Events

Events


Lent term seminars and events 2018

Cañada Blanch events are free and open to the public. Specific events requiring registration will be clearly marked. To receive up-to-date information about our events, subscribe to our mailing list at cbcentre@lse.ac.uk.

Thursday 1 February 2018

LSE Hispanic Society Debate
What Next for Spain and Catalonia?
Session 1: The Historical Roots of the Present Catalan Crisis
Speakers: John Elliott, Felipe Fernández-Armesto and Paul Preston
Moderator: Conxa Rodríguez Vives
Time: 19:30 h.
Place: LSE, 99 Aldwych, Clement House, Room 6.02
In collaboration with Cañada Blanch Centre and Catalan Observatory-LSE
Find out more


Tuesday 6 February 2018

Spanish in Motion-LSE
Screening of the documentary film En tierra extraña (In a Foreign Land)
Dir. Icíar Bollaín. Spain, 2014, 72 mins. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Time: 18:30 h.
Place: LSE, 54 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, New Academic Building, The Wolfson Theatre
A collaboration of Language Centre-LSE, Cañada Blach Centre-LSE, Instituto Cervantes-London, and University of Roehampton
Find out more


Wednesday 7 February 2018

Cañada Blanch Seminar
The Triumph of Arturo Barea
Speakers: Michael Eaude (Journalist and Author) and Prof. Paul Preston
Time: 19 h.
Place: Instituto Cervantes London, 15-19 Devereux Court, London WC2R 3JJ
In collaboration with Instituto Cervantes-London
Registration

Thursday 8 February 2018

LSE Hispanic Society Debate
What Next for Spain and Catalonia?
Session 2: Spain and Catalonia. Is There a Way Out of the Impasse? 
Speakers: Jonathan Hopkin, Sandra León and Toni Rodon
Moderator: Antonio Barroso 
Time: 19:30 h.
Place: LSE, 99 Aldwych, Clement House, Room 6.02
In collaboration with Catalan Observatory-LSE
Find out more

Wednesday 14 February 2018

LSE Hispanic Society Debate
What Next for Spain and Catalonia?
Session 3: The Economic Dimension of the Catalan Crisis 
Speakers: Antonio Cabrales, Ángel de la Fuente, Jordi Galí, Ramon Marimon and Andreu Mas-Colell
Moderator: Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela 
Time: 18:30 h.
Place: LSE, Clement’s Inn, Tower 1, Room G.01
In collaboration with Catalan Observatory-LSE
Find out more

Thursday 15 February 2018

Cañada Blanch Seminar
What Brexit means for Spain
Speaker: Joaquín Almunia (Chairman of the Centre for European Policy Studies and former Vice President of the European Commission)
Chair: Prof. Paul Preston
Time: 18 h.
Place: LSE, Portugal Street, Cowdray House, 1st floor, Seminar Room 1.11
Find out more


Thursday 22 February 2018

LSE Hispanic Society Debate
What Next for Spain and Catalonia?
Session 4: Is There a Right to Self-Determination in the International Context? 
Speakers: Manuel Arias Maldonado, Sebastian Balfour, Montserrat Guibernau and Fernando Vallespín
Moderator: Julio Crespo MacLennan 
Time: 19:30 h.
Place: LSE, 99 Aldwych, Clement House, Room 6.02
In collaboration with Catalan Observatory-LSE
Find out more


Thursday 1 March 2018

Cañada Blanch Seminar
Spaniards in the NKVD and the Murder of Trotsky: A Reassessment
Speaker: Boris Volodarsky (CBC-LSE)
Chair: Prof. Paul Preston
Time: 18 h.
Place: LSE, Portugal Street, Cowdray House, 1st floor, Seminar Room 1.11
Find out more


Thursday 15 March 2018

Cañada Blanch Seminar
Title TBA
Speakers: Mercedes Kemp and Prof. Helen Graham (Royal Holloway)
Chair: Prof. Paul Preston
Time: 18 h.
Place: LSE, Portugal Street, Cowdray House, 1st floor, Seminar Room 1.11

 


 

Michaelmas term 2017

14-16 September 2017

University of Nottingham
Conference The Archeology of the Spanish Civil War: Searching for Federico García Lorca and Shaping the Memory Debate in Spain
Including plenary lecture by Prof. Paul Preston on Thursday 14th
Time: 18:30 h.
Place: University of Nottingham, Trent Building, Room C7 

Saturday 23 September 2017

Hay Festival
Prof. Paul Preston in conversation with Miguel Aguilar. The Future of History
Time: 11 h.
Place: Palacio Quintanar, C/ San Agustín s/n, 40001 Segovia, Spain

