu (currently a guest teacher in the Law Department) has formed part of the public inquiry into a major outbreak of E-coli 0157 in South Wales that claimed the life of a young child and hospitalised many others in 2005. The inquiry, chaired by Professor Hugh Pennington, reported its findings in March. It laid the blame for the outbreak on J E Tudor and Son’s Ltd abattoir where it was found that meat hygiene regulations had neither been enforced nor followed. Professor Hutter’s paper sets out the key principles of food hygiene regulation in the UK and looks at enforcement and compliance.

[read more on the CARR site]

 

7 April 2009

LSE graduate wins competition to find country's top student negotiators

Former LSE law student Charlotte Whitehorn has won a national competition to find the country's toughest student negotiators. Charlotte, who is now studying at The College of Law, and her team-mate Charles Shoebridge beat stiff competition from law schools around the country to win the national final of The Negotiation Competition. The event organisers said that they were the clear winners out of the 12 teams that took part.  The pair will now represent England and Wales and The College of Law in the International Negotiation Competition to be held in Chicago in July.

 

 

1 April 2009

Christopher Greenwood, QC, ICJ Judge

Christopher Greenwood's career is profiled in the Law Society Gazette, following his move from the Department of Law to the International Court of Justice.

[click here for the LSG article in full]

 

 

 

1 April 2009

Professor Klug on the Human Rights Act

Professorial Research Fellow Francesca Klug comments in the Guardian on the Human Rights Act: 'Bills of rights are instruments for protection but are not a substitute for politics. Most human rights campaigners sensibly argue that our attention should be focused on protecting the HRA from those who would use the figleaf of a British bill of rights and responsibilities to undermine the rights it protects ...'

[click here for the Guardian article in full]

 

1 April 2009

The Sale of Goods by Michael Bridge

Professor Michael Bridge has just published the second edition of this work,  updated and expanded to incorporate significant new case law relating to damages and the Sale of Goods Act 1979 and the transposition of the European Directive on Guarantees in Consumer Sales. New material includes discussion of exemption clauses, penalty clauses and documentary letters of credit, and full account is taken of the Sale and Supply of Goods to Consumer Regulations 2002 and the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008. New appendices contain a selection of valuable reference materials, including The Sale of Goods Act 1979.

[click here for publisher's site]

 

25 March 2009

Law undergraduate in book charity exposé

Law undergraduate Nizar Manek has recently uncovered some uncomfortable truths about the charity Humana People-to-People / DAPP-UK, and its purported donations of books to Malawi, which have led to London School of Economics excluding it from its recycling programme. The organisation, which supplies second-hand textbooks to Africa, seemingly retains 90% of its proceeds in administrative costs and has become embroiled in large-scale fraud allegations in Europe, involving embezzlement and untaxed income. On Wednesday April 15, 12.30, Nizar will be interviewed on on BBC Radio 4's You and Yours on the subject of DAPP-UK and charities' irregularity.

[read The Beaver, Tuesday 17 March, for an in-depth article:

 ‘LSE Reuse Scheme sends sham charity to recycling bin after investigation’]
 

 

24 March 2009

Prof Conor Gearty on freedom and liberty

Professor Conor Gearty writes in the New Statesman this week on the question of whether our rights are being eroded by the state: 'The idea that the state is an unwarranted assault on individual freedom is not a progressive one. This kind of libertarianism works to protect privilege by cloaking the advantages of the rich in the garb of personal autonomy, individual freedom and the “human right” to privacy.'

[read the New Statesman article in full]

 

17 March 2009

'Rebuilding Confidence in Financial Markets'

On Thursday 12 March the Law and Financial Markets Project of the LSE hosted a one day conference title 'Rebuilding Confidence in Financial Markets’. Confidence in all aspects of the UK’s system of financial regulation and its private law architecture for financial transactions has been severely tested by the ongoing financial crisis. This timely conference brought together leading market participants, regulators and academics to examine the relative roles of public and private actors in the causes, handling of, and responses to the credit crisis and to discuss what their roles should be in the future course of financial markets regulation. The conference was held under Chatham House Rules however an unattributed transcript will be made available through the Law and Financial Markets Project.

 

Chaloka Beyani17 March 2009

Dr Beyani to be member of Kenyan Constitutional Review Committee

The President of the Republic of Kenya has appointed Dr Chaloka Beyani, Senior Lecturer in International Law in the Law Department at LSE, to be an international member of the Constitutional Review Committee of Kenya. Dr Beyani was nominated by Koffi Annan's Panel of Eminent African Personalities in their capacity as official mediators in Kenya after the crisis that followed the disputed elections in 2007. Prior to being appointed by the President, Dr Beyani's nomination was ratified by the Parliament of Kenya. He joins three other international experts who will serve on the Committee alongside six Kenyan experts. The task of the Committee is to produce a harmonised Constitution for Kenya on the basis of existing drafts and to achieve national consensus on the Constitution. Congratulations to Chaloka on this great distinction and his recognition as one of the foremost peacemakers in Africa.

 

16  March 2009

Prof Hartley comments on RBS

Emeritus Professor Trevor Hartley was interviewed today regarding the plans of some pension funds to sue RBS over lost money.

 

10 March 2009

Professor Gearty awarded Roehampton honour

Professor Conor Gearty has been awarded an honorary doctorate by Roehampton University for his exceptional work and contribution to Human Rights. Professor of Human Rights Law and Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights at the London School of Economics, Prof Gearty is also a founding member of the barristers' chambers Matrix. An expert in terrorism and civil liberties, Prof Gearty has been an informal adviser to the Labour Party for many years, including helping define Labour’s approach to the problem of political violence in Northern Ireland and advising Tony Blair on terrorism law during the 1990s. Additionally, he has had an association with Roehampton University for several years, as a member of the Advisory Board of Crucible, the University’s centre for education in human rights, social justice and citizenship.

[click for the press release]

 

9 March 2009

Jack Straw, Justice Secretary, at LSE

Jack Straw appeared in the Department's Officers of the Law lecture series on the 3 March, and his speech was covered by The Times, highlighting the Justice Secretary's comments on the 'astonishing growth' of legal aid payments.

[listen to the podcast of this lecture]

[read the full Times report]

 

4 March 2009

Student success in international competition

On 20-22 February, a team of mooters (Mohbuba Choudhury, Lucy Demery, Tara O'Leary,  Anthony Nicholls and Nausheen Rahman) competed in the UK National Rounds of the Philip C. Jessup International Law moot organised by the International Law Students Association.
    Rather uniquely, this year's team had already mooted before some famous personalities, having put on displays at the Queen's opening of the New Academic Building and an alumni reception. They were also put through their paces by numerous faculty members - this stood them in good stead when facing benches of Jessup veterans and experts in the field.
    After convincing victories in all four preliminary rounds, the team proceeded to the semi-finals where they faced King's College London. After a high-quality and gruelling round, the LSE team were declared the unanimous victors. They were congratulated on their professional manner
as well as the technical precision of their answers.
    The team will now proceed to the international finals, to be held on 22-28 March in Washington DC. We are confident that they will be excellent ambassadors for the LSE and look forward to their continued success in the remaining stages of the competition.
 

Jessup Moot Team

pictured above, from left to right:

front row: Tara O'Leary, Nausheen Rahman.

second row: Mohbuba Choudhury, Anthony Nicholls, Lucy Demery,
Aleksandra Bojovic [coach], Zoe Fiander [coach]

 

 

3 March 2009

Public Law Society at the LSE

The newly-founded LSE Public Law Society will discuss current issues in public law in practice and encourage comparative public law analysis. The discussion forums will meet once a term.  The Patron is the Rt. Hon. Lord Justice Sir Stephen Sedley QC; Chairman: Professor Martin Loughlin; Director & Administrator: Abhijit Pandya.

Our first event is on Monday 11th May, Bancoult and Judicial Review of the Royal Prerogative Discussion forum. Chair The Rt. Hon. Lord Justice Sedley. Speakers include Professor Paul Craig QC and Professor TRS Allan.

[for further details, please email A.P.Pandya@lse.ac.uk]

 

3 March 2009

Dr Tatiana Flessas on BBC News

LSE law lecturer Dr Tatiana Flessas, an expert on cultural property and heritage law, spoke yesterday to BBC News on the subject of the recent auction of looted Chinese bronze artworks. The auction was sabotaged by a Chinese bidder who has refused to pay. Dr Flessas remarked that it was important to focus attention on the ongoing trade in looted objects.

[click here for the full news story]

 

3 March 2009

Law Department hosts policy workshop on libel tourism

The Department of Law recently hosted an international policy forum on the phenomenon of 'libel tourism', motivated in part by moves in the United States - at both State and Federal levels - to introduce blocking statutes to preclude the enforcement of overseas libel judgments. Speakers at the workshop included Mark Jackson (General Counsel, Dow Jones, NY), John Walsh (Senior Counsel, Carter Ledyard & Milbourne), Paul Tweed (Johnsons Solicitors) and Mark Stephens (Finers Stephens Innocent). Participants from the Department of Law included Jacco Bomhoff and Professor Trevor Hartley. The event was chaired by Dr Andrew Scott.
    The participants at the workshop were: John Battle (Head of Legal, ITN); Charlie Beckett (Director, Polis); Jacco Bomhoff; Alastair Brett (Legal Manager, Times Newspapers Ltd); Desmond Browne QC (5 Raymond Buildings, Chairman of Bar Council of England and Wales); Paisley Dodds (Chief of London Bureau, Associated Press); Tracey Garratty (Clerk of the Commons Culture, Media and Sport Committee); Jo Glanville (Editor, Index on Censorship); Charles Glasser (Bloomberg News, New York); Professor Roy Greenslade (Guardian and City University); Professor Trevor Hartley; Jonathan Heawood (Director, English PEN); Mark Jackson; Professor Andrew Kenyon (University of Melbourne); Stevie Loughrey (Carter Ruck); Edward Lucas (The Economist); Amber Melville Brown (Withers LLP); Gavin Millar QC (Doughty Street Chambers); Peter Noorlander (Media Legal Defence Initiative); Kelli Sager (Davis,Wright,Tremaine LLP, Los Angeles); Keith Schilling (Schillings); David Schulz (Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz LLP, New York); Andrew Scott; Mark Stephens; Nigel Tait (Carter Ruck); Damian Tambini (Media Dept, LSE); David Tomlin (Asst General Counsel, Associated Press, New York); Paul Tweed; John Walsh; Paul Wright (Attorney at Law, Malibu), and John Whittingdale MP (Chair of the Commons Culture, Media and Sport Committee).

 

 

25 February 2009

Latest podcasts

Two of our recent public lectures are now available in audio: Professor Marco Sassòli on 'IHL and International Human Rights Law in Non-International Armed Conflicts'  and Professor Christopher Greenwood, QC, on 'Can International Law Change the World?'

'IHL and International Human Rights Law'    [listen to the mp3]

'Can International Law Change the World?'  [listen to the mp3]

24 February 2009

champagne pictureDepartment toasts its RAE success!

The department recently celebrated its outstanding achievement in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (how the Government measures the quality of research in UK universities) with a party, at which we also bid goodbye to Professor Christopher Greenwood, QC, who has now taken up his post at the International Court of Justice. Professor Hugh Collins, head of Department, noted that LSE topped the Law rankings in every assessment of the RAE results, establishing a 'quantum difference' between the department and its competitors.

 

24 February 2009

Legal Biography Project: 'Biographical Dimensions of Holmes's The Common Law'

On 3 March. G. Edward White, David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia and the author of Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes: Law and the Inner Self (OUP, 1993), will talk about the jurisprudential perspective Holmes adopts in his book, The Common Law, paying particular attention to the question of how one goes about placing a very well known book within a biography of a historical figure.

