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Expertise

More than 100 scholars at the School currently work on Africa, based in a wide range of social science disciplines including anthropology, development studies, economics, geography, health, international relations, politics, social policy and social psychology.

Agriculture

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Dr Jason Hickel
Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in Anthropology

Dr Jason Hickel specialises on globalisation, finance, democracy, violence, and ritual, and has been engaged in ethnographic and archival research in Southern Africa since 2004. His present research focuses on finance in South Africa, looking at how the central bank manages market expectations and economic behaviour in the post-crisis context through technologies of public communication.

Follow him on Twitter @jasonhickel

 


 

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Dr Gisa Weszkalnys
Assistant Professor in Anthropology

Dr Gisa Weszkalnys specialises in the ethnographic study of natural resources, specifically oil in Africa. In the past, she has carried out intensive research on the politics of urban planning in Germany. She also worked on interdisciplinary research policy and practice in Europe and the US. Dr Weszkalnys has carried out consultancy research in the field of natural resources and development, for example, with UNDP in São Tomé and Príncipe and with the Open Society Institute in Angola.

 

Business

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Professor Harry Barkema
Professor of Management

Over the past 20 years, Professor Harry Barkema has published numerous articles in the world's top management journals and received several honorary professorships. He was the first European associate editor of a leading empirical journal in management, the Academy of Management Journal and was awarded the best paper prize of the AoM Journal in 1998. Professor Barkema is on the Board of Governors of the Academy of Management (AoM) and a number of its sub-committees (e.g., the Journals Committee). Within the AoM, he has engaged in or led dozens of panels, consortia (doctoral and faculty) and professional development workshops for young researchers.

Professor Barkema is also the founding Director of the Innovation Co-Creation Lab (ICCL) where currently 20 people work on fundamental research and teaching (MSc, PhD, Executive education). This research includes; how to design innovative teams, innovation communities around websites, innovative science parks & corporate campuses, and successful business model innovation in close cooperation with companies. One set of new initiatives focuses on business model innovation at the base of the pyramid (BOP), in cooperation with multinational corporations, NGOs, and local businesses in South East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and South America.

 


 

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Dr Christian Busch
Associate Director & Researcher, Innovation Co-Creation Lab in Management

Dr Christian Busch works with governments, multinational companies, and (social) enterprises to develop scalable inclusive business models. His related research centres on entrepreneurship, social innovation, social networks, co-creation, and business model innovation, and he teaches several MSc- and executive education courses at LSE. He was also co-founder of Sandbox, where he developed the hub-based structure and expanded the community and organization into 20 countries. He has been named as one of Diplomatic Courier’s “Top 99 Influencers under 33”, JCI London's "Ten Outstanding Persons", a TEDster, a Siemens 'Key Influencer', and a fellow at the Royal Society of Arts. He frequently speaks at major conferences such as the World Economic Forum (WEF), TED/TEDx, and the Financial Times' Sustainability Summit, and his ideas have been featured by outlets such as Harvard Business Review. A recent talk on ‘developing mission-driven organizations’ can be found here: http://bit.ly/dUDAik. Previously, he worked in consulting/business in Kenya, S. Africa, Mexico, Russia, Germany, the US, and took on external leadership roles such as Impact Advisor at the National Entrepreneurship Association.

 

Civil Society

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Dr Kate Meagher
Associate Professor in Development Studies

Dr Kate Meagher has engaged in extensive empirical and theoretical research on the informal economy in rural and urban Africa, with a particular focus on Nigeria. Her current research interests include social networks and non-state governance in Africa, the politics of economic informality, enterprise clusters, vigilantism and organised crime, and new religious movements.

 


 

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Dr Claire Mercer
Associate Professor of Human Geography

Working at the interface of Human Geography, African Studies and Development Studies, Dr Claire Mercer's early research developed a geographical critique of the concept of civil society that confronted assumptions about the spatiality and makeability’ of African civil society. Drawing on ideas from postcolonial studies this work recast the discussion of civil society in Africa in terms that emphasized the diverse social and political work done by civil society actors such as NGOs and home associations.

Recent research has been concerned with the relationship between the African diaspora and the African continent. This research places Africa at the centre of questions about diaspora. Dr Mercer recently completed a four-year ESRC-funded research project, graded ‘outstanding’, which examined the development work undertaken in Africa by diaspora communities in Britain. This involved a study of four transnational home associations from Cameroon and Tanzania (with Ben Page, UCL; and Martin Evans, University of Chester). The book based on the project, Development and the African diaspora: place and the politics of home is published by Zed Books. is published by Zed Books. 

Dr Mercer is currently working on new research on the middle classes, domestic architecture and suburban space in Tanzania.

 


 

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Dr Hakan Seckinelgin
Associate Professor in Social Policy

Dr Hakan Seckinelgin has worked on the impact of international HIV/AIDS policies on the disease in sub-Saharan Africa (Botswana, Uganda, Rwanda, Zambia and South Africa) by analysing the agency of international actors and their knowledge claims. He has also done research on the politics and social policy of international relations.

  


 

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Dr Gisa Weszkalnys
Assistant Professor in Anthropology

Dr Gisa Weszkalnys specialises in the ethnographic study of natural resources, specifically oil in Africa. In the past, she has carried out intensive research on the politics of urban planning in Germany. She also worked on interdisciplinary research policy and practice in Europe and the US. Dr Weszkalnys has carried out consultancy research in the field of natural resources and development, for example, with UNDP in São Tomé and Príncipe and with the Open Society Institute in Angola.

 

Conflict and Human Rights

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Dr Kirsten Ainley
Assistant Professor in International Relations

Dr Kirsten Ainley is Assistant Professor of International Relations and Director of the Centre for International Studies at the London School of Economics. Her research focuses on the history and development of international criminal law, international political theory, human rights and humanitarian intervention. She has published on international criminal law, transitional justice, the International Criminal Court, individual and collective responsibility for atrocity and the notion of evil in international relations. She is the co-author of Understanding International Relations (2009) with Chris Brown.

Follow her on Twitter: @kirstenainley

 


 

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Professor Tim Allen
Professor of Development Anthropology
Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa
Head of Department, Department of International Development

Professor Tim Allen is the inaugural Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa and the Head of the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Tim has expertise in the fields of complex emergencies, ethnic conflict, forced migration, local conceptions of health and healing, controlling tropical diseases, humanitarianism and development aid. Much of his field research has focussed on East Africa.

 


 

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Dr Chaloka Beyani
Associate Professor of International Law
Member of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights and Chair of its Advisory Board
Member of the Centre for Climate Change

Dr Chaloka Beyani is also the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons. He joined the Department of Law at LSE in 1996 and lectures in international law and human rights. He was formerly a Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford, with Lectureships in Law at Exeter and St. Catherine's colleges, Oxford, and a Crown Prince of Jordan Fellow, Queen Elizabeth House, as part of the Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford.

Dr Beyani studied law at the University of Oxford (D.Phil) and at the University of Zambia (UNZA)(LLB, LLM). He has taught international law, human rights, public law, and criminal law at Oxford and UNZA. He is Visiting Professor of International Law at the University of Toronto and Santa Clara University. 

Dr Beyani is a recognised international and United Nations expert on internally displaced persons, population transfers, mercenaries and private military companies, sexual and reproductive health, the human rights based approach to development, climate change, making treaties, and making constitutions. He has served as a legal adviser and expert to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the Office of the High Commissioner on Refugees, the World Health Organization, the United Nations Population Fund, United Nations Development Fund for Women, the European Union, the Commonwealth Secretariat, and the African Union. 

He was a member of the High Level Panel of Eminent Persons of the African Union on the Formation of an African Union Government. He has served as an expert to the African Union on the issue of universal jurisdiction and was a member of the joint African Union and European Union ad hoc Expert Group on Universal Jurisdiction. He is currently a member of the UK Foreign Secretary's Advisory Group on Human Rights.

Dr Beyani has practical legal and political experience in making national constitutions. He was a member of the official Committee of Experts on Constitutional Review of the Republic of Kenya, the Committee that drafted and prepared the Constitution of Kenya, which was adopted by referendum in 2010. He also has practical legal and diplomatic experience in treaty making, having drafted and negotiated the adoption of the African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons 2009. He also drafted and negotiated the adoption of 11 peace treaties under the framework of the Pact on Peace, Stability and Development of the Great Lakes Region 2006.

 


 

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Professor Matthew Engelke
Professor in Anthropology

Professor Matthew Engelke’s research focuses in the broadest sense on the connections between religion and culture, primarily in Africa and Britain. He has conducted in-depth fieldwork on an African Church in Zimbabwe, evangelical Christians in England, and, most recently, secular humanists in Britain. Throughout this work, he has examined such issues as the importance of textual authority within religious communities; the dynamics of conversion and belief; religion and material culture; religion and media; the role of religion in public life; ritual; and conceptions of the secular and humanism. In addition to these fieldwork-based projects, Professor Engelke has also conducted research in the history of anthropology. His research has been funded by, among other sources, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Fulbright-Hays Commission, the British Academy, the Economic and Social Research Council, and the LSE’s Annual Fund.

 


  

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Professor Fawaz Gerges
Emirates Chair in Contemporary Middle East Studies
Professor of International Relations

Professor Fawaz Gerges’ most recent books are Contentious Politics in the Middle East: Popular Resistance and Marginalised Activism beyond the Arab Uprisings (Palgrave Macmillan, September 2015); The New Middle East: Protest and Revolution in the Arab World (Cambridge University Press, November 2013); Obama and the Middle East: The End of America’s Moment? (Palgrave Macmillan, September 2013). On the ten-year anniversary of 9/11, Oxford University Press released Professor Gerges’ book, The Rise and Fall of Al Qaeda.

