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History of Postwar Social Science Workshop

2014

12 December 2014

History of Postwar Social Science Workshop, London School of Economics, Lakatos Building, Room LAK.2.06

Supported by the CNRC European Scientific Coordination Network (GDRE #711)

Programme|

 

2013

6 December 2013

History of Postwar Social Science Workshop, London School of Economics, Lakatos Building, Room LAK.2.06

Supported by the CNRS European Scientific Coordination Network (GDRE #711)

Programme|

22 February 2013

History of Postwar Social Science Workshop, London School of Economics, Lakatos Building, Room LAK.2.06

Supported by the CNRS European Scientific Coordination Network

Programme|

 

2011

12 December 2011
History of Postwar Social Science Workshop
London School of Economics, Lakatos Building, Room T206
Supported by the CNRS European Scientific Coordination Network

Programme|

 

2010

6 December 2010

Workshop on the 6th December|

Organised by
Roger Backhouse || and Philippe Fontaine ||
Venue: Lakatos Building, Room T206

The workshop is one of the activities of the History of Post-war Social Science Group, supported by grants from the Leverhulme Trust ('Academic Collaboration International Networks') and the French CNRS (GDRE 'History of Recent Economics')

Monday, 1st November 2010

10.00 – 10.50 Jean-Baptiste Fleury, EconomiX-Cachan - H2S
The Evolving Notion of Relevance: An Historical Perspective to the 'Economics-Made-Fun' movement

11.00 – 11.50 Daniel Geary, Trinity College Dublin
Race, Liberalism, and Social Science: The 1965 Daedalus Conference on the 'Negro American'

12.00 – 12.50 Peter Mandler, University of Cambridge
Deconstructing Cold-War anthropology

14.15 – 15.05 Daniel Immerwahr, University of California Berkeley
The Small Group: A Focal Point of Midcentury Social Science

15.20 – 16.20 Ed Gitre, University of Virginia
'A Typological Menagerie': Post-war Psychoculturalists and the Triumph of the (American) Social-scientific Imagination

Note that the exact timing and order of the papers may change 

 

2009

Workshop, 6th March 2009

10:00am-10:45am
Teresa Tomas Rangil, EconomiX-Cachan
Insurgencies across the Rice Fields: Social Scientists and Indochina, 1960-1975

11:00-11:45am
Tiago Mata, University of Amsterdam
Why were they fired? Allegations and judgments of political discrimination of social scientists in 1970s America

12:00pm-13:30pm
Lunch

13:30-14:15pm
Romain Huret, University of Lyon 2
Poverty in Cold War America: a problem that has no name. The invisible network of poverty experts in the 1950s

14:30-15:15pm
Daniel Geary, Trinity College, Dublin
Economics and Sociology: Competing or Complementary Perspectives in the Post-World War II U.S

Teresa Tomas Rangil, EconomiX-CachanInsurgencies across the Rice Fields: Social Scientists and Indochina, 1960-1975Tiago Mata, University of AmsterdamWhy were they fired? Allegations and judgments of political discrimination of social scientists in 1970s AmericaLunchPoverty in Cold War America: a problem that has no name. The invisible network of poverty experts in the 1950sEconomics and Sociology: Competing or Complementary Perspectives in the Post-World War II U.S

2008

Tuesday, 22 January 2008,  5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Philip Mirowski
University of Notre Dame
The Concept of the Political in Postwar International Relations and Postwar Neoliberal Political Economy|

Tuesday, 19 February 2008,  5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Andrew Scull
University of California at San Diego
The Mental Health Sector and the Social Sciences in Post World War II America|

Tuesday, 4 March 2008,  5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Michael Redclift
King's College, University of London
On Sustainable Development|

Tuesday, 29 April 2008,  5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Peter Dickens
University of Cambridge & University of Essex
Environmental Sociology: Capitalism, Sustainability and Social Justice|

Tuesday, 6 May 2008,  5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Robert H. Frank
Cornell University
Does Rising Income Inequality Harm the Middle Class?|

2007

Tuesday, 23 January 2007,  5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
John Brewer
University of Aberdeen
C. Wright Mills, the LSE and the Sociological Imagination|

Tuesday, 6 February 2007, 5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Esther-Mirjam Sent
University of Nijmegen
Some Like It Cold: Thomas Schelling as a Cold Warrior|

Tuesday, 6 March 2007, 5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Adam Kuper
Brunel University
Ernest Gellner: A Philosopher as Anthropologist|

Tuesday, 24 April 2007, 5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Alexandra Rutherford
York University
B. F. Skinner from Laboratory to Life|

Tuesday, 22 May 2007, 5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Hunter Heyck
University of Oklahoma
Herbert Simon's interdisciplinary project|

Tuesday, 12 June 2007, 5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
James Farr
University of Minnesota
The Political Science of Science: Harold Lasswell and Disciplinary Historiography|

2006

Tuesday, 17 January 2006 5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
A. H. Halsey
Nuffield College, University of Oxford
British 20th Century Sociology in International and Interdisciplinary Context

Tuesday, 28 February 2006, 5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Adam Kuper
Brunel University
Alternative Histories of British Social Anthropology|

Tuesday, 14 March 2006, 5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Roger Backhouse
University of Birmingham
Economics in the Postwar Period|

Tuesday, 25 April 2006, 5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Ron Johnston
Bristol University
Sixty Years of Change in Human Geography|

Tuesday, 30 May 2006, 5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Michael Kenny
University of Sheffield
The History of Political Science in Britain: Issues and Turning Points

Tuesday, 6 June 2006, 5:00-6:30 pm
HISTORY OF POSTWAR SOCIAL SCIENCE
Mitchell G. Ash

University of Vienna, Austria
Psychology Since 1945: Institutional and International Fragmentation, Cognitive Differentiation, Reflexivit|y

Abstracts

Tuesday, 6 May 2008,  5:00-6:30 pm
History of Postwar Social Science
Robert H. Frank
Cornell University
Does Rising Income Inequality Harm the Middle Class?

Although the top one percent of earners in the US earn almost three times as much as in 1979, median earnings have grown little since then. This change has spawned "expenditure cascades" that have raised the cost of achieving many basic life goals. Thus, higher incomes have prompted top earners to build larger homes, shifting the context that defines adequate housing for others just below them. They, too, build bigger, and the process repeats itself all the way down the income ladder. This explains why the median new home now has some 2,400 square feet of living space, roughly 50 percent larger than in 1970.
Middle-class families could simply buy the smaller houses such families bought in 1970. But given the link between school quality and average neighborhood house prices, that would mean sending their children to below-average schools. Many families prefer to buy the bigger houses, even if they don't care about the extra space.
Similar expenditure cascades explain why people in the middle must now buy heavier cars to maintain an acceptable level of safety; buy more expensive suits to remain competitive in job interviews; and spend more for gifts to meet expectations on important social occasions.

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