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Events

The III events bring some of the world's biggest academic names to the LSE to explore the challenge of global inequality. See below for upcoming events.

 Upcoming events Michaelmas Term 2017

Cristobal Young

The Myth of Millionaire Tax Flight: how place still matters for the rich

Speaker: Dr Christobal Young (Stanford University)

Discussant: Dr Andrew Summers (LSE) and Rt Hon Ed Miliband MP (subject to parliamentary business)

Chair: Professor Nicola Lacey (LSE)

If taxes rise, will they leave? Cristobal Young presents his findings from the first-ever large-scale study of migration of the world’s richest individuals, drawing on special access to over 45 million US tax returns, together with Forbes rich lists. He shows that contrary to popular opinion, although the rich have the resources and capacity to flee high-tax places, their actual migration is surprisingly limited. Place still matters, even in today’s globalised world.

Walter Scheidel

The Great Leveler: violence and economic inequality from the Stone Age to the future

Speaker: Professor Walter Scheidel (Stanford University)

27th November 2017, 6.30-8pm, Sheikh Zayed Theatre

For thousands of years, economic inequality has been a defining feature of civilization. Only violent shocks have significantly reduced inequality: mass-mobilization warfare, transformative revolutions, state collapse, and catastrophic plagues. This lecture examines these processes over the long run of history, and considers the prospects of levelling in today's more stable world.

This lecture is funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. Read about the III's partnership with JRF here.

Paul

Inequalities Seminar: Inequality and Service

Speaker: Dr Paul Segal 

28th November, 12.30-1.45pm, TW2.9.05 

The study of economic inequality is fundamentally concerned with differing entitlements over goods and services. Yet this means that economists of inequality have so far neglected an aspect of inequality discussed by social commentators at least since Rousseau: that it also implies that one person is entitled to command another person, owing to their differing economic positions. This talk proposes a measure of this form of inequality called the service ratio, and argues that the ability of the rich to command the labour of the non-rich for their own satisfaction is a socially and political salient feature of economic inequality. The ability to employ domestic service is essential to conceptions of the upper middle class lifestyle in many countries, and has also been essential to rising female labour market participation. Paul Segal calculates service ratios in a selection of countries over time, and illustrate the relationship between this measure and other standard measures of inequality.

BSA logo

Workshop: A case-study of ‘socio-genetic understanding’: Robbins on Bourdieu, 1970-2017

Speakers include: Yusef Bakkali (University of Sussex), Ray Campbell, Stephanie Lacey (University Campus Barnsley), Lisa Mckenzie (Middlesex University), Nirmal Puwar (Goldsmiths), Diane Reay (LSE), Derek Robbins (UEL), Marco Santoro (University of Bologna), Mike Savage (LSE III)

5th December 2017, 9.30am-5pm, venue at LSE tbc

The BSA Bourdieu Study Group is delighted to announce that it will be hosting a special workshop in honour of Derek Robbins entitled: “Robbins on Bourdieu, 1970-2017, A case-study of ‘socio-genetic understanding’”. This workshop is supported by the Institute of Inequalities (LSE). The workshop will explore the development of Derek Robbins’s predisposition to study the work of Bourdieu, and his early encounters with Bourdieu. It will argue that all intellectual works should be understood by reference to their contexts of production rather than in terms of predefined, abstracted disciplinary discourses and offer paradigmatic example of the reflexive response to Bourdieu recommended for all participants.

The day will be divided into five sessions: Methodological presentation, Robbins and Bourdieu up to 1990, Robbins and Bourdieu, 1990-2002, Robbins and Bourdieu, 2002 to the present. The final session will consider Robbins’ attempts after Bourdieu’s death to treat the transmission of his work as a case-study of the international transfer of social science concepts, first in respect of Franco-British transfer and then in respect of occidental-oriental transfer. This analysis involves an application of socio-genetic understanding and, as such, runs counter to the increasing tendency to appropriate Bourdieu’s work for an international sociological discourse.

This event is free, but registration is compulsory. Places will be strictly limited and those registering will be expected to complete a 100-200-word blurb on their research interests and motives for wanting to attend this workshop. You will also be expected to do a number of readings in advance of this workshop. These will be circulate after registration. Please register here.