His special interests include Islam and the political process, social movements, including mainstream Islamist movements and jihadist groups (like the Muslim Brotherhood and Al Qaeda), Arab politics and Muslim politics in the 20th century, the international relations of the Middle East, the Arab-Israeli conflict, state and society in the Middle East, American foreign policy towards the Muslim world, the modern history of the Middle East, history of conflict, diplomacy and foreign policy, and historical sociology.

 


 

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Dr Elliott Green
Associate Professor of Development Studies

Dr Elliott Green is primarily concerned with the political demography of ethnicity and nationalism in the modern world, with a specific focus on sub-Saharan Africa. In particular he is interested in the causes and consequences of urbanisation, the origins of ethnic diversity and ethnic identity change, the relationship between nationalism and economic development and the political economy of rural patronage. He has carried out field work in Uganda, Tanzania and Botswana.

 


 

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Dr Marsha Henry
Associate Professor, Gender Institute
Deputy Director, Centre for Women, Peace and Security

Dr Marsha Henry joined LSE in July 2009, having previously taught at University of Bristol, University of British Columbia, Canada, the Open University and Warwick University. She read English Literature at the University of British Columbia, Canada, before studying for a Master's in Gender and International Development at the University of Warwick. She continued her postgraduate studies at Warwick obtaining a PhD in Women and Gender in 2001. She carried out postdoctoral research in the Centre for Women's Studies and Gender Relations at the University of British Columbia, before returning to the UK in order to take up a position at the University of Bristol in 2002. Before taking up her post at LSE, she was a lecturer in the School for Policy Studies (2002-2006) and the Politics Department at the University of Bristol (2006-2009).

Follow her on Twitter: @mghacademic

 


 

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Dr Devika Hovell
Assistant Professor in Public International Law

Dr Devika Hovell’s research interests include the United Nations; the use of force and international humanitarian law; international courts and tribunals; the interface between public law and public international law; and the relationship between international law and domestic law. 

Follow her on Twitter: @DCHovell

 


  

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Dr Stephen Humphreys
Associate Professor of International Law

Dr Stephen Humphrey’s core areas of expertise include climate change, in particular as it creates or exacerbates human rights risks; and international criminal law, with a particular emphasis on the transnational construction of crime and the remaking of sovereignty. He has published in each of these areas, and his work on climate change has been recognised as groundbreaking.

Dr Humphrey's current research focuses on the distribution of risk and security under international and transnational law. The work looks at various different areas of law - international security arrangements, international criminal law, environmental law, investment and trade law, transnational developmental and financial arrangements - in order to gauge their overall impact in combination on the experience of risk.

He retains a special interest in the fragmentation of international law, in legal theory - drawing in particular on critical theory - and in rule of law promotion: the contemporary form of law and development.

 


 

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Professor David Keen
Professor of Complex Emergencies

Professor David Keen’s research areas are in famine, civil war, human rights, Sudan, Sierra Leone and Northern Iraq.

 


 

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Dr Brian Klaas
Fellow in Comparative Politics

Dr Brian Klaas graduated Summa Cum Laude with his B.A. in Politics and History from Carleton College (Minnesota, USA) in 2008. During the course of his MPhil (St. Antony’s College, Oxford; 2013) and his DPhil (New College, Oxford; 2015), he conducted extensive field research interviewing politicians, rebels, generals, diplomats, journalists, and journalists in Madagascar, Thailand, Tunisia, Côte d’Ivoire, and Zambia as part of his dissertation, which argued that election rigging often provokes coups d’état and civil wars. 

Follow him on Twitter @brianklaas

 


 

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Dr Anna MacDonald
Fellow, Department of International Development

Dr Anna Macdonald joined the International Development department in 2013 as an LSE Fellow. She holds a BA in modern history from the University of Oxford; an MSc in the Theory and History of International Relations from the LSE and a PhD in War Studies from King’s College London.
Anna's research interests are in conceptions of law, justice, statehood and social order in central Africa. She is currently in receipt of a Leverhulme British Academy research grant and also works as a research fellow on the DFID-funded Conflict Research Programme (CRP), which examines violence and political markets in Africa and the Middle East and the new ESRC-funded Centre for Public Authority and International Development (CPAID).  Her recent research has been published in Development and Change, Africa, and the International Journal on Minority and Group Rights. 

 


 

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Dr Bronwen Manby
Visiting Senior Fellow, Centre for the Study of Human Rights

Dr Bronwen Manby is an independent consultant in the field of human rights, democracy and good governance, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. She has written on a wide range of human rights issues in Africa, with particular interests in South Africa and Nigeria (especially the oil industry in the Niger Delta), and in continental developments in human rights law. Recently, her research and writing have focused on statelessness, comparative nationality law, and legal identity, and she has worked closely with UNHCR on its global campaign against statelessness. 

Dr Manby worked for the Open Society Foundations from 2004 to 2014, where she founded the Africa Governance Monitoring and Advocacy Project (AfriMAP), an initiative to monitor and strengthen compliance with the African Union's commitments on good governance and human rights, and led research on a range of other issues related to the foundations' work in Africa. She was previously the deputy director of the Africa division of Human Rights Watch, where she worked for 11 years, and has also worked for human rights organisations in South Africa.  She is a board member of the Westminster Foundation for Democracy.Bronwen has degrees from Oxford and Columbia Universities, is qualified as a solicitor in England and Wales, and in 2015 was awarded a doctorate by Maastricht University faculty of law.

Follow her on Twitter: @BronwenManby

 


 

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Dr Omar McDoom
Assistant Professor in Comparative Politics

Dr Omar McDoom is interested in the causes of political violence between groups - be they defined along ethnic, religious, or other social lines. Genocides, civil wars, ethnic conflicts, as well as insurgencies and terrorism are within the scope of his interest. He has particular knowledge of the Rwandan genocide and of Africa’s Great Lakes region more generally. He is also interested in the politics of the development and humanitarian aid industries – especially in how they operate in sub-Saharan Africa.

Dr McDoom has previously held research fellowships at Harvard and Oxford Universities. He has worked as a Policy Officer for the World Bank, a Legal Officer for the Government of Guyana, and on electoral missions for the OSCE and UN. He co-directs a non-profit organisation, Latin Balle Pee, which develops leadership ability in children caught in northern Uganda's civil war: www.thechildisinnocent.org

Follow him on Twitter: @omarmcdoom

 


 

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Dr Jens Meierhenrich
Associate Professor of International Relations

Dr Jens Meierhenrich is the author of Lawfare: The Formation and Deformation of Gacaca Jurisdictions in Rwanda, 1994-2012 and also recently authored The Legacies of Law: Long-Run Consequences of Legal Development in South Africa, 1652-2000, which won the American Political Science Association’s 2009 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award for the “best book published in the United States during the previous year in politics, government, or international affairs.” He served as a Visiting Professional in Trial Chamber II at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and in the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court, where he worked with Luis Moreno Ocampo. He has also published Genocide: A Reader (Oxford University Press, 2014) and Genocide: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2014)

 


 

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Dr Claire Moon
Associate Professor in Sociology
Senior Research Associate, Centre for the Study of Human Rights

Dr Claire Moon holds degrees in Literature, International Relations and Politics. She is something of an accidental academic, having spent many years prior to academic life working in bookshops and libraries. She joined LSE Sociology in 2004.

Dr Moon is a leading critical scholar in, and of, the field of transitional justice, and has made important contributions to the sociology of human rights. Her work traverses a number of areas of sociological investigation, including socio-legal studies, human rights, the sociology of knowledge, criminology, politics and more recently, science and technology studies. She has worked on topics such as political transitions, post-conflict reconciliation, truth commissions, reparations, war trauma, genocide, human rights reporting and activism, and science and human rights with a focus on forensic investigations of atrocity.

 


 

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Dr Holly Porter
Visiting Fellow in International Development
Lead Researcher (Northern Uganda), Justice and Security Research Programme

Dr Holly Porter is a Research Fellow in the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics and holds a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship with the Institute of Development Policy and Management (University of Antwerp) and the Conflict Research Group (Ghent University).

Holly's research has focused on gender, sexualities, violence, and local notions of healing and justice in northern Uganda where she has lived for more than ten years.

She is the author of After Rape: violence justice and social harmony in Uganda, published by Cambridge University Press. Her work has also been published in journals including Africa, the Women's Studies International Forum, and the Journal of Eastern African Studies.

 

Demography

 

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Dr Emily Freeman
Research Fellow in Social Policy, LSE Health and Personal Social Services Research Unit 

Dr Emily Freeman is an anthropological demographer focused on ageing and sexual and reproductive health, and the way in which they shape and are shaped by social institutions and processes. Dr Freeman's research includes long term social care in Africa, sexual behaviour and HIV/AIDS in older age, sexual health (including abortion), sexual partnerships and fertility intentions.

 


 

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Dr Tiziana Leone
Assistant Professor in Social Policy

Dr Tiziana Leone is a demographer with a statistical background. She is particularly interested in reproductive maternal health and health systems in low-income countries. Some of the past work she has done include the role of social networks and community factors affecting family planning choices and overmedicalisation of births.

Dr Leone is currently working on projects that analyse the effect of health systems reforms on health inequalities and on the demand versus supply influence on the increasing caesarean sections' rates. She is also interested in the use of demographic data sources in low resource countries such as census and survey data.