[click here for the Legal Biography Project]

 

19 February 2009

Dr Beyani on BBC's Have Your Say

Chaloka Beyani took part in a live programme discussing the International Criminal Court in Africa yesterday.

[click here for the Have Your Say website]

 

18 February 2009

LSE and LCIA launch Commentary on UNIDROIT Principles on 26 February

Commentary onf the UNIDROIT Principles - coverTogether with the London Court of International Arbitration (LCIA), the LSE Law Department commemorates the publication of the Commentary on the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts (OUP February 2009), co-edited by Dr Jan Kleinheisterkamp, with a round table discussion that brings together practitioners and academics. Speakers will include, in addition to contributors of the research project, eminent specialists such as The Rt Hon Lord Mustill, Jan Paulsson (President LCIA), Constantine Partasides (Freshfields), Hilary Heilbronn QC, Audley Sheppard (Clifford Chance), Kenneth Rokison QC, VV Veeder QC, Professor Michael Bridge (LSE) and Toby Landau QC. For further information please contact conferences@lcia.org . A similar event is organised together with the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) in Paris on 25 February, including speaker such as Professor François Terré and Professor Pierre Mayer.

[click here for the publisher’s site]

 

17 February 2009

Dr Scott briefs Select Committee on libel law

Andrew ScottAndrew Scott, senior lecturer in law, recently briefed members of the House of Commons Select Committee on Culture, Media and Sport on UK libel law at a half-day workshop. The session was held in advance of the Committee's inquiry into Press Standards, Privacy and Libel Law. Other participants were Sir Charles Gray (recently retired High Court judge), Andrew Caldecott QC (1 Brick Court Chambers), Desmond Browne QC (Chairman of the Bar Council), Alasdair Pepper and Nigel Tait (both Carter-Ruck).

[more about this Select Committee inquiry]

 

17 February 2009

Great Lakes summit - latest

Chaloka BeyaniOn Saturday 31 January, Dr Chaloka Beyani participated in the Special Summit of the Heads of State and Government of the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region, held in Addis Ababa. The summit examined the developments in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and a communiqué of the summit was prepared.
    On 2-3 February, the Summit of the Heads of State and Government of the African Union was held in Addis Ababa. The summit agreed to establish a Union Government Authority that will replace the African Union Commission. Dr Chaloka Beyani served as a member of the African Union Panel of Eminent African Personalities that drew up the conceptual framework of a Union Government for the African Union.

 

12 February 2009

Prof Michael Zander on LSE in '67

Emeritus Professor Michael Zander, QC, was quoted in today's Times Higher article on 'children of the revolution', recalling student protests at LSE in 1967.

[click here for full article]

 

4 February 2009

Andrew Murray criticises internet pornography law

Andrew Murray, Reader in Law, one of Britain's leading experts on internet law, has criticised the government's latest attempt to control the availability of extreme internet pornography through a new law known as Section 63 of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008, which came into force last week. He believes that  the law, which aims to crack down on images that mix sex and violence or which portray necrophilia or bestiality will be impossible to enforce as intended. Instead, it will be used by police to prosecute consenting adults who indulge in fetishes such as bondage, dominance and sado-masochism (BDSM).

[read the full news article, and Andrew Murray's article in the Modern Law Review]

 

4 February 2009

Linklaters moot

A new prize moot competition commenced this year, taking advantage of our splendid Moot Court Room. Linklaters LLP offered a first prize of a paid vacation placement, with a prize for the runner up of £200. The competition, held on 30 January, was attached to the Commercial Contracts course for second year students. The moot question involved the breaking off of negotiations for a franchise contract in bad faith. Pictured are the finalists in the competition, from left to right: Leonard Chew, Stefan Farahani (runner up), Sam Lintonbon (winner), and Jacqeline Park, together with the judges Professor Hugh Collins and Alexandra Marks, recruiting partner at Linklaters and part-time judge. Thanks also to Aashni Dalal, mooting officer, for keeping time and taking the photo!

 

4 February 2009

LSE Executive Summer School 2009

The LSE has just launched its new Executive Summer School: this programme of intensive one-week, small group, courses is designed for professionals with at least two years work experience and who wish to develop their breadth of corporate knowledge. Courses include Leadership, Negotiation, Banking and Advanced Issues in EU Company Law.

[click here for more information]

 

3 February 2009

LSE Space for Thought Literary Weekend, Friday 27 February to Sunday 1 March 2009

A copy of the programme for LSE's first ever literary festival is now available to download on the LSE Literary Weekend website.
    This exciting series of events will explore the interaction between the arts and social sciences with speakers including Mohsin Hamid, Nicholas Hytner, Tim Parks, Professor Lord Anthony Giddens, Antony Gormley, Victoria Glendinning, D J Taylor, Michael Holroyd, Martin Rowson, Alistair Beaton, Ben Okri, Iain Sinclair and Will Self.

[click here for the programme]
 

 

3 February 2009

Brrrr.

Cold weather has affected LSE these last couple of days, with heavy snow and ice causing cancellation of teaching and rescheduling of some events. Some staff and students, however, have been hard at work ...

 

 

 

 

20 January 2009

IHL Project to host Great Lakes Region Conference, May 2009

The Great Lakes Region in Central Africa has been the site of the most devastating armed conflicts and humanitarian crises the world has witnessed since the end of the Cold War. The Great Lakes Pact, adopted by eleven African states in December 2006, represents the most comprehensive effort yet to address the root causes of these conflicts and lay the foundations for sustainable peace and development in the region. In September 2007, the International Humanitarian Law Project at the London School of Economics and Political Science held a Symposium to discuss the content of the Pact and its Protocols. The follow-up Conference on 29-30 May 2009, The Great Lakes Pact - Two Years On: Issues of Implementation and Enforcement, will focus on the implementation and enforcement of the Protocols. Individuals who played an integral role in drafting the Pact and Protocols as well as those responsible for its implementation have been invited to participate during the course of the first day. The second day has been specifically set aside for the scholarly community to offer critical input and engage with those responsible for the implementation and enforcement of the Pact.   The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 1 March 2009.

[read the Conference's Call for Papers in full]

 

20 January 2009

John Atta Mills, LSE Alumnus, President of GhanaJohn Atta Mills, LSE Alumnus, President of Ghana

Former LSE student John Atta Mills, leader of the National Democratic Congress, has become President of Ghana. The 64 year old, who served as vice president from 1997-2000, completed an LLM at LSE in 1967-68.

He was inaugurated on 7 January 2009, having defeated the ruling party candidate Nana Akufo-Addo by a 50.23 per cent – 49.77 per cent vote in the 2008 election.

[click here for more information]

 

20 January 2009

Professor Gearty a guest on the BBC's Thinking Allowed
BBC Radio 4, 14 Jan 2009

'MORAL RELATIVISM Different cultures have different beliefs, so what gives us the right to judge the behaviour of other people in a world where moralities often conflict? Is there a universal human standard of right and wrong, or does culture explain and excuse behaviour that other peoples might find abhorrent? How should the anthropologist understand cannibalism? Can a cultural context excuse female genital mutilation?
    Laurie Taylor is joined by Professor Steven Lukes, author of a book on moral relativism, Henrietta Moore, Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Cambridge and Professor Conor Gearty, Professor of Human Rights Law at the London School of Economics, to discuss relationship of culture and morality in the debate on a universal notion of human rights.'

[click here to listen to the programme]

 

14 January 2009

Lectureship in Trusts Law

In Autumn 2008, the Department of Law at the London School of Economics moved to new premises, on Lincoln's Inn Fields. As we enter this exciting phase of our development, we are keen to make new appointments to develop further our research portfolio and support our undergraduate and postgraduate programmes.

The Department of Law, a world-leading centre for research and teaching in legal studies and interdisciplinary approaches to law, ranked first in the Research and Assessment Exercise, seeks to make an appointment in the area of trusts law, commencing no later than 1 September 2009.

We invite applications from strong candidates, with both a record in research (evidencing strong research potential) and teaching experience in any area of trusts law. We encourage the development of teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels and all members of the Department's academic staff are expected to contribute to core undergraduate teaching.

[click here for full details of this vacancy]

 

14 January 2009

International lawyers speak out on Gaza

Dr Louise Arimatsu, Dr Chaloka Beyani, Dr Nico Krisch and Professor Gerry Simpson are amongst signatories to a letter in today's Guardian calling on the Government to consider its duty under international law to exert its influence to stop violations of international humanitarian law in the current conflict between Israel and Hamas.

[read the Guardian letter in full]

 

 

13 January 2009

Prof Christopher GreenwoodProfessor Greenwood receives knighthood

Professor Christopher Greenwood, professor of international law at LSE, recently appointed as a judge at the International Court of Justice, has been awarded a knighthood for services to public international law in the Queen's New Year Honours list 2009.

 

 

13 January 2009

Emily Jackson discusses euthanasia in the Independent's short film series

Prof Emily JacksonProfessor Emily Jackson discusses the meaning of death and the moral and legal questions raised by euthanasia in the first of The Independent's new series of short films.

Speaking of the many Britons who have helped relatives travel abroad in order to participate in legal euthanasia, she claims "people who help their relatives by taking them to Switzerland know that they could be committing an offence which would see them go to prison for 14 years."

"I'd like to see a very well thought out and very carefuly framed law which in some circumstances permitted doctors to assist their patients when they were suffering unbearably."

Big Ideas is a series of films featuring leading academics from the London School of Economics and Political Science presenting novel and often bold solutions to some of the problems facing British society today. The series has been made specially for Independent.co.uk by Ember Regis in conjunction with LSE.

[click here to view Emily Jackson's film]

 

19 December 2008

LSE Law Department triumphs in Research Assessment Exercise

"The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) is how the Government measures the quality of research in UK universities.  It uses these measures to distribute resources to support research.  The massive exercise involves the evaluation of the published research in each department in every university.  In the past, the RAE produced a broad evaluation for each department.  The LSE law department has always achieved the highest category of 5*.  This year, however, a new methodology of 'quality profiles' was used.  The results published this week can be used by the newspapers to create league tables based on either grade point average (GPA) or, like the Olympics, a medal table, in which 'world leading' 4* publications count as gold.  The new league table demonstrates what I have always claimed to be the case: the LSE is the top research university in law.  This result is true based either on the grade point average or the proportion of publications winning the accolade of 4*. Notice in particular in the table of the top 10 law schools how at LSE 45% of publications are judged to be world leading 4* quality, in contrast to our nearest rivals at only 35%.  All staff deserve to be congratulated on this stunning result."

Professor Hugh Collins, Head of Department

[click here for more information from the RAE]

[click here for an article in the Times]

9 December 2008
Cherie Blair tells her story at LSE

In a frank conversation with LSE Director Sir Howard Davies, Cherie Blair QC spoke about her autobiography, Speaking for Myself (Little, Brown, 2008), in front of a capacity audience in the Sheikh Zayed Theatre on 3rd December 2008.

In a light-hearted and humorous exchange Cherie talked about her experience of coming to study law at LSE in 1972, describing the luxury of running hot water and the novelty of the first lift in the Old Building. She spoke of her move into legal practice as a pupil under the future Lord Chancellor and noted how the social and political context in which law was taught at LSE had been instrumental in the way her career had progressed.

The conversation also touched on a range of subjects from her experience of sex discrimination, her relationship with former Prime Minister Tony Blair and going shopping with Hilary Clinton. Amongst the stories she told about life in 10 Downing Street was one where, after dinner with the Putins in Russia, she and Tony were invited to go to shoot wild boar; she reminisced on the complexities of hunting boar in high-heeled shoes and an evening gown.

