Law 2010-22 Regulating the Biofuels Industry ( 2010 )

The Law aims to develop the biofuels sector, establishing norms and conditions for the production and exploitation of biofuels in the national territory as well as for international co-operation. More broadly, the law aims to contribute to environmental protection and increase the value of forest and agricultural resources. Overall, the law expects to increase access…read more

Renewable Energy Law (No. 2010-21) ( 2010 )

Regulates the renewable energy sector outlining goals, laying the foundation for a feed-in-tariff scheme, and providing tax incentives for development. Specifically, the law establishes the legal framework for the sustainable development of renewable energy. Goals outlined in this legislation include: reducing dependence on fossil fuels, diversifying the energy mix, reducing GHG emissions and facilitating domestic…read more

Environment Code (Law 2001-01) ( 2001 )

The Code recognises the environment as national and international patrimony, establishing that all citizens have the right to live in a healthy environment, but are also responsible for its protection. Thus, environmental conservation must be integrated in national policies addressing socio-economic development and cultural issues. The key instruments for environmental protections outlines in the Code…read more

Ministerial Decree No. 9.719 on the institutional framework of the Project for the Development of Resilience to Recurrent Food Insecurity in the Sahel ( 2015 )

This decree creates within the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Equipment, a Project Management Unit (PMU) responsible for the implementation of the Food Insecurity Resilience Development Project. This applies to the Sahel in the regions of Fatick, Matam, Saint-Louis, Tambacounda and Ziguinchor (DRIARS Senegal). The aim of the project is to contribute to the reduction…read more

Decree No. 2014-880 on the powers of the Minister of Environment and Sustainable Development ( 2014 )

Outlines the responsibilities of the Minister of the Environment and Sustainable Development, including protecting the environment of Senegal against pollution of any kind and ensuring that polluting activities do not impact the living conditions of the Senegalese people. Further directs the Minister to: - Protect waterways - Preserve fauna and flora - Protect the coasts,…read more

Decree No. 2013-163 (Flood Zones) ( 2013 )

This Decree defines the attributions of the Minister Restructuring and Development of Flood Zones. The Minister should prepare and implement the policy defined by the Head of State in the areas of restructuring and urban development flooding areas, and resettlement through the promotion of social housing.…read more

Decree no. 2013-316 on Rainwater Management and Climate Change Adaption Project ( 2013 )

The Decree no. 2013-316 declares of public interest the Rainwater Management and Climate Change Adaptation Project (PROGEP), in application of Art.3 and articles following of law no. 76/1967 on expropriation due to public interest and other property operations of public interest. The procedure of expropriation must be made in a delay of no more than…read more

Decree No. 2013-684 on the establishment, organization and functioning of the National Agency for Renewable Energies ( 2013 )

The Decree establishes the National Agency for Renewable Energies (ANER), under the technical supervision by the Minister for Energy. ANER’s mission is to promote the use of renewable energy, including bioenergy. As defined in the text of the Decree, the Agency should in particular participate in the definition and formulation of energy policy, contribute to…read more

Ministerial Decree No. 9317 establishing the organization and functioning of the National Greenhouse Gas Reduction Programme through energy efficiency in the building sector and related regulation ( 2013 )

Decree No. 9317 establishes the National Greenhouse Gas Reduction Programme through energy efficiency in the building sector. The overall objective of the programme is to develop energy-efficient practices in the residential and commercial buildings construction sector. The programme aims in particular at: - increasing the number of energy efficient building construction projects using innovative building…read more

Decree 1577 Regulating the Interministerial Committee on Renewable Energy ( 2011 )

Decree 1577 creates and regulates the functioning of the Inter-ministerial Committee on Renewable Energy, bringing together the Ministry of Energy and the Ministry of Renewable Energies. Operating under the supervision of the two ministries, the Committee aims to ensure co-ordination of actions and programmes on renewables, improving efficiency in the sector. Meeting monthly, the Committee…read more

Decree No. 2011-1689 establishing the National Committee on Climate Change ( 2011 )

This decree establishes a National Committee on Climate Change (COMNACC), under the authority of the Ministry of the Environment. The COMNACC is made up of representatives of state, local and associative structures, and it is a body for coordination, consultation, training, awareness raising, management and monitoring of the various activities identified in the implementation of…read more