Tuesday 3 October 2017

Cañada Blanch Event
Screening of the film La maleta mexicana (The Mexican Suitcase)
Dir. Trisha Ziff. Mexico, Spain, France & USA, 2011, 86 mins. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Followed by a Q&A with Prof. Paul Preston and film director Trisha Ziff
Time: 18:30 h.
Place: King's College London, Strand Building, Room S-3.20, London WC2R 2LS
In collaboration with Centro de Estudios Mexicanos UNAM, Instituto Cervantes and King's College London


Thursday 12 October 2017

Cañada Blanch Seminar
Cinema serving the nation: Spanish featured films 1939-1975
Speaker: Dr. Gabriela Viadero (LSE Postdoctoral Researcher)
Chair: Prof. Paul Preston
Time: 18 h.
Place: LSE, Portugal Street, Cowdray House, 1st floor, Seminar Room 1.11

Abstract

Cinema deserves a great deal of attention from those who study the creation of the nation and its identity in the 20th century, since it has been the most powerful tool for cultural dissemination and homogenization during that century. In the case of the Franco dictatorship regime, the films produced between 1939 and 1975 were tightly controlled through censorship, repression and funding. The images of the nation projected in more than four hundred and fifty films form part of an unquestionable nationalist discourse present to a greater or lesser degree. This discourse was focused on six main subjects: the origins and splendour of Spain, defensive wars, imperial Spain, Catholic Spain, romantic-folkloric Spain and modern Spain.  How the regime promoted these images, created new images and exploited older ones is the subject of this seminar.

Gabriela Viadero

Viadero12-10-17

Dr Gabriela Viadero Carral is a Spanish academic, specialist in nationalism and national identity. She has published several academic and informative articles about the relationship among cinema, nation-building and identity, and is the author of the book Cinema serving the nation (Marcial Pons, 2016), in which she studies the Spanish imagined community in the feature films produced in Spain under the Franco regime between 1939 and 1975.

 

Thursday 26 October 2017

Cañada Blanch Seminar
Brexit and other challenges for Spain
Speaker: William Chislett (Real Instituto Elcano)
Chair: Prof. Sebastian Balfour
Time: 18 h.
Place: LSE, Portugal Street, Cowdray House, 1st floor, Seminar Room 1.11

Abstract

The Spain-UK relation has become increasingly significant in terms of trade, direct investment, tourism, fisheries and the number of Britons living in Spain, by far the largest group of British expats in any European country. Consequently, Spain has good reasons for wanting the best possible Brexit deal. A ‘hard’ Brexit could be particularly damaging for Spain. A potential stumbling block is the age-old problem of Gibraltar, the UK overseas territory, ceded to Britain under the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713 and long claimed by Spain. Ninety-six percent of Gibraltarians voted in the Brexit referendum in favour of remaining in the EU. The UK’s exit from the EU will make the Rock’s border with Spain an external and not an internal EU frontier and in an extreme situation could be closed. Some 12,000 people who work in Gibraltar cross the border every day from Spain. Madrid offered Gibraltar co-sovereignty as a way for the Rock to continue to be part of the EU, but this was roundly rejected.
Meanwhile the economy has finally recovered its pre-crisis (2008) GDP level, but unemployment remains stubbornly high at 17%, albeit down from a peak of 27% in 2013. Some 1.5 million more jobs are needed to recover the pre-crisis employment level. Most of the new jobs are on temporary contracts, some for as short as a day. Political life has become much more vibrant. Two insurgent parties, the centrist Ciudadanos and the far left Podemos, won a significant number of seats in the June 2016 election and are holding the minority Popular Party government to account.
In Catalonia, some 2.3 million people defied the central government and police batons and voted on October 1st in the unconstitutional referendum on secession. Spain faced its most serious political and constitutional crisis since the failed 1981 coup.

William Chislett

Chislett26-10-17-747x560

William Chislett reported on Spain's 1975-78 transition to democracy for The Times and between 1978 and 1984 he was based in Mexico City for The Financial Times. He returned to Madrid permanently in 1986. The Real Instituto Elcano, Spain's leading think tank whose honorary chairman is King Felipe VI, has published four books of his on Spain. He has spoken on Spain at the universities of Harvard, Princeton, Chicago, London School of Economics, Oxford and The Economist Roundtable on Spain, and has been a visiting scholar at the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Centre, New York University, and at Bilkent University, Ankara. Oxford University Press (OUP) published his book on Spain in 2013 in its well-known series What Everyone Needs to Know.