 

Development

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Professor Sylvia Chant
Professor of Development Geography

Professor Sylvia Chant's main and enduring interests are gender, poverty, migration, women's employment, household survival strategies and female-headed households. She has a particular interest in families and households, lone parenthood, female-headed households, men and masculinities, migration, employment, housing, urban informal economy, poverty, the ‘feminisation of poverty’, and household livelihoods. Her geographical expertise extends across Africa, Asia and Latin America, with dedicated field experience  in Gambia, Philippines, Costa Rica and Mexico.

In 2011, Professor Chant was made a Fellow of the RSA in recognition of her expertise and exploration of gender issues within geographical development, and in 2015 was conferred as a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences on account of her role in ‘helping to stake out the field of gender and development’.

Sylvia’s latest books include The International Handbook of Gender and Poverty: Concepts, Research, Policy (Elgar, 2010, editor), and Cities,Slums and Gender in the Global South: Towards a Feminised Urban Future (Routledge, 2016, co-authored with Cathy McIlwaine).

 


 

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Professor Eve Mitleton-Kelly
Director, LSE Complexity Research Group

Professor Eve Mitleton-Kelly’s research has concentrated on the implications of the theories of complexity for organisations and specifically on strategy and policy development and on the creation of enabling environments to address apparently intractable problems in business and the public sector. She has led and participated in projects addressing practical problems using complexity theory, funded by the EPSRC (Engineering & Physical Sciences Research Council), ESRC (Economics & Social Sciences Research Council), AHRC (Art & Humanities Research Council), the European Commission, business and government, including: alignment between IT and the rest of the business; the reduction of problems associated with IT legacy systems; lack of organisational integration post-merger; project governance for a national project delivered locally by multiple partners for the Royal British Legion; a framework of governance for government with 6 Government Administrations; leadership in the National Health Service (UK), Defra, and many other organisations in the private and public sectors; sustainable development in communities, organisational learning, the emergence of new organisational forms, the ‘design’ of organisations, co-evolutionary sustainability, innovation in the private and public sector, diversity, art & complexity, disaster risk reduction in West African States, energy & climate change; relationship between policy and outcomes (Health & Safety Executive); uncertainty & risk in decision making for Local Government; and contingency planning related to evacuation following a major disaster.

 


 

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Dr Laura Mann
Assistant Professor in International Development

Dr Laura Mann is a sociologist whose research focuses on the political economy of markets and new information and communication technologies in Africa. She received her Masters and PhD from the Centre of African Studies at the University of Edinburgh and her BSc in Environmental Policy and Economics from the London School of Economics. 

Before joining the LSE as an assistant professor, she worked as a postdoc at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford and the African Studies Centre in Leiden. Her geographical expertise includes Egypt, Sudan, Kenya, Rwanda and more recently, South Africa. If she could sum up her research interests in one question, it would be "under what conditions do people become recognisably valuable to their governments (both economically and politically)?" 

Follow her on Twitter: @balootiful

 


 

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Professor Thandika Mkandawire
Professor of African Development

Professor Thandika Mkandawire is former Director of the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development. Professor Mkandawire was formerly Director of the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA), a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Development Research in Copenhagen and has taught at the Universities of Stockholm and Zimbabwe.

He currently holds the Olof Palme Professor for Peace with the Institute for Future Studies in Stockholm. 

His research interests are mostly in development theory, economic policy and development and social policy in developing countries and political economy of development in Africa. Follow him on

Follow him on Twitter: @tmkandawire

 

Economics

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Dr Leigh Gardner
Assistant Professor in Economic History

Dr Leigh Gardner's research focuses on the economic history of Africa and the British Empire. She is particularly interested in the monetary and fiscal systems of sub-Saharan Africa during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and in comparative research which places African countries in a global context. Her first book, Taxing Colonial Africa: The Political Economy of British Imperialism (Oxford, 2012) illustrates how fiscal imperatives shapes British colonial institutions in African colonies. Most recently, Dr Gardner has begun a project comparing the development of independent countries in Africa with their colonised neighbours in order to distinguish the effects of colonialism from more general constraints on development faced by peripheral countries before World War II. She is also extending her work on the financial organisation of the British Empire, looking particularly at how efforts to resolve agency problems helped shape imperial institutions.

 


 

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Dr Jonathan Leape
Associate Professor of Economics

Dr Jonathan Leape is the Executive Director of the IGC.  He is also an Associate Professor of Economics at the LSE and was previously director of the highly innovative “LSE 100 The LSE Course: Understanding the Causes of Things” since 2009.  He was the founding director of the Centre for Research into Economics and Finance in Southern Africa, which was established at LSE in 1990 as an initiative of the Commonwealth Heads of Government to support the democratic transition in South Africa. His research interests centre on public economics, with a particular focus on taxation and regulation, including congestion charging.

 


 

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Dr Stephanie Levy
Visiting Research Fellow in International Development

Dr Stephanie Levy is a development economist with over 15 years of experience in rural development and poverty reduction policies in Africa and South-East Asia. Dr Levy has an extensive experience of modelling and policy analysis using simulation tools and quantitative analysis methods. As an academic researcher, she worked on agricultural development policies, including natural resources management, public investment in rural infrastructure and services, food price and poverty reduction. Her PhD research examines the use of natural resource revenue to finance pro-poor growth strategies.

This work is applied to the case of Chad using a general equilibrium model to compare different public investment strategies. Dr Levy has also worked on the land reform in Zimbabwe for the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and the World Bank, studying which investment policies should complement the land redistribution programme to prevent the food production and the productivity in the agricultural sector to fall.

Her current research focuses on the local economic impact of social protection and cash transfers, the complementarity between rural development policies and social transfers and the impact of financial chocks and stresses on household behaviour in West-Africa.

 


 

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Professor Gerard Padró i Miquel
Professor of Economics

Professor Gerard Padró i Miquel’s current research interests include foreign influence and welfare, the rise of China and natural resource curse in Africa and conflict and deterrence under strategic risk.

 


 

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Professor Thandika Mkandawire
Professor of African Development

Professor Thandika Mkandawire is former Director of the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development. Professor Mkandawire was formerly Director of the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA), a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Development Research in Copenhagen and has taught at the Universities of Stockholm and Zimbabwe.

He currently holds the Olof Palme Professor for Peace with the Institute for Future Studies in Stockholm. 

His research interests are mostly in development theory, economic policy and development and social policy in developing countries and political economy of development in Africa. Follow him on

Follow him on Twitter: @tmkandawire

 


 

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Dr Charles Palmer
Assistant Professor of Environment and Development

Dr Charles Palmer is an economist working at the interface of environment and development, specialising in 'green' issues such as those, for example, relating to rural development and deforestation. Typically, he applies both quantitative methods and conceptual frameworks to analyse environmental decision-making at the micro-level, e.g. household or village. His recent work has focused on land use and climate change, specifically on carbon sequestration contracts and Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD), the cost-effectiveness of policy to implement payments for environmental services (PES), and the evolution of protected area policy under weak property rights.

 


 

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Professor John Sutton
Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics

Professor John Sutton's research focuses on processes of globalisation, trade liberalisation, and economic transformations. His Enterprise Map Project aims at providing a detailed profile of industries and of leading industrial companies in each of several countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The first four volumes are on Ethiopia, Ghana, Tanzania, Zambia and Mozambique.

 

Environment

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Dr Chaloka Beyani
Associate Professor of International Law
Member of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights and Chair of its Advisory Board
Member of the Centre for Climate Change

Dr Chaloka Beyani is also the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons. He joined the Department of Law at LSE in 1996 and lectures in international law and human rights. He was formerly a Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford, with Lectureships in Law at Exeter and St. Catherine's colleges, Oxford, and a Crown Prince of Jordan Fellow, Queen Elizabeth House, as part of the Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford.

Dr Beyani studied law at the University of Oxford (D.Phil) and at the University of Zambia (UNZA)(LLB, LLM). He has taught international law, human rights, public law, and criminal law at Oxford and UNZA. He is Visiting Professor of International Law at the University of Toronto and Santa Clara University. 

Dr Beyani is a recognised international and United Nations expert on internally displaced persons, population transfers, mercenaries and private military companies, sexual and reproductive health, the human rights based approach to development, climate change, making treaties, and making constitutions. He has served as a legal adviser and expert to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the Office of the High Commissioner on Refugees, the World Health Organization, the United Nations Population Fund, United Nations Development Fund for Women, the European Union, the Commonwealth Secretariat, and the African Union. 

He was a member of the High Level Panel of Eminent Persons of the African Union on the Formation of an African Union Government. He has served as an expert to the African Union on the issue of universal jurisdiction and was a member of the joint African Union and European Union ad hoc Expert Group on Universal Jurisdiction. He is currently a member of the UK Foreign Secretary's Advisory Group on Human Rights.

Dr Beyani has practical legal and political experience in making national constitutions. He was a member of the official Committee of Experts on Constitutional Review of the Republic of Kenya, the Committee that drafted and prepared the Constitution of Kenya, which was adopted by referendum in 2010. He also has practical legal and diplomatic experience in treaty making, having drafted and negotiated the adoption of the African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons 2009. He also drafted and negotiated the adoption of 11 peace treaties under the framework of the Pact on Peace, Stability and Development of the Great Lakes Region 2006.

 


 

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Professor Declan Conway
Professorial Research Fellow in the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment 

Professor Declan Conway's research cuts across water, climate and society, with a strong focus on adaptation and international development. Originally a geographer, Professor Conway draws on insights from different disciplines to pursue problem focused research. He has over 20 years’ experience working in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia (particularly China).