Ministerial Order No. 9.048 on the Steering Committee of the Program “Towards a Local Development Less Emitter of Greenhouse Gases and More Resistant to Climate Change (TACC Senegal) ( 2010 )

This decree creates a Steering Committee of the Project "Integration of Adaptation to Climate Change in Sustainable Development in Senegal (TACC Senegal)". It defines structure and functions of the Committee.  …read more

Ministerial Order No. 6579 establishing the Technical Committee for disaster risk declaration ( 2009 )

This Ministerial Order creates the Technical Committee of Verification which is responsible for reporting and verifying natural calamities affecting rural areas and causing disaster losses to farms, livestock, forestry and fishing. It establishes the composition and functions of the Technical Committee.  …read more

Decree No. 2008-38 on the powers of the Minister of Biofuels, Renewable Energies, and Scientific Research ( 2008 )

The Decree defines the powers of the Minister of Biofuels, Renewable Energies and Scientific Research related to preparation and implementation of policy on exploration and exploitation of alternative energy sources and promotion of scientific research. In particular, the Minister is responsible drawing up development plans and programs to support clean energy sources and to significantly…read more

Ministerial Order No. 8807 MEPNBRLA-DEEC on the Steering Committee of the Project “Adaptation to Climate Change-Response to Coastal Change and its Human Dimensions in West Africa ( 2008 )

This document establishes, composes and operates the Steering Committee of the Adaptation to Climate Change-Response to Coastal Change and Human Dimensions Project in West Africa within the framework of Integrated Coastal Management (ACCC).…read more

National Bioenergy Strategy and National Strategy on the development of Renewable Energies 2016-2020 ( 2006 )

The National Bioenergy Strategy aims to contribute to national energy security through the production of bioenergy, for transport as well as power generation. It concentrates on developing jatropha (a species of flowering plant) for biodiesel production and sugarcane for ethanol production. The Strategy set an informal goal of planting “a total of 320,000 ha of…read more

Ministerial Decree 1220 establishing the National Climate Change Committee (amended by the Decree 2011-1689) ( 2003 )

The Decree formalises the creation of the National Climate Change Committee (NCCC) with jurisdiction over all domains related to the activities related to the UNFCCC and its legal instruments, such as: a) technological transfer; b) energy efficiency; c) promotion of renewable energy; d) carbon emissions reduction; e) capacity building for biodiversity preservation; f) management of…read more

Economy-wide

NDC Laws and National Policies

3% (unconditional) to 7% (conditional) reduction in 2020, 4% (unconditional) to 15% (conditional) reduction in 2025, and 5% (unconditional) to 21% (conditional) reduction in 2030 in GHG emissions compared to baseline projections

Economy Wide | Baseline Scenario Target | Target year: 2030 | Base year: N/A

Source: NDC

There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Agriculture

NDC Laws and National Policies

Rice cultivation and agroforestry to reduce emissions by 0.35% (2020), 0.51% (2025) and 0.63% (2030)

Agriculture: General | Target year: 2030

Source: NDC

There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Buildings

NDC Laws and National Policies
There are no quantifiable targets found in the NDC.There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Coastal Zones

NDC Laws and National Policies
There are no quantifiable targets found in the NDC.There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Cross-Cutting Area

NDC Laws and National Policies
There are no quantifiable targets found in the NDC.There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Disaster Risk Management (DRM)

NDC Laws and National Policies
There are no quantifiable targets found in the NDC.There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Energy

NDC Laws and National Policies

200 GWh hydropower by 2025

Renewable Energy: Hydro | Target year: 2025

Source: NDC

There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Environment

NDC Laws and National Policies
There are no quantifiable targets found in the NDC.There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Health

NDC Laws and National Policies
There are no quantifiable targets found in the NDC.There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Industry

NDC Laws and National Policies

-10% GHG emissions by 2030, cement (substitute clinker by CO2)

Cement | Target year: 2030

Source: NDC

There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

LULUCF

NDC Laws and National Policies

Reduce emissions derived from bush burning by 30% by 2020 and 90% by 2025 | improve management of natural resources with an aim to reach 1 million ha of forested land by target year | reduce rate of deforestation by 25% by 2023 | improve management of forested land to 60% | protect and reforest 4,000 ha/yr of mangroves | reforestation of 200,000 to 204,000 hectares beginning 2017

LULUCF/Forestry: General | Target year: 2025

Source: NDC

There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Social Development

NDC Laws and National Policies
There are no quantifiable targets found in the NDC.There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Tourism

