Home > IDEAS > Events > Pre-2005 Cold War Studies Centre Events

 

Pre-2005 Cold War Studies Centre Events

2004 Cold War Studies Centre Events

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar 
3 February 2004
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE
Michael Lumbers (LSE)
The Irony of Vietnam: the Johnson administration's tentative bridge-building to China, 1965-66

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar 
17 February 2004
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE
Garret Martin (International History, LSE):
'Visionnaire Ou Mercenaire'? France and the Western World, 1963-1965

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar 
26 February 2004
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE
Professor Hope Harrison (George Washington University)
Driving the Soviets Up the Wall: Soviet-East German Relations, 1953-1961

Summer Seminar in Cold War History
1-7 August 2004,
Cambridge University
Sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, New York
arne_mick_cropThis was the second annual week-long seminar, a result of cooperation between the CWSC and the Gilder-Lehrman Institute from New York. It followed in the footsteps of the highly successful seminar organised in 2003. American High school history teachers, together with their Russian colleagues, attended lectures on Cold War history by Professor OA Westad, Professor Michael Cox and Dr Svetozar Rajak, all from the CWSC, Dr Sophie Quinn-Judge, and by Anita Seth, a Yale University graduate student. Beside having the chance to attend lectures by Cold War specialist and increase their knowledge of the Cold War, American and Russian teachers had a rare opportunity to exchange experiences in teaching the subject of the Cold War and address the issue of existing differences in the perceptions and experiences of the Cold War in Russia and the United States. In addition, they had a chance to acquaint themselves with increased accessibility of the Cold War scholarship through electronic media. This highly acclaimed series will be continued in future.
Programme of lectures:

  • The Origins of the Cold War: Historians' Perspectives, by Professor Westad
  • The Breakdown of the Grand Alliance, 1945-49, by Professor Westad
  • Cold War in the Balkans, by Dr Rajak
  • Using Video Sources in Teaching Cold War History, by Anita Seth
  • The Korean War, by Professor Westad
  • Cold War History website demonstration by Dr Rajak and Professor Westad
  • Eastern Europe under Communism, by Dr Rajak
  • The Cuban Missile Crisis, by Professor Westad
  • The Vietnam War, by Dr Quinn-Judge
  • The Cold War in the Third World, by Professor Westad
  • Social Life in the Cold War, by Anita Seth
  • The Rise and Fall of Détente, by Professor Westad
  • From the Cold War to the War on Terror, by Professor Cox
  • Video and Discussion: How the Cold War Ended

Conference: Ostpolitik - Westpolitik
22-24 September 2004
Pembroke College, Oxford

pembroke_collegeThe was the second of three planned conferences run under the auspices of the 'De-centering the Cold War programme'. Its purpose was to begin breaking down what has always appeared a rather artificial divorce in the historiography between the history of the cold war and the history of European integration. The two processes ran simultaneously and involved many of the same actors, both in terms of states and individuals, and it therefore seemed improbable that they could ever have developed entirely in isolation one from the other. The conference brought together a small, but high calibre group of international specialists in both fields, to discuss the issue for two and half days. The papers, although very high quality, were deliberately kept short (abstracts appear below), allowing the maximum possible time for discussion. This amply confirmed that there were indeed inter-linkages, but that these links were neither as straight forward as the conference organisers had perhaps expected, nor constant over the period under review. The gap in different national attitudes also emerged very clearly. And the extent to which the highest level politicians have to consider inter-linkages and interconnections that both their more junior counterparts and their civil servants are able to ignore was repeatedly emphasised. The organisers are therefore confident that the volume that it is hoped will emerge from the conference will make a valuable to addition to the historiography of both the cold war in Europe and that of the integration process.
This event was part of the Decentering the Cold War Programme.
Conference papers included:

  • Georges Henri Soutou (Paris): The Linkage Between European Integration And Detente: De Gaulle's And Pompidou's Contrasting Approaches (1965-1973).
  • Garret Martin (LSE): 'Grandeur et Dépendances': The Dilemmas of Gaullist Foreign Policy, September 1967-April 1968.
  • Wilfried Loth (Essen): Détente and European Integration in the policies of Willy Brandt and Georges Pompidou.
  • James Ellison (London): Anglo-American relations, the future of the Atlantic Alliance and detente, 1966-69.
  • Helen Parr (Keele): Anglo-French relations, detente and Britain's second application for membership of the EEC, 1966-1967.
  • Jan van der Harst (Groningen): The Netherlands, the Gaullist challenge and the evolving Cold War, 1966-1973.
  • Piers Ludlow (LSE): An Insulated Community? The Community Institutions and the Cold War, 1965-1970.
  • Jussi Hanhimaki (Geneva): The Cold War and European Integration - the US view-point.
  • Andreas Wilkens (Metz): New Ostpolitik and European Integration: Concepts and Policies in the Brandt Era.
  • Conclusions