Following questions from the audience, students queued in droves to have her sign her book and to have their photos taken with her. The evening closed with a drinks reception on the 8th floor of the New Academic Building, with its magnificent views over London, when the students' Law Society presented Cherie with flowers and champagne.

 

9 December 2008

Professor of International Law

The Department of Law, a world-leading centre for research and teaching in legal studies and interdisciplinary approaches to law, seeks to appoint a new Professor of International Law, to fill the vacancy left by Professor Christopher Greenwood's appointment to the International Court of Justice.

Applicants should have an outstanding international research reputation in public international law. The postholder will participate in teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level and, in particular, contribute to the development of innovative postgraduate courses. In addition to research leadership, the successful applicant will be expected to take on administrative responsibilities in the Department and the School. This appointment will be from 1 September 2009, or as soon as possible thereafter.

[click here for full details of this vacancy]

 

9 December 2008

Prof Klug on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Francesca Klug, Professorial Research Fellow, yesterday discussed the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on BBC Radio 4's Start the Week.

[click here for the Radio 4 website]

 

2 December 2008

Cassel Professor of Commercial Law

The Department of Law, a world-leading centre for research and teaching in legal studies and interdisciplinary approaches to law, seeks to appoint the new Cassel Professor of Commercial Law. Previous holders of this distinguished position include Professor Lord Wedderburn and Sir Ross Cranston FBA, and the present incumbent is Professor Paul Davies QC FBA.

Applicants should have an outstanding international research reputation in commercial law. The postholder will participate in teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level and, in particular, contribute to the development of innovative postgraduate courses. In addition to research leadership, the successful applicant will be expected to take on administrative responsibilities in the Department and the School.

This appointment will be from 1 September 2009, or as soon as possible thereafter.

[click here for full details of this vacancy]

 

2 December 2008

Dr Kleinheisterkamp receives funding for UNIDROIT PICC research

Dr Jan Kleinheisterkamp has received a £5000 support from the HEIF 4 Bid Fund for knowledge transfer in the social sciences. The support is destined to disseminating to practitioners the result of a large research project on the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts, which is lead by Dr Kleinheisterkamp together with Professor Stefan Vogenauer (Oxford), and which is culminating with the publication of the  Commentary on the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts (PICC) by Oxford University Press in January 2009. The UNIDROIT Principles are of particular interest for cross-border transactions in which the choice of some national law as governing the contract is difficult or even inappropriate due to the different legal backgrounds of the parties. The project provides both practitioners and academics from different legal backgrounds with comprehensive scholarly and practical commentary on the Principles' abstract black letter rules, and thus renders the Principles more accessible, more reliable, and thus more attractive for use in practice. The HEIF funding will help organising events in London and Paris that will allow the contributors of the project present their work to, and discuss it with, practitioners in the field of international contracts and arbitration. These events will be organised in February 2009 in co-operation the London Court of International Arbitration and the International Court of Arbitration of the International Chamber of Commerce in Paris.

[click here for details of Dr Kleinheisterkamp's forthcoming book]

 

European Civil Code - cover24 November 2008

Prof Hugh Collins launches new book The European Civil Code

In his latest book, Professor Collins argues that the European Union should develop a civil code to provide uniform rules for contracts, property rights and protection against civil wrongs, thus drawing together the differing national traditions with respect to the detailed regulation of civil society.

[click here for the publisher's site]


23 November 2008

New Academic Building - latest pictures

The LSE's New Academic Building was officially opened by Her Majesty the Queen on 5 November 2008. As part of the royal visit to open the new building Her Royal Highness and Prince Phillip expressed an interest in viewing the Law Department's new moot court room in action. The royal visitors viewed the LSE team for the Jessop International Moot Court Competition in a practice session. To greet the royal party to the law department were Professor Hugh Collins and Mr David Heleniak, an alumnus whose generous contribution made the moot court competition possible. David Heleniak entertained the Queen with stories of his student days at LSE, whilst Prince Philip was interested to find out from Professor Collins about the nature of the dispute in the competition. Pictures from the visit are now available below:-

 

     

 

 

23 November 2008

Prof Hugh Collins comments on BNP membership row

Professor Collins was asked to comment by the Daily Star on the prospect of BNP members being sacked from their employment, on grounds of membership of the far-right organisation (only serving police officers and prison warders are legally banned from joining the extremist party) confirming it would be illegal.

[click here for the Daily Star article]

 

19 November 2008

Dr Beyani on BBC World TV

Dr Chaloka Beyani was interviewed by the BBC world television this morning (17th November at 10.35am) on the situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Dr Beyani attended the Summit of the Heads of State that was held in Nairobi on 7th of November 2008 to address the crisis in the Congo. That meeting called for an immediate cease-fire, opening up a humanitarian corridor to address the humanitarian crisis, and facilitating dialogue between President Joseph Kabila and General Laurent Nkunda.

Dr Beyani also successfully negotiated the adoption of an African Union Convention on Internally Displaced Persons in Ethiopia, Addis Ababa on 10th November. The Convention lays out a framework for protecting and assisting internally displaced persons based on human rights, refugee law, international humanitarian law, and international criminal law, and is the first of its kind in the world.

[click here for Dr Beyani's staff profile]

 

 

Women, Crime and Character - cover

18 November 2008

Prof Nicola Lacey's launches Women, Crime and Character

The launch for Professor Nicola Lacey's new book Women, Crime, and Character: From Moll Flanders to Tess of the D'Urbervilles will take place on Wednesday 26th November at 5.30pm at the London School of Economics. Please contact Bradley Barlow for further details.

[click here for the publisher's site]

 

 

18 November 2008

Two LSE contenders for prestigious book prize

The Regulation of Cyberspace - coverTwo members of the Department have been short listed for the prestigious Inner Temple Book Prize. Dr Stephen Watterson has been short listed for his book Subrogation (OUP 2007) (co-authored with Chares Mitchell) and Andrew Murray has been short listed for his book The Regulation of Cyberspace: Control in the Subrogation - coverOnline Environment (Routledge 2006). The prize, which will be awarded for the first time in December 2008, is intended to encourage and reward the writing of books which make an outstanding scholarly contribution to the understanding of the law as administered in England and Wales.  The Prize will be adjudicated by a distinguished panel of judges chaired by Lord Woolf of Barnes, former Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales.

[click here to read about the Inner Temple Book Prize]

[click here for the short-list]

 

7 November 2008

Prof Christopher GreenwoodProf Greenwood elected to the International Court of Justice

Professor Christopher Greenwood is to be the new British judge at the International Court of Justice in The Hague. He was elected in the first round of voting at the United Nations in New York, securing 15 votes in the Security Council and 157 in the General Assembly.

[read the Daily Telegraph article in full]

[read a statement by the UK Foreign Secretary]

 

4 November 2008

Andrew Murray interviewed ahead of AOP Forum

The Association of Online Publishers is holding an Intellectual Property and Copyright Forum. 'Who owns the content? and does it matter?'  on 20th November. Andrew Murray will speak at the event and was recently interviewed online.

[click here to read Andrew Murray's interview]

 

29 October 2008

Law Department hosts high level stakeholders' forum on media publicity and the law of contempt

Together with the BBC College of Journalism and the Polis think tank, the Law Department has recently hosted a high level policy forum on media publicity and the law of contempt (24 October). The discussion was held under Chatham House rules, but it can be reported that there was consensus that continuation with the current regime was untenable in the medium term. It was recognised, however, that the evidence base which might justify legislative or other reforms was not yet fully developed.
    During discussions, there was agreement that – rightly or wrongly - the existing law has been less rigorously enforced in recent years. For some, this has resulted in unacceptable levels of prejudicial publicity circulating in the public sphere. Others were more sanguine as to the attendant risks. The current regime was thought to leave too great a measure of uncertainty over quite when media organisations might breach the law, with the result that while some felt over-prone to self-censorship others were perhaps to willing to 'push boundaries'. The emergence of the Internet was recognised as a complicating factor in respect of any attempt to isolate prospective or actual jury members from potentially prejudicial knowledge.

The participants at the forum were: Lord Justice Leveson (Senior Presiding Judge for England and Wales); Mr Justice Eady (High Court Judge); Judge Peter Thornton (Senior Circuit Judge); Joshua Rozenberg (Chair – freelance journalist); Jonathan Jones (Director General, Attorney General's Office); Jonathan Kotler (US Attorney / USC Annenburg School of Journalism); Ceri Thomas (Editor, The Today Programme, BBC); Rene Barclay (Director of Serious Casework, Crown Prosecution Service); John Battle (Head of Legal Compliance, ITN); Charlie Beckett (Director, Polis, LSE); Richard Bishop (Royal Courts of Justice); Ian Cram (Professor of Comparative Constitutional Law, University of Leeds); Richard Danbury (Senior Broadcast Journalist, Newsnight, BBC); Michelle Dyson (Head of Legal Policy Team, Ministry of Justice); Alex Gerlis (Head of Training, BBC College of Journalism); Chris Greenaway (Polis); Mark Haslam (Partner, BCL Burton Copeland); David Hayward (BBC College of Journalism); David Levy (Director, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford); Valerie Nazareth (Head of Programme Legal Advice, BBC); Matthew Ryder (Matrix Chambers); Bob Satchwell (Executive Director, Society of Editors); Andrew Scott (Senior Lecturer in Law, LSE); Mark Simmons (Commander, Metropolitan Police); Stephen Smith (Royal Courts of Justice); Neil Wallis (Managing Editor, News of the World); Richard Watson (Correspondent, Newsnight, BBC)

For further information, please contact Dr Andrew Scott (a.d.scott@lse.ac.uk).

 

28 October 2008

Dr Florian Hoffmann wins prestigious international research award

To commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Swiss government, in conjunction with the Norwegian government and the Geneva Academy for International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights, has launched an initiative to take the Declaration's promise further. On December 5, a Panel of Eminent Persons chaired by Mary Robinson and Paulo Sergio Pinheiro will launch an Agenda for Human Rights and announce a number of research projects, chosen by the Panel and each awarded CHF 23.000, related to the issues included in the Agenda. One of these is a project on the Potential of Human Dignity as a Framework for Emerging Human Rights Issues, conceived and coordinated by Dr Frédéric Mégret, of McGill University's Center for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism, and Dr Florian Hoffmann of the Law Department. Besides McGill and LSE, the project brings together human rights scholars from, amongst others, Ghana, India, Israel, and South Africa, who will be exploring the human dignity framework in relation to six groups - migrants, the elderly, sexual minorities, women in religious contexts, the working poor, and 'terrorists'. It will result in a joint research paper due in May 2009.

[For more information on the initiative, please consult:
http://www.adh-geneva.ch/events/special-projects.php]

28 October 2008

Lord Wedderburn comments on financial regulation

The LSE's distinguished Emeritus Professor of Law, Lord Wedderburn, wrote to the Times yesterday on opportunities for innovation in financial regulation during the current banking crisis.

[read the Times letter in full]

21 October 2008

Symposium on International Law and History held at LSE

On Friday 10th October a one-day Symposium on "The Work of History in International Law and Empire" was held at LSE, bringing together international lawyers, legal theorists and international relations scholars from diverse backgrounds to discuss the current pre-occupation with history in international legal scholarship. The four panels covered the work of history in internationalist scholarship, the significance of secrecy and secret histories, the liberating and constraining effects of appeals to history, as well as the truth and ends of history. Throughout the discussions, the function of history as critique or escape, and the responsibility and commitment of scholars were recurrent themes. The Symposium was organised on the initiative of Gerry Simpson of LSE and Anne Orford of Melbourne University, and featured, among many others, Martti Koskenniemi of Cambridge University, Matthew Craven of SOAS and David Chandler of Westminster University as participants. The symposium was held under the auspices of the IHL Project.