For any inquiries related to this workshop, please contact organiser Jenny Thatcher (Lancaster) j.thatcher@lancaster.ac.uk and Laura Bentley (UWE) laura2.bentley@live.uwe.ac.uk

Thomas Shapiro

Toxic Inequality in the United States: economic equality and racial injustice driving ugly politics

Speaker: Professor Thomas Shapiro (Brandeis University)

18th January, 6.30-8pm, Hong Kong Theatre

Toxic Inequality examines a powerful and unprecedented convergence in the United States: historic and rising levels of wealth and income inequality in an era of stalled mobility, intersecting with a widening racial wealth gap, all against the backdrop of changing racial and ethnic demographics.

This event is funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

Ground down by growth

Book Launch: "Ground Down by Growth: Tribe, Caste, Class and Inequality in 21st Century India"

Speakers: Dr Alpa Shah (LSE Anthropology), Dr Jens Lerche (SOAS) and Professor Phillippe Bourgois (University of California)

Chair: Professor Katy Gardner (Department of Anthropology)

25th January 2018, 6.30-8pm, Old Theatre

This book launch examines how economic growth in India entrenches social difference of tribe, caste and class and has transformed identity-based discrimination into new forms of exploitation and oppression.

Alpa Shah is Associate Professor – Reader in Anthropology at the LSE. She has written on indigenous rights, social inequality, labor migration, affirmative action, emancipatory politics and revolutionary insurgency. She has lived for four and half years as an anthropologist in remote parts of the eastern Indian state of Jharkhand amongst Adivasi (tribal) people.

Dr Jens Lerche is a Reader in Labour and Agrarian Studies at SOAS. He has worked on Dalits, rural and migrant labour and agrarian relations in India for more than two decades. 

Philippe Bourgois is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California at Los Angeles. He works on social inequality, violence, substance abuse, incarceration, homelessness, mental illness, and ethnic segregation/conflict. His work began in Central America in 1979 (Nicaragua, El Salvador, Costa Rica and Panama) documenting the revolutionary movements and political repression. Since 1985 his primary work has been in the US inner city, with crack and heroin sellers and injectors, and mental illness.

This event is co-hosted with the LSE Department of Anthropology. There will be a post-lecture reception in the "Behind the Indian Boom" photo exhibition in the LSE Atrium. 

Akwugo Emejulu

Minority Women's Activism in Tough Times

Co-hosted with Department of Gender Studies

Speaker: Professor Akwugo Emejulu (University of Warwick)

31st January 2018, 6.30-8pm, venue TBC

More information coming shortly.

  

Previous Events

2017

Anne Power

Inequalities Seminar: Can Social Landlords Make Private Renting Work Better?

Speaker: Professor Anne Power

Chair: Dr Aaron Reeves

14th November 2017, 12.30-1.45pm, TW2.9.05

In this seminar, Professor Anne Power and Alice Belotti presented findings from interviews with, and analysis of, 20 social landlords, three private landlords and two housing charities on how social landlords can make the private rented sector more secure, better quality and more affordable for tenants.

Podcast coming shortly.

Parteciparte

What We Treasure We Measure: a theatrical engagement with gender in/equality

PartecipArte Theatre Company

8th November 2017, 6.30-8pm, Old Theatre

PartecipArte engage with gender inequality in the European Union using 'Theatre of the Oppressed' theatrical forms to analyse, understand and tackle multiple dimensions of gender in/equality by exposing them on stage. PartecipArte presented a 'theatrical PowerPoint' which showed, with human slides and living statues, the different ways to approach gender equality and the current situation of gender equality in the European Union. Inspired by the Gender Equality Index, the theatrical PowerPoint highlighted how men and women are assigned different responsibilities, rights, benefits and opportunities in the activities they perform, in access to the control of resources and in decision-making processes. The slides explain the unfavourable situation of women in all of the six core domains composing the Gender Equality Index – work, money, knowledge, time, power and health - and in the satellite domain of violence against women. In turn, the audience becomes the protagonist and the author of a new PowerPoint, asking should we accept those stories or can we change them?