CWSC Public Lecture
12 October 2004, 6:30 pm
Old theatre, Old Building, LSE

Why the Bush Doctrine Crashed and Burned in Iraq|
Speaker: Professor John Mearsheimer (University of Chicago)
The first in a series of lectures marking the launch of LSE’s new global Centre for the Study of the Cold War. The series will examine the links between the most important event in the second half of the 20th century, the Cold War, and the defining conflict of the new millennium, the war on terror. John Mearsheimer is the R Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science and co-director of the Program on International Security Policy at the University of Chicago.

CWSC Public Lecture
20 October 2004, 6:30 pm
Old theatre, Old Building, LSE

American Right or Wrong? American Nationalism from the War on Communism to the War on Terror|
Speaker: Dr Anatol Lieven (Senior Fellow, Carnegie Institute, Washington DC)


CWSC Public Lecture and Book Launch
2 November, 2004, 6.30 pm
Old theatre, Old Building, LSE

The Flawed Architect: Henry Kissinger and American Foreign Policy|
Speaker: Professor Jussi Hanhimaki (Geneva)

CWSC Public Lecture
11 November 2004, 6:30 pm
Old theatre, Old Building, LSE
Rethinking the Origins of September 11: Afghanistan, Islam, and the Collapse of the Soviet Empire|
Speaker: Professor Fred Halliday (Department of International Relations, LSE)

CWSC Public Lecture
17 November 2004, 6:30 pm
Old theatre, Old Building, LSE

World Orders in Chaos: From the End of the Cold War to the War on Terror|
Speaker: Professor Richard Ned Lebow (Dartmouth College, USA)

Official Opening of the Centre
8 December, 2004
LSE

On Wednesday 8 December 2004 the Cold War Studies Centre hosted a reception to mark its official opening. Representatives of the diplomatic corps in London, government officials, representatives of other British academic institutions, public figures, friends and associates of the Centre and LSE staff helped celebrate this special occasion with us. A lecture by Prof. G John Ikenberry of Princeton University followed the formal reception.  
 

CWSC Official Opening Public Lecture
8 December 2004, 6:30 pm
Old theatre, Old Building, LSE
From Containment to Pre-Emption: American Grand Strategies Revisited|
Speaker: Professor G. John Ikenberry (Princeton University, USA)
Part of a series of lectures marking the launch of LSE’s new global Centre for the Study of the Cold War, this lecture will explore the complex links between the most important event of the second half of the 20th century, the Cold War, and the defining conflict of the new millennium, the war on terror. G John Ikenberry was Peter F Krogh Professor of Geopolitics and Global Justice at Georgetown University.

2003 Cold War Studies Centre Events

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar
21 January 2003
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE
Dr Steve Casey, International History, LSE: 
Selling NSC-68: American public opinion, mobilisation and the Korean War, 1950-51

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar
4 February 2003
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE
Professor James Hershberg, George Washington University: 
The Hottest Spot South of Havana: JFK, Brazil, and the Cuban Missile Crisis

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar
25 February 2003
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE
Dr Arne Hofmann, International History, LSE: 
Willy Brandt, John F Kennedy, the Berlin Wall and the Origins of Ostpolitik

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar
1 March 2003
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE
Dr Valur Ingimundarson, University of Iceland: 
The Politics of Race and Gender in US-Icelandic Relations: the ban on the stationing of black troops in Iceland in the 1950s and 1960s

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar 
4 March 2003
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE
Dr Marilena Gala, University of Florence: 
Arms Control and US-West European Relations in the 1960s

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar
6 May 2003
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE

Dr Svetozar Rajak, International History, LSE: 
The Tito-Khrushchev Rivalry and the Evolving Eastern European Crisis in 1956

Conference: Tripolar Diplomacy and the Third Indochina Conflict
13-16 May 2003
LSE