NDC Laws and National Policies
There are no quantifiable targets found in the NDC.There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Transportation

NDC Laws and National Policies
There are no quantifiable targets found in the NDC.There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Urban

NDC Laws and National Policies
There are no quantifiable targets found in the NDC.There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Waste

NDC Laws and National Policies

-31% GHG emissions by 2030, 115 MW from biogas, waste-to-energy, methane gas capture, sustainable waste management infrastructure

Waste: General | Target year: 2030

Source: NDC

There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Water

NDC Laws and National Policies
There are no quantifiable targets found in the NDC.There are no quantifiable targets found in the laws and policies.

Climate change policy and legislation feature in a complex framework of co-operation. Since Senegal’s 1996 institutional reform, policy-making has been highly decentralised, as local and regional authorities share competences with the national government over several issue-areas, including climate change. Moreover, the international community also plays a leading role in this process, with international organisations and foreign countries working closely with the government and/or civil society on climate issues. As a result, climate change is linked to the promotion of sustainable development, defined in both social and economic terms, and features in a huge range of policy areas, being related to poverty reduction and the promotion of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

 

Senegal has been very active in taking part in global climate governance, especially at the UN level. The country released both a National Adaptation Plan (2006) for the UNFCCC and a National Strategy for Sustainable Development (in 2005), as part of the regional initiative of the UN Economic Commission for Africa. Senegal is also one of the key players behind the Great Green Wall Project. Conceived by the African Union, the project aims to halt the advance of the Sahara desert and entails co-operation amongst 11 countries in the region.

 

At the national level, the foundation of the National Committee on Climate Change (COMNACC) in 2011 contributed to creating a central platform for co-operation on climate change. One of the key roles of the Committee is following the activities developed at the UNFCCC, thus reinforcing the link between global and national climate politics.

 

Senegal approaches climate-related issues in association with its quest for development. On this basis, the 2009-2015 Environment and Natural Resources Sector Policy Letter defines as main objectives of environmental policy the promotion of a sustainable environment to be achieved by the incorporation of sustainable development principles in various national policies.

 

Energy Supply

Energy supply is dominated by biomass (47%) and oil (48%), with the remaining 5% provided by coal, natural gas, hydropower, and solar. All fossil fuels are imported, leaving the country highly vulnerable to price increases. The significant dependence on biomass, specifically wood and charcoal, has also taxed the native forests, contributing to their degradation.

 

Despite the negligible amount of installed renewable generating capacity, Senegal has significant solar energy potential, providing a strong opportunity to develop photovoltaic solar power.  Wind energy potential is also significant between Dakar and Saint Louis and large hydropower potential is estimated to be as high as 1,400MW.

 

In 2012, the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) prepared, in collaborated with the government, a Renewable Readiness Assessment (RRA).  In the foreword to the RRA, the Minister of Energy and Mines articulates that the country’s energy policy aims to increase the proportion of renewable energy and biofuels in the energy mix by 15% by 2020. The RRA identifies four recommendations for itself: (1) detailing a comprehensive strategy for mapping renewable energy potential across the country, (2) facilitating grid integration of renewable sources via enforcement and implementation of the Renewable Energy Law (passed in 2010); (3) restructuring the institutional, legal and regulatory framework for biofuel production and adapting to small-scale renewable projects; and (4) identifying market conditions necessary for private sector involvement in renewable development.

 

Energy policy is outlined under “Letters of Policy Development of the Energy Sector” (LPDSE). The first letter was drafted in 1997 adopting policy measures to be implemented in a five-year period to decrease the cost of energy supply, curbing inefficiency, and increasing funds to develop the energy sector. The second LPDSE was adopted in 2003. Coming into force in 2008, the third LPDSE restructures energy policy by identifying the strategic role renewables could play in energy and transportation. Following from the third LPDSE, institutional, legislative and regulatory structures were strengthened to encourage the development of renewable generation.

 

In 2006, Senegal adopted the National Bioenergy Strategy, to help reinforce energy security by increasing bioenergy production. The strategy centered on the development of jatropha (a species of flowering plant) for biodiesel and sugarcane for ethanol production. The production of ethanol is also included in policies on agriculture sector. Following the launching of the 2006 Strategy, the government institutionalised the National Committee on Biofuels (CNB) to promote co-ordination between the various governmental bodies involved in policy-making on biofuels.