This event is funded by the Atlantic Fellows programme, and co-hosted with the LSE Departments of Gender Studies and Statistics.

Video recording available here.

Heat Greed and Human Need

Book Launch: Heat, Greed and Human Need: Climate Change, Capitalism and Sustainable Wellbeing

Professor Ian Gough (Visiting Professor, LSE CASE) presents his new book (Edward Elgar 2017)

Chair: Dame Professor Judith Rees (Vice-chair of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the LSE)

Discussant: Kate Raworth (Oxford University Environmental Change Institute; author of Doughnut Economics

8th November, 6.30, Shaw Library

This event was supported by CASE, GRI and the III at LSE, and Edwar Elgar Ltd.

National Theatre building

National Debate: Class - an unequal nation

Hosted by the National Theatre

Speakers: Dawn Foster (Author of Lean Out), Abid Hussain (Director of Diversity, Arts Council England), David Lammy MP, Mike Savage (Martin White Professor of Sociology, LSE)

Chair: Anushka Asthana (Guardian joint Political Editor)

2nd November 2017, 5.45-6.45pm, National Theatre

A panel explored how class affects our chosen path in life, and how easy is it to break out of the social hierarchy. Is the class system still relevant in 21st-century Britain? The National Theatre presented a debate inspired by the production of Saint George and the Dragon

Darren Walker

Investing in Equality: the role of capital and justice in addressing inequality

Speaker: Darren Walker (President of the Ford Foundation)

Chair: Professor Julia Black (Interim Director, LSE)

1st November, 6.30-8pm, Sheikh Zayed Theatre

Philanthropic organisations play a key role in challenging the causes, effects, and consequences of inequality, funding projects that aim to directly and indirectly reduce the inequality gap. However questions have been raised about the approach, direction and priorities of such wealthy organisations when funding projects to tackle inequality, and the effect of these projects on the beneficiaries and the economy as a whole.

The Ford Foundation has identified inequality as the central issue of our time. Darren Walker, President of Ford Foundation, discussed the work and focus of the Ford Foundation, and the greater role of Philanthropy in reducing inequality.

This event is funded by the Atlantic Fellows programme.

Video recording available here.

Nicola Lacey

British Academy lecture: Women, Crime and Character in the Twentieth Century

Speaker: Professor Nicola Lacey FBA CBE (III)

Chair: Professor Sarah Worthington QC(Hon), FBA, University of Cambridge

26 October 2017, 6-7.15pm, British Academy, 10-11 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AH

The Twentieth Century saw decisive changes in women’s legal, social, economic and political position.  But how far have these changes been reflected in women’s position as subjects of criminalisation in the courts, in legal thought or in literary fiction?   This lecture took up the story of the gradual marginalisation of criminal women in both legal and literary history, asking whether a criminal heroine such as Moll Flanders (1722) is thinkable again, and what this can tell us about conceptions of women as subjects of criminal law.  How far do the conceptions of, and dilemmas about, female subjectivity, agency, capacity and character which emerge successively in 20th Century literary culture reflect and illuminate the relevant patterns and debates in criminal law and philosophy? 

Paul Willman

Inequalities Seminar: Do Firms Manage Pay Inequality? 

Speaker: Professor Paul Willman

24 October, 12.30-1.45pm, TW2 9.04

This talk examined the role of the modern firm in the creation of inequality of income. Specifically, it examined the growth in the use of asset based rewards for senior executives, combined with continued use of salaried rewards for other employees, and the impact this has on measures of inequality both within the firm and society. If asset values tend to outstrip GDP then, other things equal, policies that reward one group with assets and others with wages will increase income inequality within the firm over time. Willman further argued that, since employment in firms that use asset based rewards for executives remains a substantial proportion of overall employment, the use of the firm as the unit of analysis for the examination of societal inequality, whether from a theoretical or policy based point of view, has some merit. The talk presented data on intra firm inequality for the UK. Both commercial and government data indicate that some measures of intra-firm inequality have increased substantially since big bang  (1986).  Since the financial crisis, a combination of equity based rewards for senior executive pay combined with the use of inflation indices or linkage to the National Living Wage have tended to increase inequality within firms on some measures.  