[click here for the Symposium programme]

 

Prof Emily Jackson

3 October 2008

New LSE Lecture Series

On Wednesday 8th October, Professor Emily Jackson will inaugurate LSE's new lunchtime lecture series Thinking Like a Social Scientist, with a lecture on issues which currently concern academic lawyers in the area of medical law, spanning the beginning and end of life and the regulation, or otherwise, of the pharmaceutical industry.

[click here for full details]

Prof Christine Chinkin2 October 2008

UN Report on Gaza published

Archbishop Desmond Tutu has delivered a scathing report to the UN Human Rights Commission on Israel's shelling of Beit Hanoun in Gaza in 2006. The report says the shelling may have been a war crime. It criticises an Israeli inquiry that concluded that the shelling was due to a flawed artillery system. The Archbishop also criticised the international community for "failing to fulfil its role in respect of the suffering of the people of Gaza". Professor Christine Chinkin was a member of the UN team.

[click here to read the UN Report,
Human Rights Situation in Palestine and Other Occupied Arab Territories
]

19 September 2008

Prof Lacey comments on Tess of the D'Urbervilles

Professor Nicola Lacey, author of Women, Crime and Character: From Moll Flanders to Tess of the d'Urbervilles (Clarendon/OUP 2008) comments in the Guardian on the latest TV adaptation of Hardy's book.

[click here to read the Guardian article in full]

16 September 2008

Treasury draft proposals follow Prof Davies' review  

UK companies could face legal action if they issue profit warnings or other statements which are false and misleading, under new plans being brought in by the government. HM Treasury's latest draft proposals largely follow the suggestions of Professor Paul Davies QC, published in his 2007 review Issuer liability for misstatements to the market ...

[click here to read article in Accountancy Age]


9 September 2008

Prof Gearty publishes new collection

Professor Conor GeartyConor Gearty has been writing on human rights, civil liberties and terrorism for over twenty-five years. In his new book, Essays on Human Rights and Terrorism: Comparative Approaches to Civil Liberties in Asia, the EU and North America (Cameron May, 2008) his writings on the global, regional and comparative dimensions to his subject are brought together for the first time. The book contains articles from law journals and literary periodicals as well as written versions of a number of distinguished lectures on these topics that have been given by the author. There are also three especially commissioned pieces on the particular application of human rights law and practice in Asia, dealing with the universality of human rights, the impact of 'Asian values' on human rights, and the challenge posed by China for contemporary human rights thinking. With chapters on the United States and the European region, and also on such terrorism/human rights related problems as Northern Ireland, the book offers a broad overview of a series of legal issues pressing in on the world today.

[click here for publisher's site]

26 2008 2008

Welcoming our new staff ...

This has been a busy season for the Department in selecting new staff to join us. We have been very fortunate to attract a veritable cosmopolitan group of brilliant young lawyers. The international reputation of LSE and the high national ranking of the Law Department enables us to persuade promising scholars from all over the world to join us. They include Professor Eduardo Baistrocci, Mr Jacco Bomhoff, Dr Jo Braithwaite, Dr Florian Hoffmann, Dr Jan Kleinheisterkamp, Professor Niamh Moloney, Ms Anthea Roberts, Dr Fauzia Shariff and Dr Stephen Watterson ...

[click here to learn more about our new appointments]


Philip Glenister as Gene Hunt in the drama Life on Mars12 August 2008

Prof Reiner considers Life on Mars
Professor of Crimonology, Robert Reiner, was quoted by the Manchester Evening News this week, on the question of whether the BBC's drama Life on Mars is an accurate portrayal of policing in the 1970s.

[read the full Manchester Evening News Article here]

 

05 August 2008

New articles in Law Society and Economy Working Paper Series

We are pleased to announce the publication of the third issue of the LSE Law Society and Economy Working Paper Series 2008. In this issue, Tom Poole (WP9/2008) reflects on the impact of the new rights jurisprudence on administrative law, comparing approaches adopted by the English and Australian courts in the last ten years; Giorgio Monti (WP10/2008) argues that recent reforms to the EC Merger Control Regulation were unnecessary, and that lawyers and economists supported the reforms for different reasons; however early decisions under the new Regulation suggest it is too loose and the Commission is using the Regulation to regulate the market, not simply remove an impediment to competition; Andrew Lang (WP11/2008) explores two difficulties with Art 5.7 of the Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures: the position where a member takes provisional measures but refuses to conduct further research; and the extent to which the agreement can be used as a safe harbour with respect to products which incorporate newly emerging technology, even where a risk assessment has been carried out. Finally, Aseel al Ramahi (WP12/2008) considers the differences between the Arab and Islamic approach to dispute resolution and that of the West, arguing that the former emphasises the collective group but the latter the individual and the importance of procedures. This results in a friction when the two are on opposite sides of a dispute, but it is one which commercial arbitration can accommodate if used effectively.

 

30 July 2008

Senior Lecturer Andrew Scott has been widely quoted in the media this week, following the outcome of the Max Mosley privacy case in the High Court. He concludes the ruling that a newspaper breached Max Mosley's privacy will strike at the core of the business model favoured by many red-top tabloids, putting paid to most 'kiss and tell' stories in mainstream publications.

[click here for Andrew's article in the Daily Telegraph]
[click here for Andrew's article in the Independent on Sunday]

Dr Chaloka Beyani was in the delegation of the Foreign Secretary, David Milliband, at the bilateral leadership forum between the United Kingdom and South Africa in Pretoria, 6-8 July. The South African delegation to the Forum was headed by the Foreign Minister of South Africa, Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma. Dr Beyani co-presented to the Forum the recommendations made by civil society on human rights.
    Dr Chaloka Beyani has also been nominated to the Panel of Eminent Personalities to advise the African Union Heads of States on the raodmap for establishing an African Union Government.

[click here for David Miliband's lecture at the University of South Africa]
[click here for a communique released by the ministers]

 

Niamh Moloney15 July 2008
Prof Niamh Moloney to join LSE
The Law Department is delighted to announce that Professor Niamh Moloney hainancial M Professor Moloney studied law at Trinity College Dublin and Harvard Law School. She has taught at University of Nottingham, Queen's University Belfast, and University College London. At present she is Professor of Capital Markets Law at the University of Nottingham. Her main body of published research is in the field of the regulation of capital markets and investment services. In particular, she published the first book on EU capital market and investments services law, entitled EC Securities Regulation (2002). She is a member of a number of editorial boards including the European Business Organisation Law Review and the Capital Markets Law Journal. Professor Moloney will join the department in January 2009. She will be contributing to the teaching of company law and financial regulation at undergraduate and post-graduate levels.

8 July 2008
Law Summer School Programme
The 7th of July marks the opening of the 2008 Summer School Programme in Law. Over the next six weeks nearly five hundred students from around the globe will follow intense programmes in six courses organised by the Law Department for the LSE Summer School. This year's law programme is the biggest yet and will see students studying such diverse subjects as Introduction to English Law, Introduction to Corporate Law and Human Rights, Law Theory and Practice. The Law Department welcomes all Summer School Students and thanks staff for their valuable support of this programme.

[view the programme for the Law Summer School]

8 July 2008
Prof Gearty in health 'lottery' case
Prof Conor Gearty, also a barrister at Matrix chambers, will represent a grandmother bringing a High Court challenge against the NHS 'postcode lottery' that makes the same anti-cancer drug unavailable in Manchester, but widely available in nearby Cheshire.

[click here to read the Manchester Evening News article]

2 July 2008
Annual PhD Dinner
The annual dinner for PhD students and their supervisors recently took place at the Cafe du Jardin. Thanks to Rachel Yarham, Andrew Murray and Nico Krisch, who organised this very enjoyable event to mark the end of a year of hard work and exceptional success in completion of doctorates.

 

2 July 2008
Prof Duxbury on Precedent
Nature and Authority of Precedent - coverIn his new book, The Nature and Authority of Precedent, Prof Neil Duxbury examines how precedents constrain legal decision-makers and how legal decision-makers relax and avoid those constraints. He argues that there is no single principle or theory which explains the authority of precedent but rather a number of arguments which raise rebuttable presumptions in favour of precedent-following.

[see Prof Duxbury's bio for more details of his publications]

 

1 July 2008
Prof Zander on American-style sentencing
Michael Zander, QC, Emeritus Professor of Law at LSE, has declared proposals for an American-style sentencing "grid" to be 'dead in the water' after unanimous opposition from all ranks of the judiciary.

[click here to read the Times article]

1 July 2008
Dr Beyani on BBC World Service
Dr Chaloka Beyani recently appeared on the BBC World Service's Focus on Africa programme, giving a detailed interview on the use of the "Truth and Reconciliation" commission, as an alternative to punitive justice, in African states.

[click here to listen to Dr Beyani's interview]

19 June 2008
Prof Gearty on 42 Day Detention
Prof Conor Gearty, writing in the Camden New Journal, says that those who introduce internment never call it by its true name, but the bill passed by the Commons last week amounts to nothing less.

[read Prof Gearty's letter in full]

18 June 2008

Prof Redmayne wins teaching prize

Mike RedmayneProf Mike Redmayne has been awarded the teaching prize in the Department of Law for 2008. The prize was awarded in recognition of Mike Redmayne's consistently high scores in student surveys of teaching, his considerable contribution to teaching in the department at both undergraduate and post-graduate levels, and his exemplary performance in his role as Chair of the LLB examiners in assuring the integrity and fairness in the assessment process. Congratulations Mike!

[read Prof Redmayne's staff profile]

Casting the Net WiderDr Margot Salomon's new book Casting the Net Wider: Human Rights, Development and New Duty-Bearers was launched with a panel discussion at the European Parliament last week. The book, edited by Dr Salomon (LSE), Dr Arne Tostensen (Chr. Michelsen Institute) and Prof Wouter Vandenhole (Antwerp), was discussed by Dr Salomon and Prof Vandenhole, in conversation with Riina Kionka (Personal Representative of the SG/HR on Human Rights) and Prof Olivier De Schutter (UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food).

[click here for the publisher's flyer of 'Casting the Net Wider']

 

Jonathan Fisher, QC17 June 2008
Jonathan Fisher, QC, on BBC Radio 4
Visiting Professor Jonathan Fisher, QC, recently spoke on the BBC's File on Four, in his capacity as an expert on fraud and money laundering, commenting on the programme's findings that thousands of money launderers and 13 alleged terrorists were involved in running UKcompanies.

[read more about this episode of File on Four]
[click here to view Prof Fisher's website]

 

17 June 2008
Law Department reviewed in India Law Journal
The Law Department features in this month's India Law Journal, receiving particularly high praise from its LLM students.

[read the article in India Law Journal]

Chaloka Beyani17 June 2008
Dr Beyani instrumental in IDP convention ...
Congratulations to Dr Chaloka Beyani who has played a pivotal role in facilitating the adoption of the African Union Convention on Internally Displaced Persons, which was successfully concluded earlier this week. The AU Convention on IDPs is expected to be adopted by the Executive Council of Foreign Ministers at the end of July 2008. Dr Beyani has also been acting as the Legal Adviser to the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region, where The Pact on Security, Stability and Development in the Great Lakes Region has just entered into force in (May 2008), with funding formally approved by the African Development Bank.