 


 

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Dr Ben Groom
Associate Professor in Environment and Development Economics

Dr Ben Groom is an applied economist whose main research focus is on intergenerational equity and social discounting for long-term public projects, such as those relating to climate change and biodiversity conservation. He also does empirical work and applied theory on agricultural development and adaptation to climate change, deforestation and biodiversity economics.

 


 

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Dr Stephen Humphreys
Associate Professor of International Law

Dr Stephen Humphrey’s core areas of expertise include climate change, in particular as it creates or exacerbates human rights risks; and international criminal law, with a particular emphasis on the transnational construction of crime and the remaking of sovereignty. He has published in each of these areas, and his work on climate change has been recognised as groundbreaking.

Dr Humphrey's current research focuses on the distribution of risk and security under international and transnational law. The work looks at various different areas of law - international security arrangements, international criminal law, environmental law, investment and trade law, transnational developmental and financial arrangements - in order to gauge their overall impact in combination on the experience of risk.

He retains a special interest in the fragmentation of international law, in legal theory - drawing in particular on critical theory - and in rule of law promotion: the contemporary form of law and development.

 


 

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Dr Charles Palmer
Assistant Professor of Environment and Development

Dr Charles Palmer is an economist working at the interface of environment and development, specialising in 'green' issues such as those, for example, relating to rural development and deforestation. Typically, he applies both quantitative methods and conceptual frameworks to analyse environmental decision-making at the micro-level, e.g. household or village. His recent work has focused on land use and climate change, specifically on carbon sequestration contracts and Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD), the cost-effectiveness of policy to implement payments for environmental services (PES), and the evolution of protected area policy under weak property rights.

 


 

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Dr Hakan Seckinelgin
Associate Professor in Social Policy

Dr Hakan Seckinelgin has worked on the impact of international HIV/AIDS policies on the disease in sub-Saharan Africa (Botswana, Uganda, Rwanda, Zambia and South Africa) by analysing the agency of international actors and their knowledge claims. He has also done research on the politics and social policy of international relations.

 

Finance

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Dr Pritish Behuria
Fellow, Department of International Development

Dr Pritish Behuria's research focuses on the political economy of late development. In particular, his research explores the politics of industrial policy. His research engages with the literature on political settlements and developmental states, exploring how ruling elites use ideology, violence and rents to protect their reign while sometimes committing to development.

Follow him on Twitter: @pritishbehuria

 


 

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Dr Sandra Sequeira
Assistant Professor in Development Economics

Dr Sandra Sequeria's research applies a combination of experimental and quasi-experimental methods to three broad themes in development economics: infrastructure and growth, private sector development in developing countries and the economic costs of bureaucratic corruption. She has conducted fieldwork in Zambia, South Africa, Mozambique, Peru, India and Ghana, and has consulted for the United Nations, the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation and the Government of Mozambique.

 


 

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Dr Joachim Wehner
Associate Professor in Public Policy

Dr Joachim Wehner research interests include public budgeting, fiscal policy, legislatures, decentralisation, as well as governance and politics in Africa.

 

Gender

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Professor Rita Astuti
Professor of Social Anthropology

Professor Rita Astuti is an expert in the anthropology of Madagascar. Her first period of extensive fieldwork among Vezo fishing people took place in the late 1980s, and focused on kinship, personhood, gender, and identity. Since then, she has revisited her ethnographic findings through a research project on how Vezo children and adults categorise the social world and how they conceptualise the distinction between "us" and "them."

 


 

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Professor Catherine Campbell
Professor of Social Psychology

Professor Catherine Campbell is a community health psychologist with a particular interest in the community-level determinants of health, and the potential for various forms of grassroots community participation to enhance health and well-being in marginalised communities - particularly in the context of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in less affluent countries.The starting point of her current research is that a key reason for the disappointing outcomes of many HIV/AIDS programmes is that they are imposed on communities by outside professionals, failing to resonate with the perceived needs and interests of target groupings. Communities are too often regarded as the passive recipients of prevention, care and treatment services, rather than as active participants working in partnership with health professionals to improve their health. Her work aims to show why community involvement is important for health, and how best to facilitate this in real social settings.

 


  

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Professor Sylvia Chant
Professor of Development Geography

Professor Sylvia Chant's main and enduring interests are gender, poverty, migration, women's employment, household survival strategies and female-headed households. She has a particular interest in families and households, lone parenthood, female-headed households, men and masculinities, migration, employment, housing, urban informal economy, poverty, the ‘feminisation of poverty’, and household livelihoods. Her geographical expertise extends across Africa, Asia and Latin America, with dedicated field experience  in Gambia, Philippines, Costa Rica and Mexico.

In 2011, Professor Chant was made a Fellow of the RSA in recognition of her expertise and exploration of gender issues within geographical development, and in 2015 was conferred as a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences on account of her role in ‘helping to stake out the field of gender and development’.

Sylvia’s latest books include The International Handbook of Gender and Poverty: Concepts, Research, Policy (Elgar, 2010, editor), and Cities,Slums and Gender in the Global South: Towards a Feminised Urban Future (Routledge, 2016, co-authored with Cathy McIlwaine).

 


 

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Dr Ernestina Coast
Associate Professor in Population Studies

Dr Ernestina Coast’s research agenda focuses on i) sexual and reproductive health and ii) the production and consumption of household survey data. 

Her research is multidisciplinary and is positioned at an intersection of social science perspectives and approaches including health, gender, demography and development. 

Dr Coast’s work on abortion has involved producing research that questions the established binary classification of un/safe abortions and critiques notions of pregnancy “wantedness”.  Her research on HIV/AIDS sheds light on the blurring of rural/urban categories for internal migration and the meanings of male semen and their implications for understanding sexual behaviour. 

Her work on scrutinising established understandings of what a household is, and the implications for household survey evidence, forms the core of a substantial set of research from Africa.  She is leading a three-country (Ethiopia, Malawi, Zambia) comparative study of adolescents and contraception and abortion and is involved in GAGE (Gender & Adolescence: Global Evidence).

 


 

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Dr Marsha Henry
Associate Professor, Gender Institute
Deputy Director, Centre for Women, Peace and Security

Dr Marsha Henry joined LSE in July 2009, having previously taught at University of Bristol, University of British Columbia, Canada, the Open University and Warwick University. She read English Literature at the University of British Columbia, Canada, before studying for a Master's in Gender and International Development at the University of Warwick. She continued her postgraduate studies at Warwick obtaining a PhD in Women and Gender in 2001. She carried out postdoctoral research in the Centre for Women's Studies and Gender Relations at the University of British Columbia, before returning to the UK in order to take up a position at the University of Bristol in 2002. Before taking up her post at LSE, she was a lecturer in the School for Policy Studies (2002-2006) and the Politics Department at the University of Bristol (2006-2009).

Follow her on Twitter: @mghacademic

 


 

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Dr Holly Porter
Visiting Fellow in International Development
Lead Researcher (Northern Uganda), Justice and Security Research Programme

Dr Holly Porter is a Research Fellow in the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics and holds a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship with the Institute of Development Policy and Management (University of Antwerp) and the Conflict Research Group (Ghent University).

Holly's research has focused on gender, sexualities, violence, and local notions of healing and justice in northern Uganda where she has lived for more than ten years.

She is the author of After Rape: violence justice and social harmony in Uganda, published by Cambridge University Press. Her work has also been published in journals including Africa, the Women's Studies International Forum, and the Journal of Eastern African Studies.

 

Global South

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Professor Chris Alden
Professor in International Relations and Director of the Global South Unit

Professor Chris Alden is a former Programme Head, Global Powers and Africa, South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA). He is author and co-author of numerous books and reports, including The South and World Politics (Palgrave 2010), China and Latin America (CLSA 2009), China in Africa (Zed 2007), and co-editor of China Returns to Africa (Hurst 2008), Japan and South Africa (Ashgate 2003), as well as articles in internationally recognised journals. He has contributed to research, conferences and publications on the South African foreign policy since 1991, on the changing role of China and Africa since 1992 and China and Latin America since 2007. He has conducted consultancies for the World Bank, the African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, CLSA, JP Morgan, Goldman Sachs, Standard Bank (SA) and Rand Merchant Bank (SA) amongst others.

 

Growth

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Dr Jonathan Leape
Associate Professor of Economics

Dr Jonathan Leape is the Executive Director of the IGC.  He is also an Associate Professor of Economics at the LSE and was previously director of the highly innovative “LSE 100 The LSE Course: Understanding the Causes of Things” since 2009.  He was the founding director of the Centre for Research into Economics and Finance in Southern Africa, which was established at LSE in 1990 as an initiative of the Commonwealth Heads of Government to support the democratic transition in South Africa. His research interests centre on public economics, with a particular focus on taxation and regulation, including congestion charging.

 


 

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Dr Sandra Sequeira
Assistant Professor in Development Economics

Dr Sandra Sequeria's research applies a combination of experimental and quasi-experimental methods to three broad themes in development economics: infrastructure and growth, private sector development in developing countries and the economic costs of bureaucratic corruption. She has conducted fieldwork in Zambia, South Africa, Mozambique, Peru, India and Ghana, and has consulted for the United Nations, the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation and the Government of Mozambique.

 


 

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Professor John Sutton
Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics

Professor John Sutton's research focuses on processes of globalisation, trade liberalisation, and economic transformations. His Enterprise Map Project aims at providing a detailed profile of industries and of leading industrial companies in each of several countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The first four volumes are on Ethiopia, Ghana, Tanzania, Zambia and Mozambique.

