All pages with keywords: carbon emissions

Treasury freeze of Carbon Price Support Rate could ‘endanger’ UK 2030 emissions targets – response to Autumn Budget announcement

Press release 22 November, 2017

The decision by the UK Treasury to continue its indefinite freeze of the Carbon Price Support Rate means the price is likely to be too weak to create enough shift from gas-fired power stations to low-carbon sources, such as renewables and nuclear – says Bob Ward, Policy and Communications Director at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change. read more »


Multiple benefits from climate change mitigation: assessing the evidence

Multiple benefits from climate change mitigation: assessing the evidence

a policy report by Kirk Hamilton, Milan Brahmbhatt, Jiemei Liu 3 November, 2017

This report assesses what is known about potential co-benefits across multiple domains: environmental, economy-wide, and sector-specific. It then reports on empirical results on co-benefits, in particular the application of integrated assessment models (IAMs) to simulate co-benefits over the course of the century. read more »


Response to UN Emissions Gap report

Press release 31 October, 2017

Responding to the publication of the UN Emissions Gap report today (31 October 2017) Bob Ward, policy and communications director at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the … read more »


CISPS | Would income redistribution result in higher aggregate emissions?

CISPS | Would income redistribution result in higher aggregate emissions?

Climate Change, Inequality & Social Policy Seminar Lutz Sager 27 Apr 2017

Would income redistribution result in higher aggregate emissions? Lutz Sager (Grantham Research Institute, LSE) Discussants: Professor Angela Druckman (Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity, University of Surrey) Ian Gough, … read more »


CISPS | Lucas Chancel ‘Carbon and Inequality: from Measurement to Policy’

Climate Change, Inequality & Social Policy Seminar 1 Dec 2016

This seminar will present recent trends in economic inequality and individual carbon emissions at the international and national levels. It will also seek to identify the conditions under which carbon mitigation measures can be implemented with positive social impacts. read more »


Clarification: China’s carbon dioxide emissions

Clarification: China’s carbon dioxide emissions

a commentary by Bob Ward 9 March, 2016

On 4 March 2016, the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and the ESRC Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy at the London School of Economics … read more »


China’s changing economy: implications for its carbon dioxide emissions

a research article by Fergus Green, Nicholas Stern 7 March, 2016

China is undergoing another major structural transformation. It is moving towards a new development model, focused on achieving better quality growth that is more sustainable and inclusive. It … read more »


China’s “new normal”: structural change, better growth, and peak emissions

a policy report by Fergus Green, Nicholas Stern 8 June, 2015

Study shows that China has entered a new phase of economic development – continuing to promote economic growth while driving down its GHG emissions. read more »


Endogenous growth, convexity of damages and climate risk: how Nordhaus’ framework supports deep cuts in carbon emissions

Endogenous growth, convexity of damages and climate risk: how Nordhaus’ framework supports deep cuts in carbon emissions

a research article by Simon Dietz, Nicholas Stern 23 March, 2015

‘To slow or not to slow’ (Nordhaus, 1991) was the first economic appraisal of greenhouse gas emissions abatement and founded a large literature on a topic of worldwide importance. We offer our assessment of the original article and trace its legacy, in particular Nordhaus’s later series of ‘DICE’ models. From this work, many have drawn the conclusion that an efficient global emissions abatement policy comprises modest and modestly increasing controls. We use DICE itself to provide an initial illustration that, if the analysis is extended to take more strongly into account three essential elements of the climate problem – the endogeneity of growth, the convexity of damage and climate risk – optimal policy comprises strong controls. read more »


RSS – Myles Allen – Stocks, flows and myopia: the challenge of limiting cumulative carbon emissions

Research Seminar Serie 3 Dec 2014

Myles Allen, Professor of Geosystem Science, Environmental Change Institute, School of Geography and the Environment and Department of Physics, University of Oxford One of the central findings of the IPCC … read more »


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