[read more about Dr Beyani]

11 June 2008
Prof Gearty on Human Rights and Terrorism
Professor Conor Gearty has just published his report Human rights, civil society and the challenge of terrorism. The report is timely, published just as the government argues for 42-day detention for terrorist suspects. Prof Gearty assesses structures for legislating against and combating terrorism, and argues that the government's current stance is in stark contrast to Labour's civil libertarian approach whilst in opposition, and smacks of hypocrisy.

[click here for Prof Gearty's report and further information]

10 June 2008
Prof Salecl on BBC World Service
Centennial Professor Renata Salecl recently appeared on the BBC World Service's The Forum programme, discussing her latest work 'The Tyranny of Choice', analysing why capitalist insistence on choice increases feelings of anxiety and guilt.

[listen to The Forum online]

10 June 2008
Lord Wedderburn on 42-day detention
The LSE's distinguished Emeritus Professor of Law, Lord Wedderburn, recently entered the debate on the time limit for the detention of terrorists without trial, writing to the Times.

[read the Times letter column]

03 June 2008
Prof Chinkin returns from Gaza UN mission
Professor Christine Chinkin has just returned from a three-day mission to Gaza, as part of team with Desmond Tutu, the South African Nobel laureate. Organised by the UN Human Rights Council, the team investigated the deaths of Palestinean civilians killed by Israeli artillery fire at Beit Hanoun in November 2006. Professor Chinkin's initial conclusion was that a breach of international law took place, commenting 'Firing in a way that cannot distinguish between civilians and combatants is clearly a violation of international humanitarian law ... I don't think that the idea of a technical mistake takes away from the initial responsibility of the action of firing where civilian casualties are clearly foreseeable.'

[read more in the Guardian]
[listen to Prof Chinkin interviewed on the BBC's Today programme
Friday 30th May, 6.50am]

03 June 2008
Meetings on the Regulation of C21st Journalism
The Law Department, together with Polis and the Media and Communications Department, have recently hosted the first of two Round Table meetings on the Regulation of C21st Journalism. Participants at the first meeting included inhouse legal advisors from many leading UK media organisations, and leading media lawyers from private practice. The aims of the two meetings are to open an interface between LSE and media practitioners, and to promote media law and policy research that is relevant to practice.

    Participants at the first Round Table were drawn from the BBC, ITN, Associated Newspapers, Times Newspapers, News International, Trinity Mirror, Newspaper Society, Press Association, David Price Solicitors and Advocates, Finer Stephens Innocent, Lewis Silkin, 5 Raymond Buildings, and Doughty Street Chambers.

    The second Round Table meeting is scheduled to take place in mid-July. Participants at that event will be include leading media lawyers from private practice and the Bar, and representatives of regulators and government .

[For further information, contact Dr Andrew Scott (a.d.scott@lse.ac.uk).]

27 May 2008

Terror and Consent - Prof Philip Bobbitt at LSE

The threat of terrorism is now part of the landscape of daily lives all over the world, yet we have hardly begun to think properly about it. In his new book Terror and Consent, Professor Bobbitt argues that we are fighting these wars with weapons and concepts which though useful to us in previous conflicts have now been superseded. He aims to provide a fundamental rethinking of most generally accepted ideas about terror in the modern world – what it is, how it operates and above all how it can be frustrated. Prof Bobbitt will give a public lecture at the LSE on 3 June.

[click here for details of Prof Bobbitt's lecture]

27 May 2008

Hamlyn Seminar at IALS

Following her series of Hamlyn Lectures in 2007, entitled The Prisoners' Dilemma: Political Economy and Penal Populism in Contemporary Democracies, Professor Nicola Lacey will take part in the 2008 Hamlyn Seminar at the Institute for Advanced Legal Studies on 2 June, as well as launching her new book based on the lecture series.

[click here for details of Prof Lacey's book]
[click here for details of the IALS event]

Professor Emily Jackson recently spoke to the Guardian concerning the forthcoming parliamentary debate on the time limit for abortions. She is quoted by the newspaper as saying that women denied abortions in their own country would simply go overseas to get them. 'That would only be an option for the well-off, of course. For women who couldn't afford that, those who are on drugs, for example, that would not be possible. Then we would have to face the prospect that these women would try to do something themselves to halt their pregnancies.'

[click here for the full Guardian article]

Lord Woolf, former Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, will give a public lecture on 19th May, in which he offer his personal insights into the main law reforms over the past four decades.

[click here for full details of Lord Woolf's lecture]

The Department seeks to appoint a professor of Financial Markets Law, to develop and lead innovative research and teaching programmes. This appointment will be from 1 January 2009, or as soon as possible thereafter. Applicants should have an outstanding international research reputation in Financial Markets Law.
    The postholder will participate in teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level and, in particular, contribute to the development of innovative postgraduate courses. In addition to demonstrating research leadership, the successful applicant will be expected to take on administrative responsibilities in the Department and the School.

[click here for full details of the post]

The London School of Economics Law Department has just been ranked amongst the top three UK universities for its undegraduate law programme by the Guardian University Guide, 2009. In another survey, The Good University Guide (produced in assocation with The Independent) also rated the Department very highly, giving it second place nationally.

[click here to read Guardian Guide 2009] | [click here for the Good University Guide]

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, gave a lecture at the LSE on 1 May 2008, as part of the Forum on Religion's events programme, entitled "Religion and Human Rights", chair by Professor Conor Gearty.

[click here to download a transcript]
[click here to listen to the mp3 podcast]

Sir John Holmes, recently appointed to lead a UN taskforce addressing the issue of food insecurity, spoke at the LSE on Monday 28th April, in a lecture entitled Meeting the new humanitarian challenges of the 21st century. The lecture was organised by the International Humanitarian Law Project and Crisis States Research Centre.

[click here to read a related article in the Guardian]

On 10th April, two High Court judges condemned the UK Government's "abject surrender" to Saudi Arabian pressure over a corruption and bribery investigation into a £40 billion arms contract. Visiting Professor Jonathan Fisher, QC, spoke to BBC News 24 on the decision.

[click here to view the BBC interview]
[click here to view Prof Fisher's website]

Speaking at the LSE Asia Forum in Singapore, Professor Conor Gearty took issue with the country's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, and supported the protests that have taken place during the progress of the Olympic torch.

[click here to read the Straits Times article]

Many congratulations to Kurtis Wolfe (LLM, 2006/07) who has just been awarded the Brian Keeling Memorial Prize, by a jury headed by distinguished QC Hilary Heilbron, for his dissertation After the Fall: Surviving the "Vanishing Trial's" Threat to the Landscape of Dispute Resolution.

Fraudsters will be encouraged to enter early guilty pleas in exchange for lower jail sentences, under reforms proposed on Thursday to cut costs and sharpen efforts to tackle financial crime. Visiting Professor Jonathan Fisher, QC, comments in the Financial Times.

[click here to read the FT article]

As the coroner began his summing up of the testimony in the Princess Diana inquiry, Michael Zander, Emeritus Professor of Law at LSE, was amongst eminent lawyers quoted by New York's Daily News, concerning the possible verdicts that might be reached by the jury

[click here to read the Daily News article]

Revelations concerning payment by HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) of £100,000 to Heinrich Kieber, a former Liechtenstein banker, for details of secret offshore bank accounts held by British taxpayers raises a serious moral dilemma about how tax evasion is combated in modern times. Visiting Professor Jonathan Fisher, QC, discusses the use of informants to catch tax evaders in the Daily Telegraph.

[click here to read the Daily Telegraph article]

The Department of Law is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in legal studies and interdisciplinary approaches to law. In summer 2008, we will move to new premises on Lincoln's Inn Fields and, as we enter this exciting phase of our development, we are keen to make new appointments to develop further our research portfolio and support our undergraduate and postgraduate programmes.
    We invite applications from strong candidates, with both a record in research (evidencing strong research potential) and teaching experience in any area of English Private Law or International Commercial Finance. We encourage the development of teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels and all members of the Department's academic staff are expected to contribute to core undergraduate teaching.

[click here to read "Jobs at LSE" for further information]

Congratulations are due to the LSE teams participating in the International Criminal Court Student Network Moot (15-16 March 2008). The LLM team of James Ghaeni, Sophie McWilliams and Alex Prezanti took first place, carrying off "Best Memorial for the Defence", with James Ghaeni winning "Best Oralist". The LLB team of Stef Papantoniou, Kelesi Blundell, Olamide Olajide and Jennifer Poh also took home "Best Memorial for the Defence" in their competition. Well done to both teams!

[read more about the ICC Moot]

Professor Klug's letter responded to Henry Porter's comments in the previous week's Observer on the subject of a "Bill of Rights".

[click here to read Professor Klug's letter in full]

The LSE Law Department and the Law Commission we are pleased to announce a seminar chaired by Kenneth Parker, Law Commissioner for Public Law, 12 March 2008. The guest speaker is Justice David Ipp of the New South Wales Court of Appeal. David Ipp chaired the Australian committee on "The Review of the Law of Negligence". The seminar is part of the Law Commission's on-going programme considering the reform of remedies in public law.

Please contact Keith Vincent for further information.

Centennial Professor of Law Renata Salecl appeared with Professor Henrietta Moore and Professor Susie Orbach at a discussion on 4th March, addressing contemporary sexualities and their uneasy relationship to love, fantasy and intimacy.

[click here to listen to the discussion]

26 February 2008

The Departments of Law and Media and Communication at the London School of Economics are pleased to host Professor Jonathan Zittrain who will give two seminars, on 4 & 5 March, entitled "The Future of the Internet: And How to Stop It". Jonathan Zittrain holds the Chair in Internet Governance and Regulation at the University of Oxford and is a Principal of the Oxford Internet Institute. He is also the Jack N. and Lillian R. Berkman Visiting Professor for Entrepreneurial Legal Studies at Harvard Law School, where he co-founded Harvard Law School's Berkman Center for Internet & Society in 1996.

[click here to read more about Prof Zittrain's forthcoming seminars]

Jack Straw's recent speech in Washington on "Modernising the Magna Carta" quoted Professor Francesca Klug.
[read the Ministry of Justice press release here]

Four Bradford University students, freed on appeal after being jailed for becoming "intoxicated" by extremist propaganda, could be allowed to return to study at the university. Asked for comment by the Bradford Telegraph & Argus, Prof Gearty stated "Anxieties about terrorism must never be allowed to reach such a point that we feel incapable as a society of engaging in free and frank discussion even with those with whom we profoundly disagree or even with those whose views we loathe ..."

[read the Bradford Telegraph & Argus article here]

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, has agreed to speak at the LSE on 1 May 2008, as part of the Forum on Religion's events programme. The Forum  provides the LSE and the broader community with a space for the learning, exchange and discussion on matters related to faith and religion in contemporary society. Responding to the increasing salience of religion in a number of disciplines, the Forum seeks to cultivate a coordinated and interdisciplinary exploration at the School of a range of themes related to religion and society. It aims to be a leader and a facilitator for research and scholarly debate in these areas. The Archbishop's lecture will be entitled "Religion and Human Rights".

[click here for the Forum on Religion home page]

‘Antonin Scalia works hard to protect himself from having to think seriously about torture,’ he said. ‘His devices are quite obvious, the idea of a smack on the face - rather than sensory deprivation, or waterboarding or any of the Abu Ghraib images ..."

[click here to read the BBC article]

Justice Antonin Scalia of the Supreme Court of the United States gave a lecture entitled ‘Mullahs of the West’ to an appreciative student audience on 6th February. In his lecture he criticized the current trend to expect judges in constitutional and human rights courts to decide difficult questions of moral values and balances to be drawn between competing principles. He argued instead that bills of rights should establish minimum standards, and that political and moral issues should be decided democratically within those constitutional constraints. In the lively question and discussion session that followed, Justice Scalia was challenged on some of his more controversial views, such as his ‘originalist’ interpretation of the constitution.