 

Energy Demand

Energy demand is growing; however, the current electricity supply is unreliable and residents and businesses experience recurring power outages. Only about 40% of people have access to electricity; although the urban electrification rate is as high as 70%, only 22% of the rural population has electricity. The 2008 LPDSE aims to increase the national electrification rate to an average of 75% by 2012, in an environmentally aware manner.

 

In 2008, the Senegalese Rural Electrification Agency (ASER) concluded an agreement with the World Bank launching a series of activities under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). The Energy Efficient Lighting Programme aims to provide more affordable electricity to rural areas, providing 1.5m energy efficient compact fluorescent lamps to rural communities. Expecting to save 120,000 tonnes of CO2-equivalent GHG emission reductions with the new light bulbs, ASER will then sell these GHG reductions to the Community Development Carbon Fund, managed by the World Bank.

 

 

 

REDD+ and LULUCF

As a result of the decentralisation of policy-making implemented in 1996, local authorities have a high degree of autonomy over the management of land use and natural resources, including forests. Thus, policies formulated at the national level provide guidelines for the development of local initiatives. The National Forest Service plays a crucial role in supporting local communities, advising on the management and financing activities of forest and land use issues. As part of these initiatives, in 1998 the Ministry of Environment launched the National Action Programme Against Desertification, developing a long-term plan with measures to tackle the issue.

 

The National Forest Policy 2005-2025 provides the basis for national plans and programmes in these areas. Grounded on the principle of decentralisation and the fight against poverty, the main objective of the plan is to contribute to poverty reduction by promoting sustainable management and conservation of biodiversity and forest resources, reaching a socio-environmental balance, but also meeting the needs of the population.

 

Adaptation

The 2006 National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) highlights the three priority areas for climate change adaptation: coastal zones, water infrastructure, and agriculture sectors.  It also outlines the following priority adaptation responses: restoration of mangrove swamps, reforestation, biological stabilization of sand dunes, protection against beach erosion, salinisation prevention measures, irrigation and water conservation projects, soil fertility restoration, crop alternatives, and education.

 

More than 75% of the population is dependent on the land for their well being, in particular rain-fed crops, and fluctuations in seasonal weather patterns are already highlighting the necessity of implementing adaptation measures in the agriculture sector. Specifically, there is a need for scientific data regarding meteorological patterns, soil fertility and adaptive seed varieties.

 

In contrast to rural droughts, the peri-urban areas around Dakar have witnessed recurrent flooding. Senegal is implementing a Stormwater Management and Climate Change Adaptation Project, launched in 2013 to improve flood prevention and stormwater management particularly around Dakar. A 2014 World Bank Implementation Status report reveals the project is on track with about 50% of emergency drainage works complete, resulting in the protection of 18,500 people and 88ha of flood prone area. The 2014 target is the protection of 32,250 vulnerable people and 125ha of land.

 

To date, Senegal does not have any litigation listed.

The Republic of Senegal, which achieved independence from France in 1960, has a legal system based in French civil law and is a semi-presidential liberal democratic republic. The most recent constitution was adopted and promulgated in 2001 and has been amended numerous times, most recently in 2008. The President is the head of State, while the Prime Minister is the head of Government and both the Government and Parliament possess legislative power.

 

Senegal currently has a unicameral Parliament, the National Assembly, composed of 150 seats, 90 members of which are elected by direct and popular vote and 60 of which are selected on the basis of proportional representation from a list of political parties. All members serve five-year terms. The most recent parliamentary election was held in 2012 and the next election is due to be held in 2017. The legislature has periodically fluctuated between a unicameral and bicameral parliament, and has been unicameral since 2012.

 

The legislative process in Senegal is comprised of three stages: drafting of the text, parliamentary scrutiny, and presidential sanction. Laws regarding public finance and security have a special procedure, but ordinary laws all follow the same process. Proposals can be drafted by members of the Assembly or by the competent bodies of the various ministries of the executive power.

 

In the first phase, the draft text is evaluated by one of eight permanent commissions or a special committee of the Assembly, depending on the subject. Following initial passage, the text is included in the agenda of the plenary session and discussed amongst all members of the Assembly in a public session. Once approved or amended by a majority of votes, the final text is submitted to the general secretariat of the government and the President. The President has 15 days to sanction the new law, which will then be published in the official journal to enter into force.

Last modified 22 August, 2017