Podcast here.

Aaron Reeves 2

Inequalities Seminar: The Decline and Persistence of the Old Boy: Private Schools and Elite Recruitment 1897-2016

Speakers: Dr Aaron Reeves and Dr Sam Friedman

10 October, 12.30-1.45pm, TW2 9.05

This talk based on a paper with the same title drew upon 120 years of biographical data [N = 120,764] contained within Who’s Who - a unique catalogue of the British elite - to explore the changing relationship between elite schools and elite recruitment. The authors find that the propulsive power of Britain’s ‘public schools’ has diminished significantly over time. This is driven in part by the wane of military and religious elites, and the rise of women in the labour force. However, the most dramatic declines followed periods of educational reform that both increased access to, and standardised and differentiated the form of, the credentials needed to access elite trajectories. Notwithstanding this fall our analysis also underlines that these schools remain extraordinarily powerful channels of elite formation. Even today the alumni of the 9 Clarendon Schools are 94 times more likely to be members of the British elite than those who attended any other school. 

Video recording here.

Bev Skeggs

"You are being tracked, evaluated for digital trading and sold as you read this": an analysis of the making of digital inequalities

26th September 2017, Sheikh Zayed Theatre, 6.30-8pm

Speaker: Professor Beverley Skeggs 
Respondent: Dr Seeta Peña Gangadharan 
Chair: Professor Mike Savage

If our personal data is traded in milliseconds up to 70k times per day, what does this mean? Should we care? Are we aware? Does it matter? Is it possible to escape? Bev Skeggs drew on research that uses software to track the trackers (Facebook) and identified how a person's browser use is tracked and searched in detail for sources of potential value that can be sold to advertising companies. She argued that if we want to know how inequalities are being shaped in the present and future we need to understand the opaque mechanisms that operate through stealth and experiment with our personal disclosures.

Video available here.

Branko Milanovic

The Evolution of Global Inequalities: the impact on politics and the economy

5th July 2017, Sheikh Zayed Theatre, 6.30-8pm

Speaker: Professor Branko Milanovic
Chair: Professor Mike Savage

Branko Milanovic discussed the recent evolution in global inequality and focused on the political implications of the important changes in the global distribution of income.

Video recording available here.

Jee Kim

Inequalities: changing the terms of the debate

14th June, 2017, Sheikh Zayed Theatre, 6.30-8pm

Speakers: Jee Kim (Narratives Initiative), Katy Wright (Head of Global External Affairs at Oxfam), Professor Amartya Sen (Harvard)

Chair: Provessor Beverley Skeggs (LSE)

Given the power of those with a vested interest in maintaining some forms of inequality, can anything be done to change the terms of their debates? 

Video recording available here.

20170614_KU_LSE-III Conference_2170

III Annual Conference 2017: Challenging Inequalities, Developing a Global Response

14th June, 9.30-17.30, Sheikh Zayed Theatre

The annual conference of III and Atlantic Fellows programme for Social and Economic Equity debated topics including social mobility, health, racial and ethnic inequalities.

Videos of all sessions available here.

homeless_poverty_portugal_creditpedro_ribeiro_simoes_flickr

YSI Inequality Workshop

12-13 June

Interest in inequality has peaked over the past years and it has spurred a complex web of highly relevant research. During this interactive workship, this web was visualised and disentangled. Participants shared their own work, and also participated collectively in a project that begins to map the main theories, findings, questions and resources in inequality research. The joint work will eventually be published online and serve as a guide for those who are interested in studying and researching inequality. The student platform will be an extension of the YSI's existing online resources.

Nicholas-Stern-008

A Village, a Country and the Discipline: economic development in Palanpur over seven decades
An Eva Colorni memorial lecture

Speaker: Professor Nicholas Stern (IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government at LSE, President of the LSE India Observatory, President of the British Academy)
Discussant: Professor Amartya Sen (Thomas W Lamont Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University)
Chair: Professor Naila Kabeer (Professor of Gender and Development at the LSE Gender Institute and the Department of International Development)

7th June, 6.30-8pm, Old Theatre

Video recording available here.