Congratulations to Visiting Professor William Blair, QC, who has been appointed to the High Court.

[click here to read the Times article]

Visiting Professor Jonathan Fisher, QC, discusses the Money Laundering Regulations 2007 in an article in the Times, arguing that If the government wants to impose significant regulatory burdens, the Serious Organised Crime Agency must be adequately resourced, so it can properly support the business community.

[click here to read the Times article]

The LSE Forum in Legal and Political Theory has been awarded £2,200 by the LSE Annual Fund to support its activities. The Forum was established in Michaelmas 2007 by Thomas Poole (Law) and Philip Cook (Government) to increase collaboration between academics and research students from different departments at LSE who share an interest in legal and political theory. Professor Chandran Kukathas was the inaugural speaker, followed by a full programme of visiting and LSE based academics. The Annual Fund grant will also support an international symposium on the constitutional theory of Alan Brudner (University of Toronto) to be held in May. For further information on the Forum’s events please contact Thomas Poole orPhilip Cook.

Professor Gearty reviews Frank Furedi new book in the Times Higher Education Supplement.

[click here to read the review]

Visiting Professor Elspeth Guild who is to be awarded the honorary degree of juris doctor honoris causa by Lund University. The Lund Faculty of Law issued the following statement:

"In the course of a rich career combining research and practice, Elspeth Guild has successfully repositioned migration law at the intersection of discourses within and beyond the legal discipline She has offered her scholarly expertise to political institutions as well as civil society across Europe, and thereby stimulated democratic processes around the formulation of the law. Engaging with the law in its formal rigour as well as its ideational implications has been a hallmark of Elspeth Guild's scholarship, which combines empirical and theoretical strands in an exemplary and inspiring fashion. Over the years, Elspeth Guild has closely tracked legislative and jurisprudential shifts in European migration law as well as adjacent areas as criminal law, labour law and administrative law. She has exploited this repository of knowledge to develop a critique of European migration law in the best sense of the word, emphasising the capability of legal practice to articulate resistance against autocratic excesses within liberal democracies. Elspeth Guild has taken a particular interest in laws to counter terrorism and their impact on the individual rights and obligations of migrants and refugees. In the exercise of her scholarly profession, Elspeth Guild remains a European intellectual par excellence: accessible, curious and rigorous in her thinking."

Congratulations to Prof Guild!

54 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London - artist's impressionThe Department of Law will be relocating to a new academic building,54 Lincoln's Inn Fields,  in Autumn 2008. Whilst retaining the early 20th century facade overlooking Lincoln's Inn Fields, the interior has been completed rebuilt to provide a 21st century learning environment  ...

[click here to read more ...]

"Only by understanding the institutional preconditions for a tolerant criminal justice system can we think clearly about the possible options for reform within the British system."

Professor Nicola Lacey's Hamlyn Lecture is now available as a podcast ...

click here for the mp3 file (16MB; approx 68 minutes)

 

19/12/07
Financial Law by Joanna Benjamin
Joanna Benjamin's new book Financial Law, published by Oxford University Press,  offers a cross-sectoral, functional approach that looks at the financial market sectors of insurance, commercial banking, derivatives, capital markets and asset management ... [read more]

 

18/12/07
Law and Faith Lecture series announced for 2008
In a largely secular Britain faith is again a hot topic. Its political dimensions have attracted considerable attention but there has been relatively little about its legal implications. This series of three lectures will start the debate. The first event on 14 February 2008 will God in Public: reflections on faith and society; the second on 21 February 2008 Life and Death: a panel discussion and finally, on 26 February, Is Islamic Law Ethical? These events is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

 

04/12/07
Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series - Latest Issue
In this issue, Baldwin and Black (WP15/2007) argue for a ‘really responsive’ approach to enforcement, building on and extending Ayres and Braithwaite’s influential model of ‘responsive regulation’; Kershaw (WP16/2007) argues that the doctrine of capital maintenance has obscured the ways in which accounting based distribution regulation provides valuable protections to existing and potential involuntary creditors; Duxbury (WP17/2007) asks why Kelsen abandoned his original conception of the Basic Norm towards the end of his life; McCrea (WP18/2007) examines the EU’s differential response to the appropriate role of Christian and Islamic religions in public and private life by exploring its approach to accession member states and the integration of immigrants; and El-Enany (WP19/2007) highlights the unforeseen and unintended consequences of the EU’s refugee law on the world’s most vulnerable refugees.
[click here for the Working Paper Series]

 

04/12/07
Professor Nicola Lacey to deliver Hamlyn lecture at LSE
The third of Professors Lacey's Hamlyn lectures will be given this evening. In this lecture, Professor Lacey will set the nature and genesis of criminal justice policy in Britain and America within a comparative perspective, in order to make the case for thinking that, far from being invariable or inevitable, the rise of penal populism does not characterise all ‘late modern’ democracies. Only by understanding the institutional preconditions for a tolerant criminal justice system can we think clearly about the possible options for reform within the British system.
[click here for further information ...]
[read Professor Lacey writing in the Guardian ...]

 

04/12/07
LSE PhD Scholarships announced
For 2008 entry, the School is offering 20 full scholarships for new PhD students.  The scholarships cover fees and living expenses of £13,000 each year for three years.  They are available for Home UK/EU and Overseas students undertaking research in any LSE discipline, with annual renewal subject to satisfactory academic performance at the School.  Scholarships will be awarded on academic merit and research potential.
[click here to read more ...]

 

28/11/07
Cranston in ermine
Earlier this week, Professor Ross Cranston was formally inaugurated by the Lord Chief Justice as a judge of the High Court. Head of Department Hugh Collins attended the ceremony and commented 'Ross said he felt rather hot in his ermine robes, and denied any resemblance to Santa. Out of picture, sadly, are his tights and shoes covered in bling!'

 

 

MSc Prize awarded21/11/07
Herbert Smith Prize awarded

The winner of this year’s Herbert Smith Prize was Cindy Wong (pictured). The Prize is given for the best performance in the Law and Accounting Masters programme, and is sponsored by the international legal practice Herbert Smith LLP for the third year running.
    The Prize was awarded at a reception for Law and Accounting Masters alumni and current students on Tuesday 23 October in the Senior Dining Room.
    Senior members of the Herbert Smith firm, Mark Gedhay and Kathryn Cearns together with some of their trainees, attended the reception and students had an opportunity to discuss career opportunities in a large law firm.
   Cindy Wong has now returned to her management post in the Corporate Tax Division of the Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore. For more information on the MSc Law and Accounting click here

 
21/11/07
JOB VACANCIES: Lectureships in Law advertised ...

 

20/11/07
AIM Report published
The Alternative Investment Market (AIM) has established itself as the world’s leading stock market for young growing companies, according to new research published today by the LSE.  The study, From Local to Global – The rise of AIM as a stock market for growing companies, was commissioned by the London Stock Exchange and conducted by Geoffrey Owen, senior fellow in the Department of Management, Professor Julia Black, professor of Law, Law Department, and Sridhar Arcot, a researcher in the Financial Markets Group, LSE.
[read more about the AIM report]

 

05/11/07
Mediator Training Course announced
The Law Department is pleased to announce a unique course in negotiation and commercial mediation. This five-day programme is designed to provide intensive tuition, with successful participants gaining accreditation as mediators and a certificate in ADr
[click here to learn more about the Mediator Training Course]

 

23/10/07
Emily Jackson talks to the Italian Parliament
Professor Emily Jackson spoke last week to members of the Italian Parliament about the HFEA’s consultation on the creation of animal/human hybrid embryos for research purposes, and was interviewed on the subject by Liberazione.
[click here to read the interview (in Italian)]
 

23/10/07
Wedderburn amongst the greats
Emeritus Professor Lord Wedderburn, Cassel Professor of Commercial Law at the LSE (1964-92), was named by the Times last week as amongst the ten greatest teachers of Law.
[click here to read the Times article]

 

Mr Geoffrey Lewis, Professor Nicola Lacey, Professor Lisa Jardine and Professor Neil Duxbury

17/10/07
Legal Biography Project
Mr Geoffrey Lewis, Professor Nicola Lacey, Professor Lisa Jardine and Professor Neil Duxbury photographed after their panel discussion on judicial biography, the second event in the Legal Biography Project series.

 

 

17/10/07
'International Sale of Goods' in 2nd edition
Professor Michael Bridge's work The International Sale of Goods : Law and Practice is now published in its second edition by Oxford University Press. The new edition includes extended treatment of documentary letters of credit and an expanded coverage of the UN Convention on the International Sale of Goods; also, a new general discussion of the Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999, as well as new material on the conflict of laws and the construction of commercial contracts. Prof Bridge has also recently been elected to the Advisory Council of the Convention on the International Sale of Goods  
[click here for publisher's site]

 

16/10/07
'Litigating Human Rights in the Context of International Terrorism'
Helen Duffy's lecture of 11th October, exploring the human rights challenges posed by the 'War on Terror', is now available as a MP3 podcast.
[CLICK HERE to listen to this lecture.]

 

09/10/07
Ross Cranston QC becomes High Court Judge
Professor Ross Cranston, former member of the House of Commons (1997-2005) and Solicitor-General (1998-2001) has been appointed to the High Court. Professor Hugh Collins, Head of Department, offered his congratulations, remarking "a boon for civil justice in England, but we will miss his invaluable contribution to every aspect of departmental life."

 

09/10/07
Dilemmas of Terror
Professor Conor Gearty analyses counter-terrorism in an article for Prospect magazine
[click here to read the article]

 

03/10/07
Chaloki Beyani to advise on 'United States of Africa'
Dr Chaloka Beyani, Senior Lecturer in Law, has been appointed by the Chairperson of the African Union, President Kufuor of Ghana, to serve as an adviser to the African Union’s High Level Panel that will advise the African Heads of States on Political and Economic Integration in Africa and the possibility of establishing a ‘United States of Africa’.  Dr Beyani will also be attending the Commonwealth Law Ministers meeting at the Commonwealth Secretariat on 4th October 2007, where he will give a paper on ‘Small Commonwealth Jurisdictions and Compliance with International Obligations’.

 

02/10/07
IHL Conference: International Law in Situations of Post-Conflict
The International and Humanitarian Law Project held a successful one day Conference last week on 27th September on International Law in Situations of Post-Conflict: The Great Lakes Peace Process. The Conference was opened by Professor Christopher Greenwood and closed by Professor Christine Chinkin. 
[click here for further details of the conference]

 

02/10/07
'An Honest Citizen's Guide to Crime and Control'
Law and order has become a key issue throughout the world. Crime stories saturate the mass media and politicians shrilly compete with each other in a race to be the toughest on crime. Prisons are crammed to bursting point, and police powers and resources extended repeatedly. After decades of explosive increase in crime rates, these have plummeted throughout the Western world in the 1990s. Yet fear of crime and violence, and the security industries catering for these anxieties, grow relentlessly. Professor Robert Reiner's new book offers an up-to-date analysis of these contemporary trends by providing all honest and concerned citizens with a concise yet comprehensive survey of the sources of current problems and anxieties about crime. It shows that the dominant tough law and order approach to crime is based on fallacies about its nature, sources, and what works in terms of crime control. Instead it argues that the growth of crime has deep-seated causes, so that policing and penal policy at best can only temporarily hold a lid down on offending.
[click here for publisher's site]

 

25/09/07
'The State on the Streets' honoured by British Society of Criminology
Mercedes Hinton, Nuffield Research Fellow in the Law Department, has been recognised by the British Society of Criminology for her book The State on the Streets: Police and Politics in Argentina and Brazil. Dr Hinton's work was awarded a prize for Best Book of 2006, by a first-time author. Congratulations!