 

Health

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Professor Tim Allen
Professor of Development Anthropology
Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa
Head of Department, Department of International Development

Professor Tim Allen is the inaugural Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa and the Head of the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Tim has expertise in the fields of complex emergencies, ethnic conflict, forced migration, local conceptions of health and healing, controlling tropical diseases, humanitarianism and development aid. Much of his field research has focussed on East Africa.

 


 

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Professor Catherine Campbell
Professor of Social Psychology

Professor Catherine Campbell is a community health psychologist with a particular interest in the community-level determinants of health, and the potential for various forms of grassroots community participation to enhance health and well-being in marginalised communities - particularly in the context of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in less affluent countries.The starting point of her current research is that a key reason for the disappointing outcomes of many HIV/AIDS programmes is that they are imposed on communities by outside professionals, failing to resonate with the perceived needs and interests of target groupings. Communities are too often regarded as the passive recipients of prevention, care and treatment services, rather than as active participants working in partnership with health professionals to improve their health. Her work aims to show why community involvement is important for health, and how best to facilitate this in real social settings.

 


 

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Dr Malvern Tatenda Chiweshe
Post-doctoral Fellow

Dr Malvern Tatenda Chiweshe joined LSE as an African-based post-doctoral fellow in April 2017. His work is on a three-country (Zambia, Malawi and Ethiopia) study focusing on improving adolescent access to contraception and safe abortion.

Previously he was a Post-doctoral Fellow at the Critical Studies in Sexualities and Reproduction research programme at Rhodes University, South Africa in 2016.

He holds a PhD in Psychology and a MA in Clinical Psychology from Rhodes University and a BSc Honours in Psychology from the University of Zimbabwe.

 


 

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Dr Ernestina Coast
Associate Professor in Population Studies

Dr Ernestina Coast’s research agenda focuses on i) sexual and reproductive health and ii) the production and consumption of household survey data. 

Her research is multidisciplinary and is positioned at an intersection of social science perspectives and approaches including health, gender, demography and development. 

Dr Coast’s work on abortion has involved producing research that questions the established binary classification of un/safe abortions and critiques notions of pregnancy “wantedness”.  Her research on HIV/AIDS sheds light on the blurring of rural/urban categories for internal migration and the meanings of male semen and their implications for understanding sexual behaviour. 

Her work on scrutinising established understandings of what a household is, and the implications for household survey evidence, forms the core of a substantial set of research from Africa.  She is leading a three-country (Ethiopia, Malawi, Zambia) comparative study of adolescents and contraception and abortion and is involved in GAGE (Gender & Adolescence: Global Evidence).

 

 


 

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Dr Emily Freeman
Research Fellow in Social Policy, LSE Health and Personal Social Services Research Unit 

Dr Emily Freeman is an anthropological demographer focused on ageing and sexual and reproductive health, and the way in which they shape and are shaped by social institutions and processes. Dr Freeman's research includes long term social care in Africa, sexual behaviour and HIV/AIDS in older age, sexual health (including abortion), sexual partnerships and fertility intentions.

 


 

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Dr Tiziana Leone
Assistant Professor in Social Policy

Dr Tiziana Leone is a demographer with a statistical background. She is particularly interested in reproductive maternal health and health systems in low-income countries. Some of the past work she has done include the role of social networks and community factors affecting family planning choices and overmedicalisation of births.

Dr Leone is currently working on projects that analyse the effect of health systems reforms on health inequalities and on the demand versus supply influence on the increasing caesarean sections' rates. She is also interested in the use of demographic data sources in low resource countries such as census and survey data.

 


 

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Dr Philipa Mladovsky
Assistant Professor in International Development

Dr Philipa Mladovsky’s research interests include universal health coverage, health care financing, equity in access to health care, migrant health and the impact of the financial crisis on health systems. Between 2011 and 2014 she was the scientific coordinator of Health Inc. (Financing health care for inclusion), a three-year EU funded research project which explored how social exclusion restricts access to health services despite recent health financing reforms in Ghana, Senegal and the Indian states of Maharashtra and Karnataka. She has also coordinated, authored and edited several studies published by the World Health Organization and the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.

 


 

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Dr Hakan Seckinelgin

Associate Professor in Social Policy

Dr Hakan Seckinelgin has worked on the impact of international HIV/AIDS policies on the disease in sub-Saharan Africa (Botswana, Uganda, Rwanda, Zambia and South Africa) by analysing the agency of international actors and their knowledge claims. He has also done research on the politics and social policy of international relations.

 


 

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Dr Clare Wenham
Fellow, LSE Health

Dr Wenham’s work for the most part falls in the cross over between global health and international relations. Her work focuses on global health governance, health security, surveillance and infectious disease control. In particular her work focuses on pandemic influenza, Ebola and more broadly on the governance structures of the global health landscape and global disease control. Her recent work has appeared in The Lancet, Third World Quarterly and Global Health Governance.

She holds a PhD in International Relations from the Centre for Health and International Relations at Aberystwyth University. Her thesis examined the tensions between global disease governance and individual state sovereignty.

 


 

History

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Dr Leigh Gardner
Assistant Professor in Economic History

Dr Leigh Gardner's research focuses on the economic history of Africa and the British Empire. She is particularly interested in the monetary and fiscal systems of sub-Saharan Africa during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and in comparative research which places African countries in a global context. Her first book, Taxing Colonial Africa: The Political Economy of British Imperialism (Oxford, 2012) illustrates how fiscal imperatives shapes British colonial institutions in African colonies. Most recently, Dr Gardner has begun a project comparing the development of independent countries in Africa with their colonised neighbours in order to distinguish the effects of colonialism from more general constraints on development faced by peripheral countries before World War II. She is also extending her work on the financial organisation of the British Empire, looking particularly at how efforts to resolve agency problems helped shape imperial institutions.

 


 

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Dr Alessandro Iandolo
British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in International History

Dr Alessandro Iandolo’s main research interest is the history of the Soviet Union during the Cold War, with a specific focus on Soviet economic and technical cooperation with the Third World. His doctoral thesis is a study of the USSR’s relations with Ghana, Guinea, and Mali during the Khrushchev era, based on Soviet, Ghanaian, Malian, British and French sources.

Thanks to support from the British Academy, he is working on a new research project that links Soviet involvement in the Third World with the experience of modernisation within the USSR. The core aim of his research is to show the key contribution made by the Soviet Union to the emergence of a model of development centred on state investment and public ownership, a model that has proved successful in a large number of developing countries in recent decades.

 


 

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Dr John Kent
Associate Professor in International Relations

Dr John Kent has done research into the history and theory of Cold War; Britain and Middle East 1945-56; British foreign and defence policy, 1945-70; and US foreign policy especially towards black Africa, 1945-76.

 


 

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Dr Joanna Lewis
Assistant Professor in Imperial and African History

Dr Joanna Lewis is a historian of the historical relationship between Britain and Africa. Her research has focused on the ideology and practice of colonial rule from pre-Scramble, through to the end of the Cold War. Her early research examined colonial government and development theory in British Kenya. She then became concerned with imperialism, politics and culture from the late nineteenth century, to liberation and the post-colonial state in central Africa. She has recently finished a monograph on David Livingstone, ideology and humanitarianism. Her sources have always been eclectic, reflecting the different conversations between Britain and Africa ranging from deep immersion in official records, to NGOs, literature and last but by no means least, newspapers. She remains interested in the history of death, emotion and memory in the age of globalisation and she is writing a book on the history of British journalists in Africa from Henry Morton Stanley to the present day.

 

ICTs

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Dr Laura Mann
Assistant Professor in International Development

Dr Laura Mann is a sociologist whose research focuses on the political economy of markets and new information and communication technologies in Africa. She received her Masters and PhD from the Centre of African Studies at the University of Edinburgh and her BSc in Environmental Policy and Economics from the London School of Economics. 

Before joining the LSE as an assistant professor, she worked as a postdoc at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford and the African Studies Centre in Leiden. Her geographical expertise includes Egypt, Sudan, Kenya, Rwanda and more recently, South Africa. If she could sum up her research interests in one question, it would be "under what conditions do people become recognisably valuable to their governments (both economically and politically)?" 

Follow her on Twitter: @balootiful

 

Media

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Professor Charlie Beckett
Professor in Media and CommunicationsDirector of Polis

Professor Charlie Beckett has 20 years' experience of international journalism at the BBC and ITN's Channel 4 News. He is the author of SuperMedia: saving journalism so it can save the world (Blackwell 2008). He is a specialist in media change: how the news media is changing and the rise of online journalism and citizen journalism.

He has also researched: UK politics and media; American politics and media; development and media; African media and democracy; financial journalism; journalism ethics; public service broadcasting; war and conflict reporting; media and Muslims.

 


 

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Dr Fatima El-Issawi
Research Fellow, LSE Middle East Centre

Dr Fatima El-Issawi is currently leading on a collaboration project with the American University of Dubai entitled 'Arab National Media and Politics: Democracy Revisited', looking at changes in media practices in traditional media industries in Morocco and Algeria.

This project builds on previous research led between 2012 and 2014, based at POLIS in the Department of Media and Communications LSE. The project looked at the transformations brought by the transitional political landscape to Arab traditional media in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. The in-depth field data was instrumental in mapping trends in traditional media under transitions providing sustained and updated data on the intricate link between media and democratisation in Arab countries under transition. This study was made possible thanks to a grant from Open Society Foundation.

Dr El-Issawi has over 15 years of experience in covering the Middle East for international media such as Agence France Presse (AFP) and the BBC Arabic Service, with a specific expertise in Iraq and Lebanon. She is also media consultant for several media development and international agencies including the European Commission, the Council of Europe and the Doha Centre for media Freedom.