Danny Dorling

The Equality Effect: improving life for everyone

Speaker: Professor Danny Dorling (Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography, Oxford University)
Chair: Dr Neil Lee (LSE Department of Geography and Environment)

Thursday 18th May, 6.30-8pm, The Venue, Saw Swee Hock Centre

Video recording here.

Joan Williams

Why did Trump win? Overcoming Class Cluelessness in America

Speaker: Professor Joan C. Williams (Professor of Law, UC Hastings Foundation and Chair and Director of the Center for WorkLife Law)
Chair: Dr Michael McQuarrie (LSE Sociology Department)

Wednesday 10th May, 6.30-8pm, Wolfson Theatre 

Watch the video recording here.

Naila Kabeer

Inequalities Seminar: Intersecting Inequalities and the Sustainable Development Goals: insights from Brazil

Speakers: Professor Naila Kabeer (LSE Gender Institute and Department of International Development) and Dr Ricardo Santos (UNU-WIDER) 

Tuesday 9th May, 12.30-1.45pm, TW2 9.05

Listen to podcast here.

Guy Standing

Basic Income: And How We Can Make It Happen

Speaker: Professor Guy Standing (SOAS)
Discussants: Professor the Lord Meghnad DESAI (Emeritus
Professor of Economics LSE)
Dr Malcolm Torry (Director of the Citizen’s
Income Trust and Visiting Senior Fellow, Social Policy Department, LSE)
Barb Jacobson (welfare advisor and Coordinator for Basic Income UK)
Chair: Professor Mike Savage (Co-Director of the III, LSE)

Monday 8th May, Old Theatre, Old Building, 6.30-8pm

Watch the video recording here.

Lisa Mckenzie

Inequalities Seminar: Post-Industrialisation in the East Midlands: ethnographic narratives from the communities that were thrown under the Brexit bus

Speaker: Dr Lisa Mckenzie (LSE Sociology)

Tuesday 2nd May, 12.30-1.45pm, TW2 9.05

Listen to podcast here.

Whither Europe map

Whither Europe? Historical Perspectives on 2017

Speakers: Professor Michael Cox, Dr Abby Innes, Professor Mike Savage and Professor Emeritus Alan Sked Chair: Dr Lucia Rubinelli

Thurs 27th April 2017, 6.30-8pm, Old Theatre

Can we Can we learn something about Europe’s future by turning to its past? Prominent scholars reflect on a year in history that has analogies with 2017.

Listen to podcast here.

Lutz Sager

Climate Change, Inequality and Social Policy seminar Would income redistribution result in higher aggregate emissions?

Speaker: Lutz Sager (Grantham Research Institute) 

Thursday 27th April 2017, 12-13.30, 32L 1.04

Part of the interdisciplinary seminar series Climate Change, Inequality and Social Policy. It is jointly hosted by the III, the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and CASE (Centre for Analyisis of Social Exclusion).

Joan Costa-i-Font

Inequalities Seminar: Health and Income Inequality Aversion: results from a UK survey experiment

Tuesday 25th April, 12.30-1.45pm TW2 9.05

Speaker: Dr Joan Costa-i-Font (LSE Social Policy and European Institute) 

Drawing on representative survey data from the UK, this talk  examined the following:
- Whether individuals' preferences for inequality are domain specific, and specifically between income and health.
- Whether attitudes conventionally measured in surveys are different from inequality preferences.
- Some of the determinants of inequality preferences such as risk aversion and personality.

Dena Freeman seminar

Inequalities Seminar: Dynamics of Democracy and Inequality in the context of Globalization

21st March, TW2 9.05, 12.30-1.45pm

Speaker: Dr Dena Freeman (Senior Visiting Fellow in the Department of Anthropology, LSE and an Associate of the III)

Listen to the podcast here.

Michele Lamont lecture

Getting Respect: responding to stigma and discrimination in the United States, Brazil and Israel

8 March, Old Theatre, 6.30-8pm

Speaker: Professor Michèle Lamont

This lecture was based on Michèle Lamont’s latest book, which contributes to the study of everyday racism and stigma management, the quest for recognition, and the comparative study of inequality and processes of cultural change.

