Research 2019

Call For Research Project Proposals 2019

In 2018 the Hellenic Observatory launched an exciting research initiative to further fulfil and develop its mission and study of contemporary Greece and Cyprus in the field of the social sciences. The programme became possible due to new funding granted for the specific purpose of furthering the Hellenic Observatory’s research agenda. The Hellenic Observatory would like to acknowledge grateful and sincere thanks to the A.C. Laskaridis Charitable Foundation (ACLCF) and Dr Vassili G. Apostolopoulos for the provision of funding for this purpose. 

 

Research Themes & Level of Awards

The LSE’s Hellenic Observatory invited applications from researchers to conduct time-sensitive and globally competitive policy relevant research on contemporary Greece and/or Cyprus.

1. Researchers were invited to submit a research proposal on the following theme for an award up to £20,000. One Project has been selected (1 award) and it will run for a maximum of 24 months.

 

Crisis and entrepreneurship in Greece

£20,000 grant - project wil run for a maximum 24 months (1 award)

New firms and start-ups are important determinants to job creation, productivity, social mobility and economic growth. Moreover, firm entry and exit determine the (re)allocation of resources between sectors and regions. However, little is known regarding firm-creation and entrepreneurship in Greece, especially in light of the recent economic crisis. Moreover, there is scarcity of evidence regarding the impact of institutions in channeling the supply of entrepreneurial activity, both in terms of level and type, as well as regarding a possibly bidirectional interplay between institutions and various types of entrepreneurs. A similar scarcity of evidence exists with regard to questions of finance, e.g. liquidity constraints, new funding tools etc. To address this research gap, we invite proposals on the broad topic of Crisis and Entrepreneurship in Greece that can touch upon any aspect along the lines of the above parameters. This would include, for instance, proposals for the analysis of the profiles of newly created firms and/or their creators and workforce; research examining the role of entrepreneurship for various indicators of economic activity (employment, wages, growth, innovation, export orientation, foreign direct investment and others) as well as for human capital in the country (skills and training, over-education, brain-gain, etc.); research on the link between specific institutional constraints (employment relations, quality of government, judiciary, and others) and the level and type of entrepreneurial supply in the country (e.g., distinguishing among self-employed, entrepreneurs, start-ups, etc.); research on financial and other constraints to entrepreneurial activity; and others. Successful proposals should be able to demonstrate sufficient knowledge on their proposed field of study (including relevant publications in international journals), relevant methodological competences (qualitative and/or quantitative), and robust understanding of the Greek economy and its institutional setting.

2. Researchers were invited to submit a research proposal on the following theme for an award of up to £8,000.  One Project has been selected (1 award) and it will run for a maximum of 12 months.

Evaluating the effects of bail-out reforms in Greece

£8,000 grant - project will run for a maximum 12 months (1 award)

After several years of facing a severe economic crisis, one of the most prolonged debates in Greece is about the effectiveness and impact of structural reforms regarding markets, institutions and the functioning of public services.The projects envisaged under this Call will explore either:

1. Why certain structural reform(s) identified within the fiscal consolidation programme have not been (fully) implemented: identifying the impediments and constraints within the reform/implementation process; or,

2.The causal impacts of selected reform(s) on Greece: an evaluation of their effects to date.

The scope of the research may be a single or a comparative case study within Greece and/or by reference to another EU member state.  Applications should identify an appropriate methodology and likely sources/data and they are expected to draw policy-relevant recommendations based on their evidence. Successful proposals should be able to demonstrate sufficient knowledge on their suggested field of study (including relevant publications in international journals), relevant methodological competences (qualitative and/or quantitative), and robust understanding of the Greek economy and its institutional setting.


3. Researchers were invited to submit a research proposal on the following theme for an award of up to £8,000.  One Project has been selected (1 award) and it will run for a maximum of 12 months.

Speed of justice in Greece: Obstacles, implications and policy recommendations

£8,000 grant - project will run for a maximum 12 months (1 award)

The slow pace of justice has been highlighted as a major obstacle to investment, both domestic and foreign, efficient resource allocation, economic growth and social welfare. It leads to a deterioration in standards and quality of life and reduces trust in the state and institutions. Recent evidence gathered by international organizations suggests that the situation has become aggravated in recent years.  Improvements in the area of justice point to acceleration of growth and the improvement of everyday lives of citizens. Therefore, there is a need for in depth research examining the causes of the slow pace in justice and specific policy recommendations to overcome obstacles. The identification of best practices from other countries that may more readily fit the Greek case are particularly welcome. Successful proposals should demonstrate a combined knowledge of law, public administration and/or organization theory. The use of qualitative and/or quantitative data-based evidence to depict past and current trends regarding the distribution of justice in Greece as well as to support their arguments is also strongly encouraged.

 

Selection Process 

Proposals were selected by the Hellenic Observatory and members of the Research Advisory Group according to the following criteria:

  • Originality, significance, rigour and impact of the research
  • Evidence that the individuals involved have the capacity to execute the proposed project and deliver on stated outcomes
  • Contribution towards policy-relevant challenges facing Greece and/or Cyprus
  • Value for money
  • Compatibility of the research with the broader work of the Hellenic Observatory

The Hellenic Observatory and the Research Advisory Group are solely responsible for approving the eligibility of applications and reserved the right to request additional information from the applicants. In all cases, the decisions of the Hellenic Observatory and the Research Advisory Group are final. 

Deliverables

The successful researcher / research team is required to provide:

  • Policy Brief: a Policy Brief of 2,000 words (after 6 months where project run is 12 months and after 12 months where project run is 24 months
  • Final Research Note: a Final Research Note of up to 10,000 words at the end of the project
  • Other: Scholarly publications and publications in other outlets, stemming from the research project will be a significant criterion for the evaluation of the applications submitted.

The researcher / or research team will be obliged to give full acknowledgement to the Hellenic Observatory in all publicity and outputs related to the project, copies of which should be sent to the Hellenic Observatory. The Hellenic Observatory also retains the right to publicise a summary of the results, with full acknowledgement to the authors of the research, on its website and in its other publicity outlets.