 

25/09/07
Nicola Lacey to give Clarendon Law Lectures
Professor Lacey will be delivering the prestigious Clarendon Lectures this year at Oxford University, on 31st October on 1st November. Her three lectures are entitled 'From Moll Flanders to Tess of the D’Urbervilles: Gender, Identity and Criminalisation' - see our Events page (select External Events or browse Forthcoming Lectures) for more information.

 

25/09/07
Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series - Second Issue Available
In this issue Nicola Lacey explores the changing conceptions of feminine agency in criminal law and literature 18th and 19th century England; Hugh Collins argues that private law is being reorientated to give weight to both individual and collective rights and explores the implications for public law in its extension into private relations; Tom Poole examines recent cases on counter-terrorism, analysing the judges' responses to government arguments on risk and secrecy, the 'conditions of uncertainty' that beset judicial reasoning in this context; and Virginia Mantouvalou asks whether closed shop arrangements are compatible with human rights law.
[click here for the Working Paper Series]

 

12/09/07
A police state? Crying wolf won’t protect civil liberties
If the left rejects every challenge to individual freedom, it will miss its chance to regain the influence lost under Blair. Article by Conor Gearty, professor of human rights law and director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights. His latest book, Civil Liberties, will be published next week.
[read Conor Gearty's article in The Guardian]
 

05/09/07
Dame Rosalyn HigginsDame Rosalyn Higgins awarded Balzan Prize
Dame Rosalyn Higgins, President of the International Court of Justice, formerly Professor of International Law at the London School of Economics, has been announced as the recipient of a prestigious Balzan Prize, awards established to promote culture, science and efforts to help humanity, peace and brotherhood. She was cited for her contributions toward the development of international law since World War II and writings and court decisions "in defense of the rule of law and human rights."
[read more in the International Herald Tribune]
 

04/09/07
Christopher Greenwood, QC, hired to argue detainees' rights case
The Canadian government has hired Christopher Greenwood, a professor of international law at the London School of Economics, to argue that Canada's military has no obligation to accord Afghan detainees Canadian-style legal rights.
[read more in The London Free Press]  [read more in Google News]

22/08/07
Act interpretations brought into question

Article discussing the Human Rights Act, which includes comments from Professor Francesca Klug, who believes the Act has been a success. She said: ‘It has been used by Prince Charles - twice, by asylum seekers, by disabled people. People have found they can rely on the Act when they have no other remedy.’ (Birmingham Post)
 

31/07/07
Ross Cranston, QC elected into the Fellowship of the British Academy ...
[read more]
 

Legal giants pour scorn on Labour's record ...
A group of the UK's most influential barristers, including the Law Department's Emeritus Professor, Michael Zander, QC,  has severely criticised the Labour Government’s treatment of the UK legal system over the past ten years ...
[read more in The Times]

 

24/07/07
Financial services law: a comparative study
Ross Cranston, QC, will speak at this event on Thursday 26th July ...
[read more]

 

18/07/07
Law Department launches Law, Society and Economy working paper series

The LSE Law Department is delighted to announce the launch of its Law, Society and Economy Working Paper Series. The series focuses on interdisciplinary legal scholarship in all subject areas from members of the LSE’s Law Department, doctoral students and visiting scholars. The papers are published electronically and are available online at http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/law/wps/wps.htm

The first papers published cover a wide range of topics: Giandomenico Majone uses the economic theory of clubs to conceptualise the EU's political and constitutional trajectory; Siva Thambisetty argues that patents should be understood as credence goods, and explores the practical and theoretical implications of this claim; Hans Lindhal develops a theory of distributive justice for immigration policy; and Francesca Klug asks whether the UK needs a Bill of Rights.

The Series is edited by Julia Black, David Kershaw and Nico Krisch, and the Assistant Editor is Alejandro Chehtman. For more details about the Series please see the Working Paper Series Web Site. For all queries please email law.working.papers@lse.ac.uk.

The Series is distributed on SSRN, and in addition to all UK law departments and to law faculties in a number of European universities.

 

17/07/07
Chehtman and Hood win teaching prizes
Alejandro Chehtman and David Hood have both been be awarded a Graduate Teaching Assistant Teaching Prize by the School worth £100, having been nominated by the department. We'd like to congratulate them both, and offer our thanks again for all their hard work during 2006/07!

 

17/07/07
Lord Chancellor to deliver address on constitutional reform
In what will be his first major speech since taking on leadership of constitutional reform, the Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor, Jack Straw, will deliver a keynote address at LSE on Wednesday 18 July. Mr Straw will be speaking at the launch of the LSE’s Future Britain project, a two-year initiative to explore the best and most appropriate processes for constitutional reform in the UK.  [read more]

 

10/07/07
Law Undergraduate wins prize
Congratulations to Reeba Doogal, who has won the LSE's CS MacTaggart prize. This prize is awarded for best degree performance across three years, and its award recognises Reeba as one of the very best students in the School.

 

10/07/07
Francesca Klug on the Westminster Hour

Professor Francesca Klug was interviewed this BBC programme on Sunday 8 July about human rights and people with learning difficulties.
[listen to the programme ...]

 

05/07/07
Herbert Smith to sponsor Law and Financial Markets Project
Leading international legal practice Herbert Smith will become the first Foundation Sponsor of the LSE Law and Financial Markets Project (LFMP), LSE announced this week. This Project carries out research into how law and regulation serve and interact with, financial market activity. It aims to provide a framework for collaboration between lawyers in the commercial world and those in academic institutions ...
[read more]

 

04/07/07
Rachel Condry on the BBC
Research Fellow, Rachel Condry, contributes to BBC Radio 4's Thinking Allowed, talking about her new book Families Shamed (see below).
[listen to the Thinking Allowed programme in full]

 

03/07/07
Gerry Simpson keynote speaker at Australian law forum
The National Museum of Australia played host to a delegation of international experts for the 15th annual Australian and New Zealand Society of International Law conference, Restoring the Rule of Law in International Affairs, last week. More than 50 speakers addressed the forum on issues including the United Nations and the rule of law, regional transnational crime and security, the future of polar governance and the domestic application of international law. Keynote speakers included London School of Economics professor Gerry Simpson.

 

13/06/07
Michael Zander on Today
Michael Zander, professor emeritus of law at LSE, appeared on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, discussing a study that has found that jurors are influenced by the race of a defendant.
[click here to listen to the discussion] [read more at inthenews.co.uk]

12/06/07
Virginia Mantouvalou'Labour Rights under the European Convention on Human Rights'
Congratulations to Virginia Mantouvalou who successfully defended her thesis during her viva for her PhD on June 6th before her examiners Professor K D Ewing (KCL) and Dr A.C.L. Davies (Oxford University). The title of the thesis, which she wrote under the supervision of Professor H. Collins, is Labour Rights under the European Convention on Human Rights. Virginia was a teaching assistant in the department and this year started as a lecturer at the University of Leicester.

04/06/07
'The Sins of the Sons'
Research Fellow, Rachel Condry, talks about her new book in the Daily Telegraph ...
[read the article here]

Charles Taylor Trial
Dr Chaloka Beyani, senior lecturer in Law at LSE, is interviewed on the BBC World Service on the trial of the former Liberian president ...
[read more about the trial here]

 

30/05/07
Forthcoming EU-China-WTO Research Seminar, 7th June:
'China's Environmental Challenge: Law and Policy'

 

15/05/07
Rachel Condry on the BBC
Research Fellow, Rachel Condry, contributes to BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour, talking about her new book Families Shamed (see below).
[listen to the Woman's Hour item]

 

15/05/07
Gerry Simpson on Detainee 002: The case of David Hicks
Gerry Simpson, Reader in Law, reviews a new book on Guantanamo and Australia, from Melbourne University Press ...
[read the review here]

 

15/05/07
LSE Student impresses Dechert LLP
Dechert LLP recently held a competition which offered students the opportunity to win a trip for two to New York. Entrants suggested ideas to improve the position of Dexter, a fictional Dechert Lawyer, who had encountered difficulties on a business trip. The aim was to highlight some of the key skills which the firm look for in recruits - namely the ability to think laterally and be resourceful. Yi Zhang, a second year law student at the LSE, was one of five runners-up. Dechert LLP judges praised the LSE student and said "Yi made us laugh with her entry, which was written from the perspective of Dexter's auntie dispensing advice to her nephew!" Yi will be attending a celebratory lunch at Dechert on 15 June, and she has been asked to submit an application where she will be offered an interview at Dechert's London office, for a training contract or work placement.

 

09/05/07
Families Shamed: the consequences of crime for relatives of serious offenders 
Research Fellow, Rachel Condry's new book
examines the experiences of relatives of those accused or convicted of serious crimes such as murder, manslaughter, rape and sex offences ...  [read more]

 

09/05/07
CONFERENCE:  'Techniques of Ownership: Artifacts, Inscriptions, Practices'  -  20th & 21st July
Click here for further information ...

 

08/05/07
JOB VACANCIES: Lectureships in Law advertised ...

02/05/07
'Criminal justice under Labour, ten years on'
Professor Robert Reiner is amongst the leading criminologists who give their verdict on ten years of criminal justice reform under New Labour in the latest edition of Criminal Justice Matters.
[download the article here]

 

28/04/07
'He has made the whole world weep'
Research Fellow, Rachel Condry, writes in the Guardian on the impact of serious offenders' crimes on their families ...
[read more in the Guardian]

 

25/04/07
Patents as credence goods
Dr Sivaramjani Thambisetty's paper 'Patents as credence goods' is first runner up in the 2007 Yale Information Society Project / IJCLP Writing Competition  [read abstract]

 

24/04/07
Create an international investment court to protect judicial independence, says LSE research
Western governments should establish an international investment court to replace the current system of investment treaty arbitration, says Gus Van Harten, legal researcher at the London School of Economics and Political Science ... [read more]

 

HM Treasury hire Paul Davies, QC for review of issuer liability
HM Treasury has hired Paul Davies QC, Cassel Professor of commercial law at the London School of Economics, to carry out a review of issuer liability and come up with some firm recommendations ...   [read more in Accountancy Age]

 

17/04/07
Virtual Law@LSE ... a new blog by Andrew Murray that tackles the latest developments in Information and Communications Technology Law from a UK perspective ... [read the Virtual Law@LSE blog]

 

12/04/07
Who wants to be a lawyer?
The College of Law has pledged £1.25m over five years, to be shared between five universities. The Sutton Trust will put in £250,000 and oversee the project called Pathways to Law. The five universities - Manchester, Leeds, Southampton, Warwick and the London School of Economics - are each to be partnered with a nearby College of Law. They will choose their students from the worst performing schools, and from low income households where no family members have attended university. The universities will nurture them, through a programme of careers days, work placements, law seminars and advice sessions.
[read more in the Independent]

 

27/03/07
MediaPal@LSE : Comment and Sources on Media Policy and Law launched
A broad range of research into media policy and law issues is ongoing at LSE. This covers the full gamut of concerns, from media diversity and pluralism, through copyright and culture, regulating media market structure, defamation and privacy issues, cyberspace regulation and more. MediaPal is new blog from Anne Barron (Law), Dev Gangjee (Law), Andrew Murray (Law), Andrew Scott (Law) and Damian Tambini (Media and Communications) providing ongoing commentary on all these areas ... [read the MediaPal@LSE blog]

 

22/03/07
Help for poorer pupils to win places on law courses
A plan to break the stranglehold of privately educated judges, barristers and solicitors on the legal profession was announced last night. Five universities are to target sixth form students from poorer backgrounds and no family history of university, helping them with applications and interviews and then providing mentoring through their law courses. Leeds, Manchester, Southampton, Warwick and LSE could be helping 750 students a year by 2010, who could form about one in eight of the 6,000 solicitors who enter the next stage of their career path.
[read more in the Guardian] | [read more from LSE Press and Information]

 

20/03/07
International Law prize for LSE student
Lucy Dannatt
Lucinda Dannatt, an LLM student at LSE in 2005-2006, has been awarded the University of London Georg Schwarzenberger prize in International Law for 2006. This prize is awarded to the best overall student in international law from among the Colleges of the University of London. The Law Department extends its warm congratulations to Lucinda on this outstanding achievement. Since graduating from the LSE, Lucinda has worked for the war crimes court in Bosnia and at the European Court of Human Rights. ‘I am both delighted and honoured to have been awarded the prize’ she said.