Watch the video here.

Michele Lamont

Inequalities seminar: Addressing recognition gaps: destigmatization processes and the making of inequality

7 March, TW2 9.05, 12.30-1.45pm

Speaker: Professor Michèle Lamont (Harvard University)

This talk brought together three lines of research focused on destigmatization processes (as they pertain to African Americans, people with HIV-AIDs, and the obese); cultural processes feeding into inequality; and recognition gaps experienced by white working-class men in the United States and France, and stigmatized groups in Brazil, Israel, and the United States. From these studies, Michèle Lamont proposed an agenda for the empirical analysis of recognition, which she views as an essential but largely missing dimension to the study of inequality.

Listen to the podcast here.

Polly Vizard

Inequalities seminar: Older peoples' experiences of dignity and nutritional support during hospital stays

21 February 2017

Speaker: Dr Polly Vizard (LSE CASE)

Concern about older people's experiences of healthcare has moved up the political and public policy agendas in the wake of the Independent and Public Inquiries into Mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust. However, quantitative analysis of the available patient experience data remains limited and the statistical evidence base on inequalities even more so. In this talk, Dr Polly Vizard presented findings from a new study that provides in-depth nationally representative quantitative evidence on older people’s experiences of poor and inconsistent standards of treatment with dignity and respect, and support with eating, during hospital stays using the Adult Inpatient Survey. The study highlights how older age interacts with gender and disability as a driver of inpatient experience, considers the role of socio-economic disadvantage, and makes specific recommendations on how to build inequalities analysis into national frameworks for healthcare monitoring, inspection and regulation.

Podcast available here.

Climate Change Image

The Health Co-benefits of the Low Carbon Economy

16 February 2017

Speakers: Professor Andy Haines, Alison Smith and Ruth Mayne

Part of the interdisciplinary seminar series Climate Change, Inequality and Social Policy. It is jointly hosted by the III, the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and CASE (Centre for Analyisis of Social Exclusion).

BSA Seminar

BSA Seminar: Design and 'the Social': Mapping new Approaches to Inequality in Design

7 February 2017

Keynote Speaker: Dr Lucy Kimbell (Director of the Innovations Insights Hub, University of the Arts london) 

With contributions from: Prof Mike Savage (Co-Director of the III) and Dr Adam Kaasa (Director of Theatrum Mundi)

For a post-event summary of the seminar, see here.

Avner Offer cropped

The Piketty Opportunity

26 January 2017

Speakers: Patricia Hudson (Emeritus Professor Cardiff University), Avner Offer (Chichele Professor of Economic History, Oxford University) and Keith Tribe (Independent Scholar)

Chair: Professor Mike Savage

This event marked the publication of The Contradictions of Capital in the Twenty-First Century, a volume of essays that builds upon the renewed interest in wealth and inequality stimulated by the work of Thomas Piketty. Editors and authors Patricia Hudson, Avner Offer and Keith Tribe joined with associates of the International Inequalities Institute to discuss the analysis of inequality in an international context.

Watch the video recording here.

Asma Jahangir 2

Religious Intolerance and its Impact on Democracy

STICERD Amartya Sen Lecture co-hosted by the International Inequalities Institute

17 January 2017

Speaker: Asma Jilani Jahangir
Discussant: Professor Amartya Sen (Harvard University)
Chair: Professor Chetan Bhatt (LSE Human Rights Centre and Sociology Department)

Asma Jilani Jahangir is a Pakistani human rights lawyer and activist who co-founded and chaired the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan. Her talk focused on how government failure to address the questions of religious intolerance and free expression dilutes the principles of democracy, equality and justice, particularly for women and religious minorities.

Watch the video recording here.

Paul Segal seminar

Inequalities Seminar: Who are the Global Top 1%?

17 January 2017

Speaker: Dr Paul Segal (Senior Lecturer in Economics at Kings College London, Visiting Fellow at the III)

This seminar presented findings from the paper with the same title, representing the first in-depth analysis of the changing composition of the global distribution.

Watch the video recording here.