 


 

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Dr Joseph Hanlon
Visiting Senior Fellow in International Development

Half of Dr Joseph Hanlon’s work is on Mozambique. He has written seven books on Mozambique and has reported on all of Mozambique's multi-party elections. He curates a website with Mozambique election data since 1999 to encourage collaborative research. Dr Hanlon has edited a newsletter on Mozambique since 1993, which is available free on request by contacting him j.hanlon@lse.ac.uk.

The other half of his work has been more varied, including civil wars, cash transfers (child benefit, non-contributory pension, etc), and Zimbabwe's land reform. Research is also underway looking at small scale commercial agriculture in four African countries.

 


 

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Dr Joanna Lewis
Assistant Professor in Imperial and African History

Dr Joanna Lewis is a historian of the historical relationship between Britain and Africa. Her research has focused on the ideology and practice of colonial rule from pre-Scramble, through to the end of the Cold War. Her early research examined colonial government and development theory in British Kenya. She then became concerned with imperialism, politics and culture from the late nineteenth century, to liberation and the post-colonial state in central Africa. She has recently finished a monograph on David Livingstone, ideology and humanitarianism. Her sources have always been eclectic, reflecting the different conversations between Britain and Africa ranging from deep immersion in official records, to NGOs, literature and last but by no means least, newspapers. She remains interested in the history of death, emotion and memory in the age of globalisation and she is writing a book on the history of British journalists in Africa from Henry Morton Stanley to the present day.

 


 

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Dr Laura Mann
Assistant Professor in International Development

Dr Laura Mann is a sociologist whose research focuses on the political economy of markets and new information and communication technologies in Africa. She received her Masters and PhD from the Centre of African Studies at the University of Edinburgh and her BSc in Environmental Policy and Economics from the London School of Economics. 

Before joining the LSE as an assistant professor, she worked as a postdoc at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford and the African Studies Centre in Leiden. Her geographical expertise includes Egypt, Sudan, Kenya, Rwanda and more recently, South Africa. If she could sum up her research interests in one question, it would be "under what conditions do people become recognisably valuable to their governments (both economically and politically)?" 

Follow her on Twitter: @balootiful

 


 

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Dr Wendy Willems
Assistant Professor in Media and Communications

Dr Wendy Willems’ approach to media, communication and development is grounded in critical theory/cultural studies and seeks to deconstruct mainstream approaches to communication and development ('ComDev'), hereby engaging with key theoretical perspectives on power and resistance and connecting with broader debates in media and cultural studies on internationalising, dewesternising and decolonising the field. Interrogating the role of media in elections and citizen participation in Zambia and Zimbabwe, her research contends that the bulk of academic research on media and communication in Africa has studied media through the normative lens of (Western) liberal-democratic media-state relations. She argues that this approach has insufficiently looked at the actual, historical and contextual role of media in African societies but instead focused on what roles media ought to play on the continent. Furthermore, the heavy focus on media-state relations has ignored the way in which ordinary people relate to media.
Her most recent research investigates the role of new media (mobile phones and social media) in processes of social change. Critiquing mainstream development approaches, Dr Willems examines the way in which mobile media are implicated in reconfigurations of space, mobility and social relations in an age of neoliberalism. Focusing on Zambia as a case study, she considers mobile phones as both a product of the neoliberal turn as well as an 'enabler' of this turn.
While dominant approaches to ICTs have mostly celebrated their empowering potential in Africa, she considers the potential of mobile phones in bringing about emancipation while simultaneously treating these technologies as always embedded within complex relations of economic, social and political power which may have potentially limiting effects. Dr Willems is interested in understanding how mobile phones impact on conceptions of space, mobility and social relationships as well as how relations between online and offline spaces are forged in particular localities and processes of social change.

 

Migration

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Professor Tim Allen
Professor of Development Anthropology
Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa
Head of Department, Department of International Development

Professor Tim Allen is the inaugural Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa and the Head of the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Tim has expertise in the fields of complex emergencies, ethnic conflict, forced migration, local conceptions of health and healing, controlling tropical diseases, humanitarianism and development aid. Much of his field research has focussed on East Africa.

 


 

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Dr Chaloka Beyani
Associate Professor of International Law
Member of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights and Chair of its Advisory Board
Member of the Centre for Climate Change

Dr Chaloka Beyani is also the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons. He joined the Department of Law at LSE in 1996 and lectures in international law and human rights. He was formerly a Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford, with Lectureships in Law at Exeter and St. Catherine's colleges, Oxford, and a Crown Prince of Jordan Fellow, Queen Elizabeth House, as part of the Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford.

Dr Beyani studied law at the University of Oxford (D.Phil) and at the University of Zambia (UNZA)(LLB, LLM). He has taught international law, human rights, public law, and criminal law at Oxford and UNZA. He is Visiting Professor of International Law at the University of Toronto and Santa Clara University. 

Dr Beyani is a recognised international and United Nations expert on internally displaced persons, population transfers, mercenaries and private military companies, sexual and reproductive health, the human rights based approach to development, climate change, making treaties, and making constitutions. He has served as a legal adviser and expert to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the Office of the High Commissioner on Refugees, the World Health Organization, the United Nations Population Fund, United Nations Development Fund for Women, the European Union, the Commonwealth Secretariat, and the African Union. 

He was a member of the High Level Panel of Eminent Persons of the African Union on the Formation of an African Union Government. He has served as an expert to the African Union on the issue of universal jurisdiction and was a member of the joint African Union and European Union ad hoc Expert Group on Universal Jurisdiction. He is currently a member of the UK Foreign Secretary's Advisory Group on Human Rights.

Dr Beyani has practical legal and political experience in making national constitutions. He was a member of the official Committee of Experts on Constitutional Review of the Republic of Kenya, the Committee that drafted and prepared the Constitution of Kenya, which was adopted by referendum in 2010. He also has practical legal and diplomatic experience in treaty making, having drafted and negotiated the adoption of the African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons 2009. He also drafted and negotiated the adoption of 11 peace treaties under the framework of the Pact on Peace, Stability and Development of the Great Lakes Region 2006.

 


 

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Professor Sylvia Chant
Professor of Development Geography

Professor Sylvia Chant's main and enduring interests are gender, poverty, migration, women's employment, household survival strategies and female-headed households. She has a particular interest in families and households, lone parenthood, female-headed households, men and masculinities, migration, employment, housing, urban informal economy, poverty, the ‘feminisation of poverty’, and household livelihoods. Her geographical expertise extends across Africa, Asia and Latin America, with dedicated field experience  in Gambia, Philippines, Costa Rica and Mexico.

In 2011, Professor Chant was made a Fellow of the RSA in recognition of her expertise and exploration of gender issues within geographical development, and in 2015 was conferred as a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences on account of her role in ‘helping to stake out the field of gender and development’.

 


 

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Dr Jason Hickel
Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in Anthropology

Dr Jason Hickel specialises on globalisation, finance, democracy, violence, and ritual, and has been engaged in ethnographic and archival research in Southern Africa since 2004. His present research focuses on finance in South Africa, looking at how the central bank manages market expectations and economic behaviour in the post-crisis context through technologies of public communication.

Follow him on Twitter @jasonhickel

 


 

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Professor Deborah James
Professor of Anthropology

Professor Deborah James is a specialist in the anthropology of South and Southern Africa where she has done fieldwork in Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces and their urban hinterland, the Witwatersrand. Her previous book, Gaining Ground? "Rights" and "Property" in South African land reform, (Routledge, 2007) shows how mutually constitutive discourses about the ownership, use, and governance of land reveal contradictory understandings of custom, community and citizenship.

Professor James' interest in the contestations between state- and market-driven ideologies also encompasses issues relating to reproductive health and HIV-AIDS. Earlier research focused on ethnicity, migration, and musical performance: in Songs of the Women Migrants (Edinburgh, 1999) she explored how women migrants from the Northern Province defined themselves as ethnic subjects through musical performance.

She is also interested in comparative insights into the state, law, civil society, and religion: both in postcolonial settings and in the UK, and co-edited a volume called Apartheid of Souls which brought together scholars on Indonesia and South Africa.

In 2002-03, Professor James conducted ESRC-funded research on 'Property, Community, and Citizenship in South Africa's Land Reform Programme', and she is currently director of an ESRC funded project on 'Investing, engaging in enterprise, gambling and getting into debt: popular economies and citizen expectations in South Africa'.

 


 

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Dr Claire Mercer
Associate Professor of Human Geography

Working at the interface of Human Geography, African Studies and Development Studies, Dr Claire Mercer's early research developed a geographical critique of the concept of civil society that confronted assumptions about the spatiality and makeability’ of African civil society. Drawing on ideas from postcolonial studies this work recast the discussion of civil society in Africa in terms that emphasized the diverse social and political work done by civil society actors such as NGOs and home associations.

Recent research has been concerned with the relationship between the African diaspora and the African continent. This research places Africa at the centre of questions about diaspora. Dr Mercer recently completed a four-year ESRC-funded research project, graded ‘outstanding’, which examined the development work undertaken in Africa by diaspora communities in Britain. This involved a study of four transnational home associations from Cameroon and Tanzania (with Ben Page, UCL; and Martin Evans, University of Chester). The book based on the project, Development and the African diaspora: place and the politics of home is published by Zed Books. is published by Zed Books. 

Dr Mercer is currently working on new research on the middle classes, domestic architecture and suburban space in Tanzania.

 

Politics

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Dr Pritish Behuria
Fellow, Department of International Development

Dr Pritish Behuria's research focuses on the political economy of late development. In particular, his research explores the politics of industrial policy. His research engages with the literature on political settlements and developmental states, exploring how ruling elites use ideology, violence and rents to protect their reign while sometimes committing to development.