 

13/03/07
Lord Wedderburn speaks out in Prince Charles documentary ...

 

07/03/07
Professor Dianne Otto gives the annual Shimizu Lecture in International Law ...

 

13/02/07
Postgraduate Research Studentships announced ...

 

24/01/07
Big loss of support for civil liberties
Changes in political rhetoric rather than fear of terrorism appear to be a key driver in the change of attitudes, said Conor Gearty, professor of human rights law at the London School of Economics and co-author of a new study ...
[read more in the Financial Times] | [read more in the Guardian]

 

22/01/07
Professor Robert Baldwin writes to the Times on Big Brother ...

 

09/01/07
Details of LSE-PKU Summer School announced ...
The 4th LSE-PKU Summer School in Beijing will running between 13 August 2007 – 25 August 2007. The Summer School is a collaboration between the London School of Economics and Peking University two of the world's leading institutions for teaching and research. Courses include The WTO and Dilemmas of Law Today: Globalization, Regulation and Governance ... [read more]

 

09/01/07
Lectureship / Senior Lectureship vacancies announced ...

 

02/01/07
President of Human Rights Council appoints Christine Chinkin to serve on high-level fact-finding mission Christine Chinkin

The president of the United Nations Human Rights Council, Luis Alfonso De Alba, has appointed Christine Chinkin, professor of international law at LSE, as a member of the high-level fact-finding mission in connection with the Israeli military operations in Beit Hanoun (northern Gaza Strip) on 8 November that resulted in the deaths of at least 18 civilians. ... [read more]

 

29/11/06
Students' mooting victory at ESU Essex Court Moot ...

 


The Regulation of Cyberspace29/11/06
New Book : The Regulation of Cyberspace, by Andrew Murray
In The Regulation of Cyberspace Andrew Murray examines the development and design of regulatory structures in the online environment. The book considers current practices and suggests a regulatory model that acknowledges its complexity and how it can be used by regulators to provide a more comprehensive regulatory structure for cyberspace ...

[read more about 'The Regulation of Cyberspace' by Andrew Murray]

29/11/06
The Rule of Law : The European Dimension

Jonathan Faull Jonathan Faull, European Commission, Director General for Justice, Freedom and Security, gives a public lecture at the LSE.

 



 


22/11/06
The Rule of Law : Form and Substance
Lord Justice Laws, who has been Lord Justice of Appeal since 1999, gives a public lecture at the LSE.


13/11/06
Rosalyn HigginsThe ICJ, the United Nations system and the rule of law
Judge Rosalyn Higgins (President of ICJ) lectures on 'The ICJ, the United Nations system and the rule of law'

"Dicey famously identified three principles which together establish the rule of law: “(1) the absolute supremacy or predominance of regular law as opposed to the influence of arbitrary power; (2) equality before the law or the equal subjection of all classes to the ordinary law of the land administered by the ordinary courts; and (3) the law of the constitution is a consequence of the rights of individuals as defined and enforced by the courts.” How then, in this national model, should an “international law of rule” look? ...

[click here for a transcript]

09/11/06
Gearty - Ignatieff's nemesis?
 

08/11/06
The Rule of Law and Human Rights

Cherie BoothCherie Booth QC gives a public lecture on The Rule of Law and Human Rights. 

In recent times the great advance in human rights discussion has to an extent eclipsed the truism that without the rule of law and its institutional features these rights will not be realised in practice. This lecture is one of a series of lectures focusing on the various aspects of the Rule of Law. The series is organised by the LSE Law Department and Clifford Chance in conjunction with JUSTICE.

 

01/11/06
Book Launch
The State on the StreetsMercedes Hinton, Research Fellow in the Law Department, will launch her new book 'The State on the Streets:  Police and Politics in Argentina and Brazil', with a seminar on Tuesday, November 7th, 2006, 5pm in the Graham Wallis Room, LSE, entitled 'Crime, Corruption and Cover-up:  Police and the State in Argentina and Brazil', followed by a wine reception in the Senior Common Room. Please  RSVP by email to Rachel Yarham.

[read more about 'The State on the Streets']

25/10/06
EU Advocate General Miguel Poiares Maduro to speak on European Integration (2 November 2006) ...
 

17/10/06
Wedderburn quits Labour ...
 

17/10/06
LSE Law Professor appointed honorary QC Paul Davies

Professor Paul Davies of LSE's Law Department was officially appointed an honorary Queen's Counsel (QC) at a ceremony in Westminster Hall on Monday 16 October.  Professor Davies has been Cassel Professor of Commercial Law at the School since 1998. He has written widely on company law and employment law, and is the editor of the Industrial Law Journal. He played a major part in the recent Company Law Review and other policy working groups. He is also an alumnus of the School, having graduated with an LLM in 1969. He was elected a fellow of the British Academy in 2000. He has been a visiting professor at Yale, Bordeaux, Bonn, Witwatersrand and the Rand Afrikaans University. Before joining LSE, he previously taught at the University of Oxford (as Fellow in Law at Balliol College and Professor of the Law of the Enterprise in the University) .... [read more]


10/10/06
'The Constitutional Thought of the Levellers' - a Current Legal Problems lecture by Martin Loughlin, to be held 19 October 2006 ...
 

10/10/06
CURRENT VACANCIES : Chairs / Readers in Law ...
 

03/10/06
'The Promise of Justice' lecture series announced ...
 

28/09/06
LLM Specialist Seminars announced
 

14/09/06
Cumberland Lodge Weekend for Staff and Students announced (Jan 12 - 14)

Cumberland LodgeCumberland Lodge is a Royal House set in the picturesque surroundings of the Great Park, Windsor. Every year the Law Department arranges a weekend away for staff and students, the purpose of which is to create an informal and friendly environment where issues related to the law can be discussed. The discussions centre around a series of lectures given by a number of notable speakers, some of whom come from the legal profession. In previous years, we have had a number of High Court Judges, members of the Press Council, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Prisons and the Prisons Ombudsman. The lectures usually cover a great diversity of topics and disciplines, ranging from, for instance, international human rights and environmental protection to contemporary problems in company law and criminal justice reform. .... [read more]


29/11/06
Students' mooting victory at ESU Essex Court Moot ...

 


The Regulation of Cyberspace29/11/06
New Book : The Regulation of Cyberspace, by Andrew Murray
In The Regulation of Cyberspace Andrew Murray examines the development and design of regulatory structures in the online environment. The book considers current practices and suggests a regulatory model that acknowledges its complexity and how it can be used by regulators to provide a more comprehensive regulatory structure for cyberspace ...

[read more about 'The Regulation of Cyberspace' by Andrew Murray]

29/11/06
The Rule of Law : The European Dimension

Jonathan Faull Jonathan Faull, European Commission, Director General for Justice, Freedom and Security, gives a public lecture at the LSE.

 



 


22/11/06
The Rule of Law : Form and Substance
Lord Justice Laws, who has been Lord Justice of Appeal since 1999, gives a public lecture at the LSE.


13/11/06
Rosalyn HigginsThe ICJ, the United Nations system and the rule of law
Judge Rosalyn Higgins (President of ICJ) lectures on 'The ICJ, the United Nations system and the rule of law'

"Dicey famously identified three principles which together establish the rule of law: “(1) the absolute supremacy or predominance of regular law as opposed to the influence of arbitrary power; (2) equality before the law or the equal subjection of all classes to the ordinary law of the land administered by the ordinary courts; and (3) the law of the constitution is a consequence of the rights of individuals as defined and enforced by the courts.” How then, in this national model, should an “international law of rule” look? ...

[click here for a transcript]

09/11/06
Gearty - Ignatieff's nemesis?
 

08/11/06
The Rule of Law and Human Rights

Cherie BoothCherie Booth QC gives a public lecture on The Rule of Law and Human Rights. 

In recent times the great advance in human rights discussion has to an extent eclipsed the truism that without the rule of law and its institutional features these rights will not be realised in practice. This lecture is one of a series of lectures focusing on the various aspects of the Rule of Law. The series is organised by the LSE Law Department and Clifford Chance in conjunction with JUSTICE.

 

01/11/06
Book Launch
The State on the StreetsMercedes Hinton, Research Fellow in the Law Department, will launch her new book 'The State on the Streets:  Police and Politics in Argentina and Brazil', with a seminar on Tuesday, November 7th, 2006, 5pm in the Graham Wallis Room, LSE, entitled 'Crime, Corruption and Cover-up:  Police and the State in Argentina and Brazil', followed by a wine reception in the Senior Common Room. Please  RSVP by email to Rachel Yarham.

[read more about 'The State on the Streets']

25/10/06
EU Advocate General Miguel Poiares Maduro to speak on European Integration (2 November 2006) ...
 

17/10/06
Wedderburn quits Labour ...
 

17/10/06
LSE Law Professor appointed honorary QC Paul Davies

Professor Paul Davies of LSE's Law Department was officially appointed an honorary Queen's Counsel (QC) at a ceremony in Westminster Hall on Monday 16 October.  Professor Davies has been Cassel Professor of Commercial Law at the School since 1998. He has written widely on company law and employment law, and is the editor of the Industrial Law Journal. He played a major part in the recent Company Law Review and other policy working groups. He is also an alumnus of the School, having graduated with an LLM in 1969. He was elected a fellow of the British Academy in 2000. He has been a visiting professor at Yale, Bordeaux, Bonn, Witwatersrand and the Rand Afrikaans University. Before joining LSE, he previously taught at the University of Oxford (as Fellow in Law at Balliol College and Professor of the Law of the Enterprise in the University) .... [read more]


10/10/06
'The Constitutional Thought of the Levellers' - a Current Legal Problems lecture by Martin Loughlin, to be held 19 October 2006 ...
 

10/10/06
CURRENT VACANCIES : Chairs / Readers in Law ...
 

03/10/06
'The Promise of Justice' lecture series announced ...
 

28/09/06
LLM Specialist Seminars announced
 

14/09/06
Cumberland Lodge Weekend for Staff and Students announced (Jan 12 - 14)

Cumberland LodgeCumberland Lodge is a Royal House set in the picturesque surroundings of the Great Park, Windsor. Every year the Law Department arranges a weekend away for staff and students, the purpose of which is to create an informal and friendly environment where issues related to the law can be discussed. The discussions centre around a series of lectures given by a number of notable speakers, some of whom come from the legal profession. In previous years, we have had a number of High Court Judges, members of the Press Council, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Prisons and the Prisons Ombudsman. The lectures usually cover a great diversity of topics and disciplines, ranging from, for instance, international human rights and environmental protection to contemporary problems in company law and criminal justice reform. .... [read more]

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