Scholars from Vietnam, China, Russia, France, the United States and Britain gathered at a closed three-day conference from 13-16 May 2003 to discuss the international events leading to the Third Indochina Conflict. Secluded in a former royal residence in Windsor Great Park, the participants engaged in intense discussions of all angles of the conflict, from the US-Chinese rapprochement to the Vietnamese occupation of Cambodia and its aftermath. The views of veteran Vietnamese diplomat Luu Doan Huynh and Chinese historian Chen Jian, who was a student in China at the time of this conflict, brought a level of immediacy to the meeting which is often missing in scholarly encounters. At the same time, the participation of two young PhD students, Lien-Hang Nguyen and Cecile Menetrey-Monchau, who shared their research on US and Vietnamese policy, forced the participants to keep their focus on the latest available documentation.
This event was part of the Decentering the Cold War Programme.
Conference papers included:

  • Lien-Hang Nguyen, Yale University: The Roots of War: Sino-Vietnamese relations in the latter half of the Second Indochina War
  • Chen Jian, University of Virginia: China, the Vietnam War, and the Sino-American rapprochement: 1968-1973
  • Luu Doan Huynh, Institute for International Relations, Hanoi (retired): The Paris Peace Agreement and the Vietnamese Vision of the Future
  • Cecile Menetrey-Monchau, Cambridge University: The Changing US Strategy in Indochina
  • Christopher Goscha, Institut d'Asie Orientale, University de Lyon II: Between Indochina and Southeast Asia: The Third Indochinese War and the meltdown of Asian internationalism
  • Nguyen Vu Tung, Institute for International Relations, Hanoi: The Paris Peace Agreement and Vietnam-Asian Relations (1972-1977)
  • Tatiana Zakaurtseva, Diplomatic Academy, Moscow: Moscow and Tripolar Diplomacy in Asia: 1978
  • Ngo Vinh Long, University of Maine: The Socialization of South Vietnam
  • Ben Kiernan,Yale University: External and Indigenous Sources of Khmer Rouge Ideology
  • Sophie Quinn-Judge, LSE: Vietnam's Cambodia Decade: 1979-1989
  • O Arne Westad, LSE: Conclusion: was the Third Indochina Conflict inevitable?

Summer Seminar in Cold War History
cambridge_picture_213-19 July 2003
Cambridge University
Co-sponsored by the Gilder-Lehrman Institute of American History in New York City and the LSE Decentering the Cold War Programme.This week-long seminar was a unique exercise in bridge-building: an effort to bridge the gap between how Cold War history is understood and taught in schools in Russia and the United States. Western teachers, together with seven of their Russian colleagues, attended lectures on recent Cold War history by Professor Westad and three other LSE scholars connected with the Cold War Studies Programme, and by Anita Seth, a Yale University graduate student. At the same time they learned from each other during the discussions following lectures. The teachers also had time to work with original documents and write commentaries to be used in classroom teaching. This first effort at staging a joint US-Russian seminar will be followed by more seminars on this pattern in years to come. This event was part of the Decentering the Cold War Programme.
Programme of Lectures:

  • The Origins of the Cold War: historians' perspectives, by Professor Westad
  • The Breakdown of the Grand Alliance, 1945-49, by Professor Westad
  • The Origins of the Cold War in Asia, 1945-1949, by Dr Quinn-Judge
  • Using Video Sources in Teaching Cold War History, by Anita Seth
  • The Korean War, by Professor Westad
  • Cold War History website demonstration by Sergey Radchenko and Professor Westad
  • The Sino-Soviet Split, by Sergey Radchenko
  • The Cuban Missile Crisis, by Professor Westad
  • The Vietnam War, by Dr Quinn-Judge
  • The Cold War in the Third World, by Professor Westad
  • Social Life in the Cold War, by Anita Seth
  • The Rise and Fall of Détente, by Professor Westad
  • The Cold War and European Integration, by Dr Ludlow
  • Video and discussion: The End of the Cold War

International Conference: 
Great Powers and Small Countries in the Cold War, 1945-1955: The Case of Yugoslavia
3-4 November 2003
Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro
Together with the Faculty of History, University of Belgrade and the National Archives of Serbia and Montenegro, Yugoslavia Initiative (YI) co-organised a conference in Belgrade entitled Great Powers and Small Countries in the Cold War, 1945-1955: the case study of Yugoslavia. The conference was the first such gathering on the Cold War topic in Belgrade for almost a decade. Papers were presented by more than 25 of the most prominent Serbian and Montenegrin historians, including Professor Lj Dimic, Dr Dj Stankovic, Dr Dj Borozan, Dr D Bogetic, Dr Dj Tripkovic, M Perisic and others, together with Belgrade University PhD students. Contributions from abroad were made by Professor Odd Arne Westad and Dr Svetozar Rajak, from LSE, and Professor James Hershberg from George Washington University. The aim of the conference was to promote and encourage the Cold War scholarship in Serbia and Montenegro. In addition, presentations were made by representatives of all major archives and historical institutes in Belgrade. The ensuing debate provided valuable contributions to the making of the new archival legislation and improved accessibility to the archives of Serbia and Montenegro.