Follow him on Twitter: @pritishbehuria

 


 

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Professor Catherine Boone
Professor of Comparative Politics and African Political Economy in Government and International Development

Professor Catherine Boone’s current research interests include: Property rights and development, territorial politics and political geography in state- and institution-building, land tenure and land use policy, institutional approaches to political explanation and their critics, subnational political analysis, African political economy, land politics in post-conflict settings.

 


 

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Professor Teddy Brett
Visiting Professor in International Development

Professor Teddy Brett’s research interests lie in the political economy of development, institutional and organisational reform and problems of crisis and reconstruction in Africa, and especially in Uganda, Zimbabwe and South Africa.

  


  

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Professor Katrin Flikschuh
Professor in Political Theory

Professor Katrin Flikschuh works on the political philosophy of Immanuel Kant and its relationship with contemporary political liberalism. She has a special focus on Kant's cosmopolitanism and current debates on cosmopolitanism/global distributive justice. She is interested in the relationship between moral and political values and notions of global political responsibility. Her related interests include contemporary human rights discourse, theories of property rights, and the history of modern political thought. She has also organised conferences with the goal of bridging the gap between Western and African normative theorists.

 


 

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Professor Fawaz Gerges
Emirates Chair in Contemporary Middle East Studies
Professor of International Relations

Professor Fawaz Gerges’ most recent books are Contentious Politics in the Middle East: Popular Resistance and Marginalised Activism beyond the Arab Uprisings (Palgrave Macmillan, September 2015); The New Middle East: Protest and Revolution in the Arab World (Cambridge University Press, November 2013); Obama and the Middle East: The End of America’s Moment? (Palgrave Macmillan, September 2013). On the ten-year anniversary of 9/11, Oxford University Press released Professor Gerges’ book, The Rise and Fall of Al Qaeda.

His special interests include Islam and the political process, social movements, including mainstream Islamist movements and jihadist groups (like the Muslim Brotherhood and Al Qaeda), Arab politics and Muslim politics in the 20th century, the international relations of the Middle East, the Arab-Israeli conflict, state and society in the Middle East, American foreign policy towards the Muslim world, the modern history of the Middle East, history of conflict, diplomacy and foreign policy, and historical sociology.

 


 

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Dr Elliott Green
Associate Professor of Development Studies

Dr Elliott Green is primarily concerned with the political demography of ethnicity and nationalism in the modern world, with a specific focus on sub-Saharan Africa. In particular he is interested in the causes and consequences of urbanisation, the origins of ethnic diversity and ethnic identity change, the relationship between nationalism and economic development and the political economy of rural patronage. He has carried out field work in Uganda, Tanzania and Botswana.

 


 

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Dr Jason Hickel
Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in Anthropology

Dr Jason Hickel specialises on globalisation, finance, democracy, violence, and ritual, and has been engaged in ethnographic and archival research in Southern Africa since 2004. His present research focuses on finance in South Africa, looking at how the central bank manages market expectations and economic behaviour in the post-crisis context through technologies of public communication.

Follow him on Twitter @jasonhickel

 


 

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Dr Ryan Jablonski
Assistant Professor in Government

Dr Ryan Jablonski specialises in the international political economy of development. His current research examines how political incentives influence foreign aid distribution and effectiveness. He also uses field experiments to understand the effects of foreign aid on voters. He has shown that electoral incentives play a role in shaping both the geography of aid and the success of donor efforts. He also conducts research on the effects of electoral violence and the role of transnational crime and piracy on economic development.

He has been a consultant for the World Bank and other organisations. His research has been published in World Politics, British Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Conflict Resolution. He received his PhD and MA in political science from University of California, San Diego.

Follow him on Twitter: @ryan_jablonski

 


 

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Dr John Kent
Associate Professor in International Relations

Dr John Kent has done research into the history and theory of Cold War; Britain and Middle East 1945-56; British foreign and defence policy, 1945-70; and US foreign policy especially towards black Africa, 1945-76.

 


 

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Dr Brian Klaas
Fellow in Comparative Politics

Dr Brian Klaas graduated Summa Cum Laude with his B.A. in Politics and History from Carleton College (Minnesota, USA) in 2008. During the course of his MPhil (St. Antony’s College, Oxford; 2013) and his DPhil (New College, Oxford; 2015), he conducted extensive field research interviewing politicians, rebels, generals, diplomats, journalists, and journalists in Madagascar, Thailand, Tunisia, Côte d’Ivoire, and Zambia as part of his dissertation, which argued that election rigging often provokes coups d’état and civil wars. 

Follow him on Twitter @brianklaas

 


 

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Dr Joanna Lewis
Assistant Professor in Imperial and African History

Dr Joanna Lewis is a historian of the historical relationship between Britain and Africa. Her research has focused on the ideology and practice of colonial rule from pre-Scramble, through to the end of the Cold War. Her early research examined colonial government and development theory in British Kenya. She then became concerned with imperialism, politics and culture from the late nineteenth century, to liberation and the post-colonial state in central Africa. She has recently finished a monograph on David Livingstone, ideology and humanitarianism. Her sources have always been eclectic, reflecting the different conversations between Britain and Africa ranging from deep immersion in official records, to NGOs, literature and last but by no means least, newspapers. She remains interested in the history of death, emotion and memory in the age of globalisation and she is writing a book on the history of British journalists in Africa from Henry Morton Stanley to the present day.

 


 

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Dr Murray Low
Associate Professor of Human Geography

Dr Murray Low's research focuses on relationships between geography and democracy including institutional and spatial aspects of elections, changing practices of accountability and legitimacy in cities, and the geography of political party organisations and social movements. His work has dealt with the relationships between global networks and democracy, constructions of globalization and states in geography, and geographical aspects of political representation. He has recently completed research funded by the Leverhulme Foundation into city democratisation in South Africa. His books include Spaces of Democracy: Geographical Perspectives on Citizenship, Participation and Representation (Sage, 2004), and The Sage Handbook of Political Geography (Sage, 2008), both of which he co-edited.

Follow on Twitter: @MurrayLow3

 


 

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Dr Omar McDoom
Assistant Professor in Comparative Politics

Dr Omar McDoom is interested in the causes of political violence between groups - be they defined along ethnic, religious, or other social lines. Genocides, civil wars, ethnic conflicts, as well as insurgencies and terrorism are within the scope of his interest. He has particular knowledge of the Rwandan genocide and of Africa’s Great Lakes region more generally. He is also interested in the politics of the development and humanitarian aid industries – especially in how they operate in sub-Saharan Africa.

Dr McDoom has previously held research fellowships at Harvard and Oxford Universities. He has worked as a Policy Officer for the World Bank, a Legal Officer for the Government of Guyana, and on electoral missions for the OSCE and UN. He co-directs a non-profit organisation, Latin Balle Pee, which develops leadership ability in children caught in northern Uganda's civil war: www.thechildisinnocent.org

Follow him on Twitter: @omarmcdoom

 


 

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Dr Joachim Wehner
Associate Professor in Public Policy

Dr Joachim Wehner research interests include public budgeting, fiscal policy, legislatures, decentralisation, as well as governance and politics in Africa.

 


 

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Dr Clare Wenham
Fellow, LSE Health

Dr Wenham’s work for the most part falls in the cross over between global health and international relations. Her work focuses on global health governance, health security, surveillance and infectious disease control. In particular her work focuses on pandemic influenza, Ebola and more broadly on the governance structures of the global health landscape and global disease control. Her recent work has appeared in The Lancet, Third World Quarterly and Global Health Governance.

She holds a PhD in International Relations from the Centre for Health and International Relations at Aberystwyth University. Her thesis examined the tensions between global disease governance and individual state sovereignty.

 

 

Poverty and Inequality

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Professor Catherine Campbell
Professor of Social Psychology

Professor Catherine Campbell is a community health psychologist with a particular interest in the community-level determinants of health, and the potential for various forms of grassroots community participation to enhance health and well-being in marginalised communities - particularly in the context of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in less affluent countries.The starting point of her current research is that a key reason for the disappointing outcomes of many HIV/AIDS programmes is that they are imposed on communities by outside professionals, failing to resonate with the perceived needs and interests of target groupings. Communities are too often regarded as the passive recipients of prevention, care and treatment services, rather than as active participants working in partnership with health professionals to improve their health. Her work aims to show why community involvement is important for health, and how best to facilitate this in real social settings.

 


 

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Professor Sylvia Chant
Professor of Development Geography

Professor Sylvia Chant's main and enduring interests are gender, poverty, migration, women's employment, household survival strategies and female-headed households. She has a particular interest in families and households, lone parenthood, female-headed households, men and masculinities, migration, employment, housing, urban informal economy, poverty, the ‘feminisation of poverty’, and household livelihoods. Her geographical expertise extends across Africa, Asia and Latin America, with dedicated field experience  in Gambia, Philippines, Costa Rica and Mexico.

In 2011, Professor Chant was made a Fellow of the RSA in recognition of her expertise and exploration of gender issues within geographical development, and in 2015 was conferred as a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences on account of her role in ‘helping to stake out the field of gender and development’.

 


 

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Dr Ernestina Coast
Associate Professor of Population Studies

Dr Ernestina Coast’s research agenda focuses on i) sexual and reproductive health and ii) the production and consumption of household survey data. 

Her research is multidisciplinary and is positioned at an intersection of social science perspectives and approaches including health, gender, demography and development. 