Kathleen Thelen 1

Social Solidarity in the "Knowledge Economy"

12 January 2017

Speaker: Professor Kathleen Thelen (MIT)
Discussant: Dr Waltraud Schelkle (LSE European Institute)
Chair: Professor David Soskice (LSE Government Department)

This lecture examined cross-nationally divergent responses to the challenges posed by the transition to the "knowledge economy" and explores the role of the state in sustaining growth, employment, and social solidarity in the contemporary period.

2016

Robert Frank Success and Luck

Success and Luck: good fortune and the myth of meritocracy

7 Dec 2016

Speaker: Prof Robert H. Frank (Cornell University)
Discussants: Prof Nicola Lacey (LSE) and Rt Hon Ed Miliband MP
Chair: Prof John Hills (LSE)

Professor Robert Frank discussed the role luck plays in economic success. 

Watch the video recording here.

Credit Suisse 3

Credit Suisse Global Wealth Report 2016

23 November 2016

Speaker:  Anthony Shorrocks (Global Economic Perspectives; World Institute of Development Economics Research)
Discussants: Dr Abigail McKnight (LSE) and Deborah Hardoon (Oxfam)
Chair: Prof John Hills (LSE)

To mark the publication of the Global Wealth Report 2016, Tony Shorrocks explained the basis of Credit Suisse data and summarised the current evidence on the level, distribution and trends of household wealth in all regions and countries of the world since 2000.

Watch video recording here

poverty map charles booth

Charles Booth Centenary Lectures

3 November 2016

Speakers: Mary Morgan, Alan Manning, Stephen Machin, Fran Tonkiss, Suzi Hall, Anne Power, Emily Grundy, Tim Newburn and John Hills

This event, which coincided with the LSE Research Festival 2016, was part of a wider LSE celebration of pioneering social scientist Charles Booth, who died in 1916, and whose original survey into life and labour in London is held in the LSE Library.

Booth's investigation of poverty in London provides a key example both of the creative development of social science and of the ways in which research may be used to have a positive impact on society. The event brought together a group of scholars from a range of disciplines to explore the substance of Booth's ideas as well as his broader legacy for the social sciences and for contemporary social analysis.

Watch video recordings here.

David stasavage 16 9 cropped

Taxing the Rich: A History of Fiscal Fairness in the US and Europe

12 October 2016

Speaker: Professor David Stasavage
Chair: Professor David Soskice

In today's social climate of growing inequality, why are there not greater efforts to tax the rich? David Stasavage asks when and why countries tax their wealthiest citizens.

Watch video recording here

APPAM Header

2016 APPAM Interantional Conference

13-14 June 2016

The Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management 2016 conference was held at the International Inequalities Institute on June 13th & 14th 2016.

This international conference gathered policy researchers and analysts from around the globe to share the latest research and knowledge on the pressing challenge on inequality.

More details and video recording here.

Challenging Inequalities 1

Challenging Inequalities

25 May 2016

Speakers: Craig Calhoun, Shami Chakrabarti, Duncan Green and Phumeza Mlungwana

This public lecture followed the III Annual Conference 2016 and debated different approaches to challenging inequality across the globe.

Listen to podcast here.

III Annual Conference Session 2

III Annual Conference 2016

25 May 2016

Speakers: Kimberlé Crenshaw, Nicola Lacey, Kim Weeden, Stephen Jenkins, Facundo Alvaredo, Katharina Hecht, Satanuka Roy, Rebecca Simson, Thomas Piketty, Murray Leibbrandt, Catherine Boone, John Hills, Deborah Hargreaves, David Soskice

An international gathering to discuss inequality held at Friends House, London.

Watch video recordings here.

Evicted 1

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

21 March 2016

MacArthur 'Genius' award winning ethnographer Matthew Desmond speaks about his investigation into the low-income rental market and eviction in privately owned housing, and argues it is a cause, not just a symptom, of poverty.

Podcast available here.

2015

P1020786

Standing Out: Transgender Candidates Around the World

4 November 2015

Standing Out is the first report to address the phenomenon of transgender people running for office around the world. Read the report.

At this event, held at the LSE on 4th November 2015, transgender candidates from around the world shared their experience of politics and elections, and academics discussed how increased visibility increases acceptance.