 

Thursday 9 November 2017

Catalan Observatory Seminar
An Urge for Dictatorship: The Fragile Liberalism of the Catalan Urban Elite, 1850-1923
Speaker: Dr. Angel Smith (University of Leeds)
Chair: Prof. Sebastian Balfour
Time: 18 h.
Place: LSE, Portugal Street, Cowdray House, 1st floor, Seminar Room 1.11

Abstract

This paper centres on the ideology and political practice of Catalan business elites from the 1850s through to the 1923 coup d'etat by General Miguel Primo de Rivera. In the years previous to the coup Catalan business had shown great interest in Benito Mussolini and received the establishment of dictatorship in Spain positively. This stance, I argue, has long-term roots. Business elites and men close to them within the liberal professions had between the 1830s and 1850s supported key liberal reforms. However, they were also afraid of the popular ferment unleashed by the liberal revolution. And in response they looked to recapture what they saw as the stability of the Old Order. They gave strong support to the Catholic Church, whose doctrines and charitable work they saw as promoting social stability. Moreover, like the Church they adopted an organicist vision of society. This opened the door to the adoption of an anti-liberal corporatist critique of the Spanish political system. This first became apparent in the late nineteenth century and was again on show between 1918 and 1923. Key planks of this anti-liberal discourse were the argument that the suffrage should be exercised through corporations not thorough individuals, that the old guild system could be reconstructed to stabilise labour relations, and that strong leaders were necessary to maintain order. I conclude with some broader reflections. Historians have generally seen business elites as "conservative liberals" and yet from mid-nineteenth century aspects of their world view sat uneasily with and had the potential to clash with liberal ideals. This gives us an insight into the reasons behind the growing crisis of liberalism from the 1900s, not only in Spain but also in a wider European context.

Angel Smith

Smith9Oct17

Angel Smith completed his PhD at Queen Mary College. He worked at Staffordshire University and the University of Southampton before moving on to the University of Leeds in 1998, where he is currently Reader in Modern Spanish History.
He has written on social and political conflict in early twentieth-century Spain, focusing in particular on the rise of anarcho-syndicalism in early twentieth century Spain and on the reasons behind the fall of Spain's Restoration Monarchy in 1923. He has also undertaken work on the Catalan social elites in the nineteenth and early twentieth century and published the book The Origins of Catalan Nationalism, 1770-1898 (Palgrave, 2014). His current project is a book entitled Orientalism, Race and the Nation. The National Question in Spain, 1875-1923.

 

Thursday 30 November 2017

Cañada Blanch Seminar
Religious Violence in the Spanish Civil War: Icononclasm and Crusade
Speaker: Prof. Mary Vincent (University of Sheffield)
Chair: Prof. Sebastian Balfour
Time: 18 h.
Place: LSE, Portugal Street, Cowdray House, 1st floor, Seminar Room 1.11

Abstract

The Spanish Civil War starkly reveals the patterns of assault and retribution that define religious violence, providing an example of extreme religious violence with two clearly defined antagonists, Catholics and anticlericals. Such bifurcation is typical: Real and imagined enemies feed the sense of threat that itself contributes to extremism.  In the case of Spain, an anticlerical revolution took place within a conflict regarded by the other side as a crusade. As what was held sacred came under attack, so its defenders-often self-styled-sought retribution. The conviction with which religious faith is held by at least a minority is a contributory factor here, as is the way monotheistic traditions privilege eschatological understandings of violence using prophetic, ahistorical terms such as martyrdom, sacrifice, redemption, and sacrilege. This seminar will look at such terms through a focus on iconoclasm, which as an embodied act, whose explanation is rooted in a specific historical context, is accessible to historians in a way that belief is not. Churches and images-seen as a locus of divine power-came under systematic attack; retributive violence followed this assault on God. The seminar arises from a Leverhulme-funded project on religious violence in the Spanish Civil War and looks specifically at how iconoclastic violence develops as a symbiotic process.

Mary Vincent

Vincent30-11-2017

Mary Vincent is Professor of Modern European History at the University of Sheffield and currently holds a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship.  She is the author of Spain 1833-2002: People and State (OUP, 2007) and Catholicism in the Second Spanish Republic: Religion and Politics in Salamanca, 1930-6 (OUP, 1996) and has published widely on gender, fascism, and the relationship between religion and right-wing politics in modern Spain.

 

 

ViaderoRoom12Oct17
Cinema serving the nation: Spanish featured films 1939-1975, Cañada Blanch Centre academic seminar with Dr. Gabriela Viadero and Prof. Paul Preston, 12 October 2017.