6
Apr
2011

Report launch event: The Low-Carbon Transition

Date:
6 April, 2011
Venue:
One Exchange Square, London

A joint European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) / Grantham Research Institute event

‘The Low Carbon Transition’ is a special report on climate change mitigation in the countries from central Europe to central Asia, prepared jointly by the Office of the Chief Economist at the EBRD and the Grantham Research Institute at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

EBRD Chief Economist Erik Berglöf and Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute Nicholas Stern will open the launch event. The presentation of the main findings of the report will be followed by a panel discussion and a Q&A session. A reception will follow.

Further details about the event

‘The Low Carbon Transition’ is a special report on climate change mitigation in the countries from central Europe to central Asia, prepared jointly by the Office of the Chief Economist at the EBRD and the Grantham Research Institute at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

No world region has reduced its output of greenhouse gases more radically over the last two decades than the countries in transition. However, the gains in carbon performance have been uneven across countries and the region as a whole still remains carbon intensive in comparison to other parts of the world.

Over the coming decades, transition countries will have to reduce emissions much further. A proactive low carbon transition in the EBRD region is not only required in order to participate at the global efforts to mitigate the risks of dangerous climate change but also to capture new, long-term growth opportunities through investments in clean energy, low-carbon transport and carbon-efficient manufacturing.

This special report looks back at the determinants of emissions reductions experienced in the region over the past two decades and analyses policies and institutions necessary to make the transition to a low carbon economy happen over the coming decades. The analysis looks at opportunities and costs associated with more ambitious mitigation policies, provides an assessment of policy effectiveness in incentivising commercially-driven emission reduction opportunities and discusses the political economy of domestic climate policy.