Dr Coast’s work on abortion has involved producing research that questions the established binary classification of un/safe abortions and critiques notions of pregnancy “wantedness”.  Her research on HIV/AIDS sheds light on the blurring of rural/urban categories for internal migration and the meanings of male semen and their implications for understanding sexual behaviour. 

Her work on scrutinising established understandings of what a household is, and the implications for household survey evidence, forms the core of a substantial set of research from Africa.  She is leading a three-country (Ethiopia, Malawi, Zambia) comparative study of adolescents and contraception and abortion and is involved in GAGE (Gender & Adolescence: Global Evidence).

 


 

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Dr Jason Hickel
Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in Anthropology

Dr Jason Hickel specialises on globalisation, finance, democracy, violence, and ritual, and has been engaged in ethnographic and archival research in Southern Africa since 2004. His present research focuses on finance in South Africa, looking at how the central bank manages market expectations and economic behaviour in the post-crisis context through technologies of public communication.

Follow him on Twitter @jasonhickel

 


 

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Dr Denis Regnier
Visiting Research Fellow in Anthropology

Dr Denis Regnier received his PhD from the LSE in 2012, with a thesis on the condition of slave descendants in the southern Betsileo highlands of Madagascar. He has subsequently worked with Professor Emeritus Maurice Bloch as a Post-doctoral Research Fellow on an interdisciplinary project at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, for which he carried out further fieldwork in Madagascar.

 

Religion

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Professor Rita Astuti
Professor of Social Anthropology

Professor Rita Astuti is an expert in the anthropology of Madagascar. Her first period of extensive fieldwork among Vezo fishing people took place in the late 1980s, and focused on kinship, personhood, gender, and identity. Since then, she has revisited her ethnographic findings through a research project on how Vezo children and adults categorise the social world and how they conceptualise the distinction between "us" and "them."

 


 

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Professor Matthew Engelke
Professor in Anthropology

Professor Matthew Engelke’s research focuses in the broadest sense on the connections between religion and culture, primarily in Africa and Britain. He has conducted in-depth fieldwork on an African Church in Zimbabwe, evangelical Christians in England, and, most recently, secular humanists in Britain. Throughout this work, he has examined such issues as the importance of textual authority within religious communities; the dynamics of conversion and belief; religion and material culture; religion and media; the role of religion in public life; ritual; and conceptions of the secular and humanism. In addition to these fieldwork-based projects, Professor Engelke has also conducted research in the history of anthropology. His research has been funded by, among other sources, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Fulbright-Hays Commission, the British Academy, the Economic and Social Research Council, and the LSE’s Annual Fund.

 


 

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Professor Fawaz Gerges
Emirates Chair in Contemporary Middle East Studies
Professor of International Relations

Professor Fawaz Gerges’ most recent books are Contentious Politics in the Middle East: Popular Resistance and Marginalised Activism beyond the Arab Uprisings (Palgrave Macmillan, September 2015); The New Middle East: Protest and Revolution in the Arab World (Cambridge University Press, November 2013); Obama and the Middle East: The End of America’s Moment? (Palgrave Macmillan, September 2013). On the ten-year anniversary of 9/11, Oxford University Press released Professor Gerges’ book, The Rise and Fall of Al Qaeda.

His special interests include Islam and the political process, social movements, including mainstream Islamist movements and jihadist groups (like the Muslim Brotherhood and Al Qaeda), Arab politics and Muslim politics in the 20th century, the international relations of the Middle East, the Arab-Israeli conflict, state and society in the Middle East, American foreign policy towards the Muslim world, the modern history of the Middle East, history of conflict, diplomacy and foreign policy, and historical sociology.

 


 

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Dr Kate Meagher
Associate Professor in Development Studies

Dr Kate Meagher has engaged in extensive empirical and theoretical research on the informal economy in rural and urban Africa, with a particular focus on Nigeria. Her current research interests include social networks and non-state governance in Africa, the politics of economic informality, enterprise clusters, vigilantism and organised crime, and new religious movements

 

Resources

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Dr Jason Hickel
Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in Anthropology

Dr Jason Hickel specialises on globalisation, finance, democracy, violence, and ritual, and has been engaged in ethnographic and archival research in Southern Africa since 2004. His present research focuses on finance in South Africa, looking at how the central bank manages market expectations and economic behaviour in the post-crisis context through technologies of public communication.

Follow him on Twitter @jasonhickel

 


  

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Dr Gisa Weszkalnys
Assistant Professor in Anthropology

Dr Gisa Weszkalnys specialises in the ethnographic study of natural resources, specifically oil in Africa. In the past, she has carried out intensive research on the politics of urban planning in Germany. She also worked on interdisciplinary research policy and practice in Europe and the US. Dr Weszkalnys has carried out consultancy research in the field of natural resources and development, for example, with UNDP in São Tomé and Príncipe and with the Open Society Institute in Angola.

 

Urbanisation

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Professor Ricky Burdett
Professor of Urban Studies
Director, LSE Cities and the Urban Age Programme 

Professor Burdett is currently advising the United Nations on the 2016 Habitat III conference on sustainable urbanism and curating an exhibition at the 2016 Architecture Biennale in Venice. In 2014, he was a Visiting Professor in Urban Planning and Design at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University, Global Distinguished Professor at New York University from 2010 to 2014 as well as a member of the UK Government’s Independent Airports from 2012 to 2015.

He is involved in regeneration projects across Europe and USA, and was Chief Adviser on Architecture and Urbanism for the London 2012 Olympics and architectural adviser to the Mayor of London from 2001 to 2006. He was Director of the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2006 and curator of the Global Cities exhibition at Tate Modern in 2007.

Professor Burdett was also a member of the Urban Task Force which produced a major report for the UK government on the future of English cities. He is co-editor of The Endless City (2007), Living in the Endless City (2011) and Transforming Urban Economies (2013).

 


 

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Professor Sylvia Chant
Professor of Development Geography

Professor Sylvia Chant's main and enduring interests are gender, poverty, migration, women's employment, household survival strategies and female-headed households. She has a particular interest in families and households, lone parenthood, female-headed households, men and masculinities, migration, employment, housing, urban informal economy, poverty, the ‘feminisation of poverty’, and household livelihoods. Her geographical expertise extends across Africa, Asia and Latin America, with dedicated field experience  in Gambia, Philippines, Costa Rica and Mexico.

In 2011, Professor Chant was made a Fellow of the RSA in recognition of her expertise and exploration of gender issues within geographical development, and in 2015 was conferred as a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences on account of her role in ‘helping to stake out the field of gender and development’.

 


 

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Dr Elliott Green
Associate Professor of Development Studies

Dr Elliott Green is primarily concerned with the political demography of ethnicity and nationalism in the modern world, with a specific focus on sub-Saharan Africa. In particular he is interested in the causes and consequences of urbanisation, the origins of ethnic diversity and ethnic identity change, the relationship between nationalism and economic development and the political economy of rural patronage. He has carried out field work in Uganda, Tanzania and Botswana.

 


 

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Dr Murray Low
Associate Professor of Human Geography

Dr Murray Low's research focuses on relationships between geography and democracy including institutional and spatial aspects of elections, changing practices of accountability and legitimacy in cities, and the geography of political party organisations and social movements. His work has dealt with the relationships between global networks and democracy, constructions of globalization and states in geography, and geographical aspects of political representation. He has recently completed research funded by the Leverhulme Foundation into city democratisation in South Africa. His books include Spaces of Democracy: Geographical Perspectives on Citizenship, Participation and Representation (Sage, 2004), and The Sage Handbook of Political Geography (Sage, 2008), both of which he co-edited.

Follow on Twitter: @MurrayLow3

 


 

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Dr Gisa Weszkalnys
Assistant Professor in Anthropology

Dr Gisa Weszkalnys specialises in the ethnographic study of natural resources, specifically oil in Africa. In the past, she has carried out intensive research on the politics of urban planning in Germany. She also worked on interdisciplinary research policy and practice in Europe and the US. Dr Weszkalnys has carried out consultancy research in the field of natural resources and development, for example, with UNDP in São Tomé and Príncipe and with the Open Society Institute in Angola.

 

Youth

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Professor Catherine Campbell
Professor of Social Psychology

Professor Catherine Campbell is a community health psychologist with a particular interest in the community-level determinants of health, and the potential for various forms of grassroots community participation to enhance health and well-being in marginalised communities - particularly in the context of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in less affluent countries.The starting point of her current research is that a key reason for the disappointing outcomes of many HIV/AIDS programmes is that they are imposed on communities by outside professionals, failing to resonate with the perceived needs and interests of target groupings. Communities are too often regarded as the passive recipients of prevention, care and treatment services, rather than as active participants working in partnership with health professionals to improve their health. Her work aims to show why community involvement is important for health, and how best to facilitate this in real social settings.

 


 

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 Dr Ernestina Coast
Associate Professor in Population Studies

Dr Ernestina Coast’s research agenda focuses on i) sexual and reproductive health and ii) the production and consumption of household survey data. 

Her research is multidisciplinary and is positioned at an intersection of social science perspectives and approaches including health, gender, demography and development. 

Dr Coast’s work on abortion has involved producing research that questions the established binary classification of un/safe abortions and critiques notions of pregnancy “wantedness”.  Her research on HIV/AIDS sheds light on the blurring of rural/urban categories for internal migration and the meanings of male semen and their implications for understanding sexual behaviour. 

Her work on scrutinising established understandings of what a household is, and the implications for household survey evidence, forms the core of a substantial set of research from Africa.  She is leading a three-country (Ethiopia, Malawi, Zambia) comparative study of adolescents and contraception and abortion and is involved in GAGE (Gender & Adolescence: Global Evidence).