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar 
3 December 2003
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE
Professor Vladimir Shubin (Moscow):
The Soviet Union, Southern Africa and the end of the Cold War
This event was part of the Decentering the Cold War Programme.

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar 
9 December 2003
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE

Alex Wieland (LSE):
At odds in Arabia: Anglo-American relations and the Yemeni revolution, September 1962 - February 1963

2002 Cold War Studies Centre Events

CWSC Public Lecture
7 May 2002
Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE
US Foreign and Defence Policy for the 21st Century|
Speaker: Robert S. McNamara
Robert McNamara, US Secretary of Defense under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, visited LSE to deliver a public lecture and present two seminars sponsored by the Cold War Studies Programme, on 7 May 2002. He was accompanied by Professor Robert Brigham of the Faculty of History at Vassar College, one of the co-authors of Mr McNamara's book, Argument Without End. Their seminars, case studies in critical oral history, dealt with the topics The Cuba Missile Crisis and The Escalation of the Vietnam War. The text of Mr McNamara's lecture on US Foreign and Defense Policy for the 21st Century is available below as a PDF file. This event was part of the Decentering the Cold War Programme.

CWSC Visiting Researcher
4 August-27 September 2002
Professor Ljubodrag Dimic
Together with the Cold War International History Project in Washington DC, Yugoslavia Initiative (YI) invited Professor Ljubodrag Dimic of the University of Belgrade History Faculty to London. Professor Dimic is the foremost Yugoslav historian of Serbia and Montenegro and as such coordinates the Belgrade side of the YI programme. He is also the head of the team of historians of the Presidential Commission for Truth and Reconciliation. During his visit, Professor Dimic worked at LSE and in the British National Archives. Among other things, he was able to acquaint himself with the most recent international Cold War scholarship and to introduce the existing Cold War historiography of Serbia and Montenegro to scholars in London. He also attended the induction week at the British National Archives| and familiarised himself with the syllabus and teaching methods of the International History Department at LSE.

Induction Week at the British National Archive
21-29 September 2002
National Archive, Kew, London
With funding support from the Cold War International History Project of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC and the cooperation of the British National Archives in London, the Yugoslavia Initiative (YI) Programme brought the Deputy Director of the National Archives of Serbia and Montenegro, Mr Miladin Milosevic, together with an archivist, Mr Sasa Ilic, to a one-week induction seminar at the British National Archives, at Kew, London.
During the week-long induction programme, every aspect of the functioning of a modern archive was introduced to the Yugoslav archivists. They were informed in detail of conservationist techniques, the functioning of the reading rooms, repositories and storage, document transfer procedures, document appraisal and selection, cataloguing, electronic access to archives and digitisation, educational activities, legislative framework, and many other aspects.

CWSC Public Lecture
31 October 2002, 4.15 pm
Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE
The Burden of Historical Perception and the Way Forward for Yugoslavia and the Balkans|
Speaker: Mr. Goran Svilanovic, the Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs (Serbia and Montenegro)
Chair: Dr Odd Arne Westad, LSE
Mr. Goran Svilanovic was an Assistant Professor at the Belgrade Law School, until his removal in 1998 for resistance to the Milosevic government’s repressive Law on the Universities. He served as spokesman of the Civic Alliance of Serbia from 1997 and in 1999 was elected its Chairman.
He spoke on the Balkan states' historical opportunity to overcome their heritage of conflict. For the first time in their history, all states in the region have democratically elected governments and a common strategic goal - to join the European Union. But Yugoslavia is simultaneously trying to overcome problems of transition, problems that are a result of the change of political and economic systems, of the policies of Milosevic's regime, of wars, and of international sanctions. This lecture is free and open to all but a ticket is required.

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar
5 November 2002
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE
Dr Helen Parr, International History, LSE: 
Dancing on an Obstinate Old Man's Grave: Wilson, DeGaulle and the place of the EEC in Britain's foreign policy, 1964-1967

Cold War Studies Centre Seminar
26 November 2002
CWSC Seminar Room, LSE
Sergey Radchenko, PhD student, International History, LSE: 
Splitting Asia: Beijing and Moscow in search of allies
 

Share:Facebook|Twitter|LinkedIn|