Speakers:

  • Bemz Benedito is a founding member and chairperson for the Ang Ladlad Party in the Philippines, the first party in the world dedicated solely to advancing justice and human rights for LGBT members of society.
  • Logan Casey is a doctoral candidate in the University of Michigan's Department of Political Science.
  • Andrew Reynolds is Director of the LGBTQ Representation and Rights Research Initiative and a Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Mike Savage social class

Social Class in the 21st Century

2 November 2015

Speakers: Mike Savage, Niall Cunningham, Fiona Devine, Sam Friedman, Daniel Laurison, Lisa McKenzie, Andrew Mile, Helene Snee, Paul Wakeling

Social class has re-emerged as a topic of enormous scholarly and public attention. Mike Savage and the team of sociologists responsible for the Great British Class Survey  discussed their findings and proposed a new way of thinking about social class in Britain today, arguing that while the class war was over the new politics of class are only just beginning.

Watch video recording here.

Jane Waldfogel

Too Many Children Left Behind: the US achievement gap in comparative perspective

21 October 2015

Speaker: Jane Waldfogel
Discussant: Dr Lee Elliot Major

Jane Waldfogel of Columbia University explains her work as part of a team of social scientists who compared educational outcomes and their link to family socio-economic status across the English speaking world.

Video recording available here.

Luna elite property

Elite and Urban Dynamics: New Perspectives Conference

22 July 2015

Supported by the ESRC as part of their Alpha Territory project researching London's 'super-rich' Neighbourhoods.

A one-day seminar was organised by Rowland Atkinson (University of Sheffield), Roger Burrows (Goldsmiths) and Mike Savage (LSE), taking place at LSE on Wednesday 22nd July 2015 in three sessions:

1. The resurgence of elite sociology

  • Elites Without Hierarchies: Intermediaries, 'Agency' and the Super-rich
    Will Davies
  • Life in the Alpha Territory, results from a two-year study
    Rowland Atkinson and Roger Burrows, Luna Glucksberg, Caroline Knowles and David Rhodes
  • Elites in the Great British Class Survey
    Daniel Laurison and Sam Friedman
  • Getting Ahead? Meritocratic Elites and the Gendered Body in the Age of Egg Freezing and Wearables
    Charis Thompson

2. Urbanism and Wealth

  • London and Hong Kong
    Hang Kei Ho
  • A New City for Croesus
    Simon Parker, Rowland Atkinson and Roger Burrows
  • Conflicts of Taste and Values in an Elite London Suburb
    Richard Webber - View Presentation Slides

3. New agendas and Future Research

  • Elite Research and the LSE International Inequalities Institute
    John Hills, Tania Burchardt and others.
  • The Gentrification of Gentrification
    Luna Glucksberg, Rowland Atkinson, Tim Butler and Dave Rhodes
  • The Elite London Vortex
    Niall Cunningham and Mike Savage - View Presentation Slides
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The Great Divide

19 May 2015

Speaker: Joseph Stiglitz

Chair: John Hills

Joseph Stiglitz talked about his new book, The Great Divide, expanding on the diagnosis he offered in The Price of Inequality, and suggesting ways to counter this growing problem.

Watch video recording here.

21st century conf session 4

Inequality in the 21st Century

11 May 2015

Speakers: Stuart Corbridge, David Soskice, Wendy Carlin, Bob Rowthorn, Diane Perrons, Stephanie Seguino, Lisa McKenzie, Naila Kabeer, Thomas Piketty Laura Bear, Gareth Jones, Mike Savage, Julia Black, John Hills and Tony Atkinson

A day long conference with Thomas Piketty, Centenial Professor at the III whose Capital in the Twenty-First Century has been of global significance in shaping debates about inequality. The conference marked the official launch of the III.

Watch video recording here.

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Inequality: what can be done?

Joint event with Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE)

Speaker: Tony Atkinson
Discussants: Tom Clark and Baroness Lister
Chair: Nicholas Stern

Professor Sir Tony Atkinson argues that present levels of inequality are not inevitable and that there are concrete measures to be taken to tackle inequality.

Podcast available here.